We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.
4 replaced http://academia.stackexchange.com/ with https://academia.stackexchange.com/
source | link

There is a story on Inside Higher Ed (based on this blog post) about a candidate who received a tenure-track offer from a U.S. philosophy department.

She emailed the search committee with some requests related to: salary, maternity leave, sabbatical, teaching load, and start date. Her email ended with "I know that some of these might be easier to grant than others. Let me know what you think." In response, the institution withdrew the offer, saying that her requests revealed that she wasn't a good fit for a teaching institution.

Many of the comments on the IHE story or blog post are in support of the school, saying such things as:

  • The candidate asked for too much and came across as "entitled"
  • The candidate shouldn't have requested a light teaching load initially, when the school in question is a teaching institution
  • The candidate shouldn't have asked about a pre-tenure sabbatical, which is apparently unheard of at teaching institutions

In particular, one comment says this:

indicates how important it is to do your best to understand the culture and needs of the hiring institution, both before and during negotiations

and another that it is

an example of knowing the difference between negotiating with a research school and with a small teaching school

There have been quitequite a fewa few questionsquestions on this site about negotiating a startup package, but these mostly describe the various things you can ask for, and which are likely to have more "wiggle room." Most of the U.S. faculty who answered those are at research institutions, and they suggest that

It's perfectly reasonable to ask for anything

and

Definitely ask for all that you need, and let them whittle you down.

Apparently, that advice may be more or less applicable depending on the type and culture of the institution. My questions are:

Are there really different norms with respect to negotiation in a teaching vs. research institution? What are they?

and, more generally,

What can I do pre-offer to get a sense for what the institution's culture is, and what I can reasonably ask for?

Possibly, the candidate in the story came from a research institution, got advice from her advisor there on negotiation, and never realized that her requests would be perceived poorly at a teaching institution. What could she have done differently?

I am especially interested in a response from anyone who's been on a search committee at both kinds of institutions (though I don't know if we have anyone like that on this site).

There is a story on Inside Higher Ed (based on this blog post) about a candidate who received a tenure-track offer from a U.S. philosophy department.

She emailed the search committee with some requests related to: salary, maternity leave, sabbatical, teaching load, and start date. Her email ended with "I know that some of these might be easier to grant than others. Let me know what you think." In response, the institution withdrew the offer, saying that her requests revealed that she wasn't a good fit for a teaching institution.

Many of the comments on the IHE story or blog post are in support of the school, saying such things as:

  • The candidate asked for too much and came across as "entitled"
  • The candidate shouldn't have requested a light teaching load initially, when the school in question is a teaching institution
  • The candidate shouldn't have asked about a pre-tenure sabbatical, which is apparently unheard of at teaching institutions

In particular, one comment says this:

indicates how important it is to do your best to understand the culture and needs of the hiring institution, both before and during negotiations

and another that it is

an example of knowing the difference between negotiating with a research school and with a small teaching school

There have been quite a few questions on this site about negotiating a startup package, but these mostly describe the various things you can ask for, and which are likely to have more "wiggle room." Most of the U.S. faculty who answered those are at research institutions, and they suggest that

It's perfectly reasonable to ask for anything

and

Definitely ask for all that you need, and let them whittle you down.

Apparently, that advice may be more or less applicable depending on the type and culture of the institution. My questions are:

Are there really different norms with respect to negotiation in a teaching vs. research institution? What are they?

and, more generally,

What can I do pre-offer to get a sense for what the institution's culture is, and what I can reasonably ask for?

Possibly, the candidate in the story came from a research institution, got advice from her advisor there on negotiation, and never realized that her requests would be perceived poorly at a teaching institution. What could she have done differently?

I am especially interested in a response from anyone who's been on a search committee at both kinds of institutions (though I don't know if we have anyone like that on this site).

There is a story on Inside Higher Ed (based on this blog post) about a candidate who received a tenure-track offer from a U.S. philosophy department.

She emailed the search committee with some requests related to: salary, maternity leave, sabbatical, teaching load, and start date. Her email ended with "I know that some of these might be easier to grant than others. Let me know what you think." In response, the institution withdrew the offer, saying that her requests revealed that she wasn't a good fit for a teaching institution.

Many of the comments on the IHE story or blog post are in support of the school, saying such things as:

  • The candidate asked for too much and came across as "entitled"
  • The candidate shouldn't have requested a light teaching load initially, when the school in question is a teaching institution
  • The candidate shouldn't have asked about a pre-tenure sabbatical, which is apparently unheard of at teaching institutions

In particular, one comment says this:

indicates how important it is to do your best to understand the culture and needs of the hiring institution, both before and during negotiations

and another that it is

an example of knowing the difference between negotiating with a research school and with a small teaching school

There have been quite a few questions on this site about negotiating a startup package, but these mostly describe the various things you can ask for, and which are likely to have more "wiggle room." Most of the U.S. faculty who answered those are at research institutions, and they suggest that

It's perfectly reasonable to ask for anything

and

Definitely ask for all that you need, and let them whittle you down.

Apparently, that advice may be more or less applicable depending on the type and culture of the institution. My questions are:

Are there really different norms with respect to negotiation in a teaching vs. research institution? What are they?

and, more generally,

What can I do pre-offer to get a sense for what the institution's culture is, and what I can reasonably ask for?

Possibly, the candidate in the story came from a research institution, got advice from her advisor there on negotiation, and never realized that her requests would be perceived poorly at a teaching institution. What could she have done differently?

I am especially interested in a response from anyone who's been on a search committee at both kinds of institutions (though I don't know if we have anyone like that on this site).

3 edited tags
| link
2 made title more reflective of contents
| link

Difference in culture between negotiating Negotiating startup package at teaching vs. research universitygiven differences in institutional norms

    Tweeted twitter.com/#!/StackAcademia/status/444331770188947456
1
source | link