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I am being stalked by someone who probably poses no physical threat to me, but his actions were concerning enough that we filed a police report, and the dean of students moved me to different housing.

Do you think it is worth taking my academic website off the Internet? With my publication list, my stalker could find the names of my collaborators, and the name of my PhD advisor (who already knows about the situation). There is a tiny chance he might contact some of them.

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    This is a generic question, not specific to academia. Seems off-topic here. Even if the purpose is to hide your affiliation. – smci Sep 15 '15 at 22:55
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There's a small chance it might help but probably not.

If your page has been on the internet for any length of time then it's already going to be stored in a number of library archives like archive.org

It's possible to remove pages from the site but it takes time and there are other archives.

Example:

http://web.archive.org/web/20141124181833/http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/12-591-x/2009001/02-step-etape/ex/ex-publication-eng.htm

Also your publications are likely to be searchable through a number of online systems for finding papers such as google scholar.

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    Also your publications are likely to be searchable through a number of online systems for finding papers such as google scholar. – Unless there are several people with your exact name and exact affiliations, that’s not likely, that’s certain. I can obtain a list of my publications just by entering my last name and city into Google Scholar. This is the most important argument in my opinion: That information is on the Internet anyway. “Small chance” is way exaggerated. – Wrzlprmft Sep 15 '15 at 20:54

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