84

Much would depend on the concrete situation. But, by default, I would think that activism is part of student's life that the student needs to learn to manage themselves; if they do not have the resources or ability to manage their activism effectively so as not to have them interfere with their studies, then, largely, I would consider this to be their ...


53

Lots of good and lengthy answers here: put concisely the answer is a resounding no. A huge benefit of choosing to do something extracurricular in college is learning the consequences of failing to balance responsibilities. By giving extensions to a student that chooses to spend time doing something outside of coursework, you fail to help them find this ...


38

No. These things are by and large irrelevant. Everyone has hobbies, and many of these may be challenging, but the purpose of a graduate school application is to understand your background as a potential scientist. At best, this will make someone go "Huh, neat, the oboe..." At worse, it will make someone assume that you're either attempting to pad out a ...


24

Should seemingly arbitrary things like “play piano for Church” or “intramural badminton” go on M.S. or PhD applications in sciences/engineering? As long as you are succinct about it, and none of your hobbies take large amounts of time, accomplishments outside your primary field can be a positive addition to a CV or application. However, these features ...


23

I try to always spell things out like this in my syllabus, and I would hope others do, too. For me, I would excuse a small number of minor things, so long as warning is given in advance, but it wouldn't be a valid excuse on a test or especially major assignment. I don't have a specific clause for activism, nor have I gotten excuses from that activity, but ...


13

I would like to offer an alternative, possibly unpopular answer: professors should try to err on the side of making accommodations for extracurricular activities. This includes allowing extensions for student activists when the requests are reasonable. Of course academic work should always be students' first priority. However, for better or worse, colleges ...


12

Student activism would not be something that I would normally grant an extension for. If however, my Dean asked me to grant an extension (either for an individual student or the entire class), I think I would side with my Dean well over 90% of the time. If the Dean made a habit of "interfering" I would likely talk to my Department Chair and complain. I would ...


11

Another issue is that it is difficult for the professor to evaluate the level of engagement of the student. Some activists are working long and hard on noble causes; it would be easy for a lazy student to show up for the parties to get an extension. The personal opinion of the professor in the matter may also influence the results. So, someone may decide ...


8

Revised answer: At my university, where football is big, the athletics department supports itself, and that some of the money goes back to the university, but the only specific instances I know of are donations to the art museum and history of science collection. That said, I am sure most of revenue generated stays within athletics. For instance, this ...


7

Lots of people do this, especially if their funding allows them to take out-of-program courses. But you should Check first that your advisor is OK with it. Tell them that music has always given you a safe, healthy outlet for stress and anxiety. Skip the well-rounded student part. If you don't yet have an advisor, check with the graduate director. In fact, ...


7

Do it. It can only be good for you. And it is generally acceptable. Make sure that your supervisor knows what's going on and approves, though if you are using your own time, there should be no reason not to approve.


7

It very much depends on the quality of your PhD work. If that looks good, it can be a boost to your CV. However, if your work is middling, this may appear like escapism (or perhaps a political career is what you should pursue instead of a PhD). This is always, as @user3209815 said, your decision. What is unlikely to work well is to take up this job and ...


7

I can't speak for other researchers, but I always have a few different projects going at once, and I sometimes switch between them when I feel like I need a change. I don't really get bored easily, but in times when I feel like I am getting "blocked" and my ideas are not progressing well, I go for a walk. One big advantage of this ---over say, ...


6

I think it's completely appropriate. As an anecdote, when I was an undergrad I was in a similar situation. The professor of a WW2 history class I was taking invited all 20-or-so of us undergrads to his home for a barbecue and tour of his collection of WW2 era guns, equipment, newspaper clippings, and so on. It occured before final grades came out. In ...


5

I faced this exact problem when I was applying to grad schools. Here are three ways that worked for me (in order of importance): Include this information in your statement of purpose. I do not recommend going through a laundry list of all the books you have read, however, I would mention the new topics that you are familiar with, how you have been learning ...


4

The answer to this question probably depends a lot on whether the "cultural representative" aspect is a primary goal of the fellowship (e.g., if it is designed to enable artists and poets to travel), or if it is a secondary goal (e.g., they want to make sure contact between cultures is a byproduct of what you do). If it's a primary goal, we probably can't ...


4

would faculty members consider it strange on my part if I ended up as President when I don't even have an advisor and a research project going for me? I think the better question would be whether or not the faculty would care to correlate those things. And the answer is, probably not. Faculty members, especially senior ones, are used to balancing multiple ...


4

Whether or not you get a tenure-track job is going to be driven by your research credentials, and not by extra-curricular activities. However... Interviews and job applications often ask about your service contributions; how you would go about managing people, budgets, and competing demands; etc. Extra-curricular activities such as student leadership may ...


3

One way or the other, you will have to disclose the activity to your university. I can't think of any obvious reason why your university would not allow you to do consulting work on the side. But in any case, talking to your adviser about it would be the correct first step -- she may be able to tell you what her expectations are if you are paid as a graduate ...


3

Within the United States, universities help startups in many different ways. This includes "internal" startups that are created by students and faculty as well as "external" startups that are created by university outsiders but receive support from a University. Google initially had an "exclusive licensing partnership" with Stanford. As noted in a Wall ...


3

It is up to the professor's discretion whether or not this is a reasonable justification for an extension. Ideally, said professor has already outlined the criteria they will accept for academic extensions - usually as you said, serious family issues and illness/death - but individual cases should come down to the professor's own discretion. This may ...


3

I deleted my previous answer as it was assuming undergraduate admission. Assuming graduate admission, and assuming an MS in Engineering (and not say an MBa or Art History), then pretty much everything you mentioned would not count for much. Maybe a little bit, but they would not make you stand out. Graduate degrees are research degrees, so the only thing ...


2

You could discuss your independent learning in your personal statements.


2

At the very least, it shows you are actively interested in the subject. Participation can be enough to show you are more enthusiastic about the subject than other applicants. It is also helpful for entry level data scientist positions where experience isn't necessarily expected, but appreciated. If you have won any competitions, or if you are at the '...


2

Mentioning a slightly quirky hobby can give someone with a pile of CVs a hook to remember you by. They might not remember your name but they will remember that you collect tea pots. Also, often an interview will start with the 'Simple question to put the interviewee at ease'. Mentioning your interest in Bolivian throat singing will give the interviewer ...


2

To a certain degree, I'd say Yes if your proficiency in a particular activity increases the chances you`ll be a good scientist in the field of study you are applying for. I.E. if you are applying for a Master in Aerospace Engineering having great skills in designing and building in RC models definitely shows that you are in possession of skills that can ...


2

“I don’t think it would have all got me quite so down if just once in a while—just once in a while—there was at least some polite little perfunctory implication that knowledge should lead to wisdom, and that if it doesn't, it's just a disgusting waste of time! But there never is! You never even hear any hints dropped on a campus that wisdom is supposed to be ...


2

Extracurricular service is things you do completely outside the university setting. Volunteering at a food bank or such like these days. Tutoring disadvantaged kids. The other is service given to the university and its students and staff in some way. Being chair of an admissions or hiring committee. Writing a report, or serving on a committee that is trying ...


1

Not much. They are looking for capabilities versus accomplishments. I would also add that GREs are useful.


1

In the US, and I suspect elsewhere, such things have little bearing on admissions to graduate school. People will look at your academic achievements, mostly, but not entirely, in your major subject. They are looking for evidence of academic success and want to be able to make an easy prediction about your fit into their program. It is a much more important ...


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