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I found an (already published) paper that cites a paper of mine, but without inserting even the arXiv link (the paper is still in press). In this way, I lose one citation.

Is it possible for me to write the journal asking them to fix the problem?

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  • I don't understand the question. How exactly did the paper cite your manuscript? Mar 11 at 16:17
  • @WolfgangBangerth my paper is in press and I still have not a DOI. So they cite it as Author, title, Name of the journal, (in press) without adding the link from arxiv.
    – User1010
    Mar 12 at 8:02
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    That's the way it is done. You can't be mad at the authors. Mar 13 at 2:59
  • @WolfgangBangerth it is the way? Not adding the arxiv link even if it exist?
    – User1010
    Mar 13 at 21:52
  • arXiv is a construct of the last ten years. Before that, you would at the very best have gotten the citation you got. Twenty years ago, nobody would have known about your paper to begin with. So historically, you're already on the positive side. Now, that's not a good argument to make, but I think the authors did what they were supposed to: They helped their readers to find related literature. An author does not have a responsibility to provide other authors with citations. (Separately, though: Let it go. It's a single citation. You will over the course of your career accumulate thousands.) Mar 14 at 18:10

1 Answer 1

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I will start with this:

Moreover, the citations on papers on arxiv count as an effective citation?

The answer to this cannot be objective. Different people (senior researchers) will give different answers depending on their research philosophy. Similarly, different bibliographic indices do (e.g. Google scholar consider the citations but others do not).

There are no standard rules obliging authors how to mention their references but I think most of the publishers (big ones especially) are keen to link the references to their sources. For some of my publications, I got contacted by the publisher before publishing my paper to fix a reference input because they were not able to link it.

In summary, I think there is no harm to contacting the journal asking to link the reference to your paper but you cannot contact every bibliographic index to do the same thing (e.g. Google Scholar, researchgrate, etc). Note that each of these indices has its own algorithm of linking papers to their citations (e.g. Google Scholar consider them non-source items and you can add it manually but I am not sure about the others). On the other side, you cannot track every citation and I think it is much better to invest time in making new publications that are worth citing.

In the future, you can improve the accessibility of your papers by publishing codes, data, etc. and using public repositories.

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    "In the future, you can improve the accessibility of your papers by [...] using public repositories" like Arxiv, which OP did use? Mar 11 at 8:09
  • I meant like github and gitlab. Note always we search for papers but for easy to use tools, codes and data
    – Younes
    Mar 11 at 8:28
  • @Younes thank you for the answer. I know the author personally. If I say it to him (and he accepts to add the arxiv link) even if he can not modify the already published paper, can he at least modify the version on google scholar? And then I would have my citation?
    – User1010
    Mar 11 at 8:54
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    @User1010 I am not sure but I think you can do it yourself in google scholar: You suggest linking a paper to its reference source.
    – Younes
    Mar 11 at 9:20
  • @Younes yes. Do you know how to do this? Thank you in advance!
    – User1010
    Mar 12 at 8:02

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