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As with many research databases, the Wiley Online Library lets you export citations to plain text.

Here is a example for the article, The “Front Porch”: Examining the Increasing Interconnection of University and Athletic Department Funding (doi 10.1002/aehe.20023).

The plain text export has a vertical list of the fields with the citation specifics and other information. The fields (field names, metadata, other? - not sure what to call these) are denoted in two characters. In the example, the capital letters were shown in the export (e.g., TY) and the bracketed words are what I think the intended meanings are (e.g., TY = [type]).

TY [type] - JOUR [journal]
AU [author] - Bass, Jordan R.
AU [author] - Schaeperkoetter, Claire C.
AU [author] - Bunds, Kyle S.
TI [title]  - The “Front Porch”: Examining the Increasing Interconnection of University and 
Athletic Department Funding
JO [journal name] - ASHE Higher Education Report
JA [journal name abbreviation] - ASHE High. Edu. Rept.
VL [volume]  - 41
IS [issue] - 5
SN [international standard serial number (similar to ISBN for a book)] - 1551-6970
UR [URL] - https://doi.org/10.1002/aehe.20023
DO [DOI] - https://doi.org/10.1002/aehe.20023
SP [start page]  - 1
EP [end page] - 103
PY [publication year] - 2015
ER [electronic resource] - 

Question: Have I assigned the correct meanings to SN and ER?

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  • 1
    SN=ISSN seems correct
    – BrtH
    Jun 8 at 22:00
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It looks like they output the citation in the RIS file format. There's a list of allowed two-character tags on Wikipedia. The SN tag can be used for either ISBN or ISSN, I guess depending on context. In the RIS format, the ER tag stands for "End of Reference", not "electronic resource". It must be empty and placed last, whereas TY must be the first tag.

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  • 1
    Was just about to post the same.
    – shoover
    Jun 8 at 23:57
  • @Anyon - I've seen "RIS format" as a choice before, but had never investigated it. The Wikipedia link was high-value information due to long list of tags with descriptions (it's a keeper).
    – RJo
    Jun 10 at 14:20

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