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What software can I use to create pdf version of my PowerPoint presentation slides? My PowerPoint slides have animations, where multiple pictures are shown on one slide. When I use export pdf from the Microsoft office software, it shows just the last animated image for a slide. I want the animation images to be on different pages. Any software preferably open-source for mac ? Even windows software would do.

  • When you say 'dynamic' you mean static slides with different parts of the 'animation build stages' or do you mean truly dynamic with actual videos and animations? (Yes, the latter is technically the same as the former. But even the fastest presenter is rarely doing 24fps...) – user2705196 Sep 1 at 10:33
  • @user2705196 I would be happy with the first option, but is the procedure for doing the latter same as the first one? Any resource you can point me to about the same? – cvhs Sep 1 at 10:39
  • Embedding a video is hard. But separate stages is easy (see below). – user2705196 Sep 1 at 11:04
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    @user2705196 I've been in a few talks that felt like they went at 24fps... – avid Sep 1 at 12:47
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Keynote is a free app on your a Mac (it can handle Microsoft PPT files, but it doesn't always lead to 100% satisfactory outcomes -- you will have to check your case by hand).

In Keynote there's a setting 'make separate slide for each build stage' when you export your presentation as a PDF.

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Apart from preaching that beamer is better than ppt ;), I highly recommend the PPspliT plugin for powerpoint

https://www.maxonthenet.altervista.org/ppsplit.php

It is a straightforward solution to create a new slide after each animation, and then exporting it as a pdf.

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    Beamer is nice in theory, but it encourages antipatterns. I have yet to see a beamer presentation that's not just a bunch of bullet points. – henning -- reinstate Monica Sep 1 at 11:16
  • @henning--reinstateMonica depends of how fancy you'd want the animations to be. I was (semi-)joking of course, if the image/formula ratio is high, ppt will probably be faster. But there are nice possibilities also such as dynamically adding lines on a TikZ plot – Wouter Sep 1 at 11:30
  • I have seen several sources recommend this, but when I tried using it some time ago it ended up garbling all animations involving equations. I guess it works well for simpler cases. – GoodDeeds Sep 1 at 12:13

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