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Unfortunately, I made a mistake in writing my academic affiliation (the format of my affiliation is incorrect: instead of University of X, I wrote X University), which makes my paper not to be accepted by the university. One of the papers with this incorrect format is published about 2 weeks ago and on of them has been published online. Will the journal correct it after the paper is published or published online if I send an email about this issue?

p.s., Unfortunately in my country (English is not the first language), the university does not accept my paper and I may lose my job. This wrong affiliation means I will lose almost 2 years of my attempt.

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    First, inform the editor(s) about the situation and about the importance of the problem. Your "p.s." changes the picture greatly, so don't wait for the editor to think the error is minor. Second, if the affiliations cannot be corrected and if your university administration can't be persuaded to be reasonable, then you may need the help of a lawyer. Oct 25, 2021 at 18:28
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    @AndreasBlass Sure, I'll let them know about the importance of the issue. I desperately hope they will accept to change it.
    – Kheeyal
    Oct 25, 2021 at 18:42

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The journal isn't going to know about it and publish it exactly as you wrote it. If you want it fixed, you will need to tell them about it.

At the same time, the right approach is to just not worry about it. It is clear to everyone that "University of X" and "X University" are the same, in particular for universities in countries in which English is not the first language. In that case, the actual name of the university has to be translated anyway, and "University of X" and "X University" are both correct translations.

In other words, just let it be. The stating the affiliation of authors is intended to allow others to contact you. Whether they address a letter to "Kheeyal, University of X" or "Kheeyal, X University" doesn't matter: Both letters will find their way into your mailbox.

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    Thank you very much. But unfortunately in my country (English is not the first language), the university does not accept my paper and I may lose my job. This wrong affiliation means I will lose almost 2 years of my attempt.
    – Kheeyal
    Oct 25, 2021 at 17:49
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    Miami University is quite distinct from the University of Miami. The former is in Ohio and the latter in Florida. Oct 25, 2021 at 18:25
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    @Kheeyal Well, that makes no sense at all. But if that's how it is, write to the editor-in-chief of the paper and explain the situation. Oct 25, 2021 at 19:01
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    @WolfgangBangerth - I have seen something similar. You can not claim to be familiar with the laws of all countries in the world. Some of them are weird and cruel.
    – Robin
    Oct 25, 2021 at 19:31
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    Fair enough. I still think that a letter that also includes the city/state/zip code is going to find its way, and as such the misspelled affiliation should not lead to misunderstandings. But I get the point. I still think it's petty for administrators to be unwilling to count such publications, and I'm going to insist on that latter point: It's petty. Oct 25, 2021 at 21:03

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