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I am from india. I have a strong desire to pursue Masters in Computer Science in USA. I enjoy academia. However, I am sure that I do not want to pursue a Phd and also not attracted towards an IT Career.

I understand that teaching positions are mostly reserved for full-time Phd holders and is getting increasingly tough. So how difficult it will be, post MS, for an international applicant to secure a full time instructor job? I do not want an adjunct position as I can't survive travelling from university to university. What other degrees/certificates can help tip the scales in my favour?

I have seen certain Master students get a faculty position in the university itself where they completed the course.

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I understand that teaching positions are mostly reserved for Full time Phd Holders and is getting increasingly tough. So how difficult it will be, post MS, for an international applicant to secure a full time instructor job.

In the US, community colleges (i.e., two-year colleges) sometimes hire faculty with master's degrees. At four-year colleges and universities, it's basically impossible to get a regular faculty position without a Ph.D. (It might theoretically be possible, but only under extraordinary circumstances, for example a pioneering industrial researcher who never completed a Ph.D.)

So that means you would have to target community colleges. How difficult that would be depends on the circumstances, and it's important not to assume it's easy to get such a job just because the institution is less prestigious. I don't think you'll be able to get a full-time instructor position without some prior teaching experience, since you'll need to demonstrate your teaching abilities.

Being an international applicant shouldn't be a big deal overall (assuming you have authorization to work in the U.S.; see Paul Garrett's comment below), but it may come up in several ways, such as English proficiency. The most annoying may be that teaching experience is other countries is sometimes not taken as seriously. It can be difficult for evaluate for people unfamiliar with the system it took place in, and it may involve students who are very different from typical U.S. college students.

I have seen certain Master students get a faculty position in the uni itself where they completed the course.

I've never seen that happen for a regular faculty position in the U.S. Occasionally, a master's student may be kept around for a while as an adjunct to teach low-level courses nobody else wants to teach, but this is generally not a well-paid or respected position. Someone with truly exceptional teaching skills might be retained long-term in a position with a title like "senior lecturer with security of employment" (not a regular faculty member but reasonably paid and without fear of abruptly being fired), but there are not many such positions and they are not easy to get.

What other degrees/certificates can help tip the scales in my favour?

I don't think any other degree or certificate will play an important role. If you find an opening for which the hiring committee genuinely doesn't care about having a Ph.D., then teaching effectiveness will be the primary criterion. Any evidence of excellent teaching will be helpful, but other degrees or certificates are not generally a compelling form of evidence.

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    There is the issue of the appropriate visa, also. The bureacratic process is not trivial, is not cheap, and universities (in contrast what I gather is typical for community colleges) usually take care of it for postdocs and faculty from abroad. – paul garrett Jan 22 '15 at 17:43
  • I dint get your point completely. Are you saying that the community college/universities might not sponsor a visa for an international faculty(Post MS). – srkmish Jan 23 '15 at 17:29
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    @paulgarrett What you wrote is usually, but not always correct. I know someone whose first job after his Ph.D. was at a large, respected, research university, which messed up his visa process so badly that he had to leave the U.S. for some months. He then got a job at a community college, which arranged for his visa without any problems. – Andreas Blass Jan 24 '15 at 15:30
  • srkmish, based on observation (but with disclaimer in line with @AndreasBlass' comment), "research universities" are more accustomed to the visa process, since international scholars are usual. In contrast (at least in the past), community colleges mostly hired "local" people, so visas were rarely an issue. Either way, there needs to be sufficient incentive for the institution to take the trouble and expense (which are not zero...) – paul garrett Jan 24 '15 at 16:10
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You're in luck! International students do it all the time!

First, I recommend ignoring community colleges. You won't be able to successfully pursue your masters there.

Second, how good is your English? It's potentially the largest contributing factor to landing a teaching position. If you haven't already, practice speaking with people outside of India to get a gauge of your proficiency.

Third, find a few large four-year universities that grant master level degrees. Apply, and enqire about employment. What you're looking for is a Graduate Teaching Assistantship (GTA) position. Now, it isn't great pay - it'll cover rent and groceries... typically with a little left over each month. The great deal though is that they usually come with waived tuition in exchange for your working.

So you get paid, reduced (if not free) tuition - and you get to complete a masters!

Source: I'm a masters student that teachers introductory computer science. I'm not Indian - but I work with quite a few!

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    It sounds like the OP is asking about permanent jobs after finishing the masters degree. A GTA position is only for students still in grad school. – Nate Eldredge Jan 24 '15 at 14:42
  • Ahh your are correct, I missed the post MS part. – Ramrod Jan 24 '15 at 16:28

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