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PhD Student : Publish Paper with Wife?
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219 votes

Nobody will notice or care, unless you share a last name with your wife, in which case the strongest reaction is likely to be, "aw how cute, a husband and wife published a paper together."

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Should I simply ignore it if authors assume that I'm male in their response to my review of their article?
96 votes

Just drop it. There are places where it's entirely reasonable for a scholar to start a discussion with a colleague about politically-charged, potentially-inflammatory topics such as microagressions, ...

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Reviewer wants me to do massive amount of work, the result would be a different article. Should I tell that to the editor?
57 votes

I've been R2 a few times: I consider the paper's quality clearly below the standards of the journal (because of lack of detail, for instance, to the point where I can't fully understand the paper's ...

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Professors/Teachers only replying to part of my email
48 votes

I've been guilty of this kind of thing. The emails I receive can be roughly taxonomized into two categories: A. Those I can quickly answer while waiting in line at Starbucks, sitting on the bus, ...

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What percentage of PhD theses are rejected nowadays?
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36 votes

I'm only personally aware of one student who failed his PhD defense (this is at an R1 US university). After his advisor refused to approve his thesis, he went over his head and got the department ...

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Under which conditions can a person use the title of "Professor"?
26 votes

I'm at a North American R1. The water is a bit muddy because depending on context "Professor" can refer to different things: a formal job title, specified in your employment contract (this ...

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PhD thesis without acknowledgements
23 votes

As an addendum to the above, I have yet to meet any PhD student who defended without at some point coming "close to falling out" with their advisor. As PhD programs last longer than many marriages, ...

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Why do many talented scientists write horrible software?
13 votes

Why didn't Roald Amundsen pave a highway to the South Pole? Why didn't Edmund Hillary build a ski lift on his way up Mount Everest? The job of academics is to find solutions to problems previously ...

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How much detail to include for an award listed on a CV
12 votes

I would go so far as to give the opposite of Dan C's advice: the more prestigious the award, the less detail you need to provide. If you won the NSF fellowship or the Hertz, or got best paper at your ...

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Will I destroy my career if I published a paper with a serious mistake?
9 votes

Probably not. The "mortal sins" you definitely want to avoid are plagiarism and fabrication. Hopefully your supervisor has explained to you the ethics of scientific research, so that there is no ...

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Is it possible to fast track the tenure process?
8 votes

Every university will be different, both in terms of the "default" tenure clock as well as the mechanisms for going up for tenure early. At my university, it is possible to apply early for ...

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First authorship dispute
8 votes

Unfortunately there is not much you can do -- you can try to get the editor of the journal involved, but it is almost certain that the editor will not involve themselves in authorship disputes that ...

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How detailed should my review of a very poorly-written manuscript be?
5 votes

I stopped pointing out spelling and grammar errors midway through grad school. These days I'll give a one-sentence summary of the state of the writing, with an exhortation to do a thorough editing ...

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When writing a peer review is it better protocol to quote parts of the orginal work or paraphrase?
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5 votes

It depends why you are quoting/paraphrasing. Usually I structure my review in two parts. The first part summarizes the paper, the major contributions, and the high-level strengths and weaknesses of ...

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How concerned should one be if he/she does not get referee invitations?
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4 votes

Your friend might be on a specific editor's blacklist, if she has engaged in poor reviewer behavior with that editor (submitted very short or low-quality reviews; accepted reviews for which she has a ...

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How can PhD student repair relationship with supervisor after PhD student engages in independent research without supervisor?
4 votes

I will throw out another opinion here: if your supervisor was paying you to work on his research agenda, it is unethical and unprofessional to instead work on something different without telling him. ...

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Do US universities use GPA according to transcript evaluation services or internal evaluation?
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4 votes

Every school does admissions in a different way, so it's hard to say, but I've never heard of anyone using any external services to evaluate transcripts. I'd say send in your application, and let the ...

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About email contact with prospective advisors who are yet to join the institute
4 votes

Understand that faculty, even junior faculty, can get over a hundred emails a day, and even dealing with only the most urgent of these, such as Bureaucracy from the department chair / funding agency ...

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Is participating in open peer reviewing good or bad for early career scientists?
3 votes

Best case scenario: influential members of your research community see your review, and conclude (1) you are a good community citizen and do your fair share of paper reviewing; (2) you are a ...

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How to address professors in emails?
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3 votes

If in doubt, "Prof. Lastname" is always appropriate for an undergraduate addressing a professor. I sign all of my emails with my first name, but would find it quite strange if an undergraduate ...

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Overcoming nerves from anticipating conference questions
3 votes

Most of the questions you'll receive will either 1) ask for clarification about your methodology/results, or 2) suggest avenues of future work. Questions of the first kind are usually very easy (...

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Does membership of academic honour societies carry any professional weight / recognition?
3 votes

Listing "prestigious" societies like Phi Beta Kappa or Tau Beta Pi is perfectly acceptable. While it probably won't do a whole lot of good, it also won't do any harm. Do avoid listing any societies ...

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Is it a bad idea to ask professors questions weeks before the class starts?
2 votes

I agree with the other answers---professors are extremely pinched for time and wasting their time is one of the best ways to make a negative impression. If you want to build a relationship with this ...

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Is it unreasonable to change the rules of a quiz/exam one week in advance?
2 votes

Contrary opinion: you should (and at many universities, must) stick to whatever you wrote in the course syllabus. Everything else is up to you. You're the expert on how to make your course as ...

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How to make improvements to an already-published paper?
2 votes

I would recommend putting the new material in a tech report, and publishing it alongside your original paper on your website. This establishes prior art and makes the improvements available to other ...

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How important are my grades to the rest of my PhD career?
2 votes

You may need good grades during the first two years of your PhD (the time you would be doing your MS, if you applied to a separate MS program) for the reasons listed above: fellowships, in case you ...

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Where is your line with students on social media?
1 votes

The only hard and fast rules I keep to in regards to social media are: I don't conduct any school business whatsoever over social media. If students have questions about class material, grading, etc. ...

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Is it unwise to contact the professor directly before getting admitted to a program in US?
1 votes

I am a computer science professor and I agree that this advice is not entirely correct. It's true that you should never spam a whole bunch of professors at random asking them to look at your CV / ...

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Should I share my horrible software?
0 votes

Put up a disclaimer that the code is provided "as is" with no promises of support, etc. And then share the code. Case study: Turning a cloud of isolated points into a watertight surface is an ...

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