4

What exactly do I need to do when arxiving a accepted manuscript to an IEEE conference? Which license to select on arxiv? Do I need to add the reference/doi not only to the arxiv metadata but also the document itself?


Background.

I've a paper that has been accepted at an IEEE conference. After I've received the reviews and acceptance notice, I was asked to incorporate changes and include a copyright notice that was provided to me, something like

123-1-1234-5678-0/12/$31.00 c 2015 IEEE

I assume this last pdf then is the so-called postprint or accepted manuscript.

I want to post this on arxiv and wondered what I need to do. It seems the accepted answer to the following question does not really match my case: Conditions for uploading IEEE publications to ArXiv. Also it somewhat doesn't match An FAQ on IEEE Policy Regarding Authors Rights to Post Accepted Versions of Their Articles:

Does the policy affect how authors post their articles on preprint servers such as ArXiv? Yes. The IEEE recognizes that many authors share their unpublished articles on public sites. Once articles have been accepted for publication by IEEE, authors are required to post an IEEE copyright notice on their preprints. Upon publication, authors must replace the preprints with either 1) the full citation to the IEEE works with Digital Object Identifiers (DOI) or 2) the accepted versions only (not the IEEE-published versions) with the DOI. IEEE journals will make available to each author the accepted version of the article that the author can post that includes the DOI, IEEE copyright notice, and a notice indicating the article has been accepted for publication by IEEE. IEEE conference authors are free to post their own version of their articles, as accepted by an IEEE conference.

Which in turn is somewhat different from the information provided in An FAQ on Intellectual Property Rights for IEEE Authors:

Can an author post his manuscript on a preprint server such as ArXiv? Yes. The IEEE recognizes that many authors share their unpublished manuscripts on public sites. Once manuscripts have been accepted for publication by IEEE, an author is required to post an IEEE copyright notice on his preprint. Upon publication, the author must replace the preprint with either 1) the full citation to the IEEE work with Digital Object Identifiers (DOI) or a link to the paper’s abstract in IEEE Xplore, or 2) the accepted version only (not the IEEEpublished version), including the IEEE copyright notice and full citation, with a link to the final, published paper in IEEE Xplore.

  • What's the difference between the two? Both seem to say that you update your preprint (accepted version) with the copyright notice, citation, and link to Xplore, and post that to arXiv. – ff524 Nov 25 '15 at 19:56
  • To me it seems the first differentiates between journal and conference articles, where the latter can be arxived "as accepted by an IEEE conference" -- so in my case, the conference already asked me to include the copyright notice, but no citation or doi (or Xplore) link -- this pdf is then almost indistinguishable from the one available at Xplore... Also, what copyright should I select on arxiv? – guesttom Nov 25 '15 at 20:09
  • When it says "IEEE conference authors are free to post their own version of their articles, as accepted by an IEEE conference" it just means that the conference won't give you the version to post (as opposed to "IEEE journals will make available to each author the accepted version of the article"). As far as I can tell, the accepted answer to Conditions for uploading IEEE publications to ArXiv does match your case, and this question is a duplicate. – ff524 Nov 25 '15 at 20:18
  • I see, that's what it could mean: for conferences one needs to add that info while for journals one is provided with the pdf. I guess I disagree with that answer matching my case -- if you follow that link in that answer, it shows you a way to add footer info, yes, but looking at their output that's neither the provided copyright "123-1-1234-5678-0/12/$31.00 c 2015 IEEE" nor does it contain the full citation nor do I know where they got that sentence from.. – guesttom Nov 25 '15 at 20:23
  • this is the obvious answer, but i think you need to correspond with someone at or affiliated with the IEEE. if they want you to put a copyright notice on the arXiv copy with a price tag, they might want it behind a pay wall. – robert bristow-johnson Nov 25 '15 at 23:02
4

Here the relevant bits of a correspondence with copyrights@ieee.org.

Question:

I am having trouble understanding the policies on what exact information needs to be included in an accepted manuscript before posting it to arxiv.

Given an accepted manuscript at an IEEE conference, am I right in assuming that I need to include the following? (a) the full reference of the published version, (b) the doi linking to ieeeXplore, (c) the copyright notice as shown in 8.1.9.B, http://www.ieee.org/publications_standards/publications/rights/rights_policies.html

If yes, is there a standard procedure how to include those in a standard IEEEtran tex or does one just add them in any way convenient? If no, could you please clarify?

Note, however, that the accepted manuscript of a conference paper sometimes already contains a copyright notice of the following form "123-1-1234-5678-0/12/$31.00 c 2015 IEEE" i.e. the accepted manuscript, the version finally sent to ieee for publication and prior to copyediting etc already contains a copyright notice that is different from the one mentioned above. Would this one need to be replaced by the other one or which exact notice would need to be included?

Response:

Sorry for the delay in response. To the best of my knowledge there is no standard format to provide the information. You would need to provide the copyright notice as shown in 8.1.9.B from the PSPB Operations Manual:

“© © 20xx IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. Permission from IEEE must be obtained for all other uses, in any current or future media, including reprinting/republishing this material for advertising or promotional purposes, creating new collective works, for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or reuse of any copyrighted component of this work in other works.”

Not sure this really clarifies the situation..?

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.