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37

Yes, with a caveat: make sure that the hyperrefs don't include any information that can't be gleaned from the text itself. For example, a common mistake is to use \href to hide a URL, as in: Our tool is available online \href{http://www.github.com/some/repo/}{here}. This is acceptable on websites but not in a paper because if the paper is printed, the URL ...


29

Yes: They help navigate the document. (Except if the conference forbids them, then no.)


4

I have worked in similar cross-platform teams. Mine in the past was more Latex on Linux with bibtex versus Microsoft Word on Windows with Zotero. In that case, we were working on multiple papers together, so our policy was that everyone went along with the tool that the first author preferred, so we all got a lot of cross-platform experience. That worked for ...


3

Yes, it makes sense. No, you didn't do anything wrong. Write up what you did for your thesis along with the necessary supporting material, but avoid complaining about what the institute did. I think the key misunderstanding here is that they were giving you an opportunity to interact in a real system and that they might be able to take advantage of what you ...


2

For a thesis it is normal to include a much more complete bibliography that results from a literature search. This seems to be what you are describing. However, for a paper, it is much more normal, and useful, to include only those you need to cite in the work itself; those from which the current work derives. Don't send the reader astray from the advances ...


2

I would (and have) take the answer of Tripartio a step further. Invest all of the actual formal writing of the paper in one or two people who agree to use the same tools whatever they are. Everyone else suggests updates/changes as needed, providing their comments in any suitable format. When changes are distributed to the team members they might also be ...


1

I suppose the results of your mathematical derivations matter for your paper's conclusions, not the way you derived them. The results will probably have a natural place where they belong in your paper. If the derivations are short, you can present them there. But if the derivations occupy significant space (and aren't part of your core content), presenting ...


1

Discuss your main conclusion(s) in a few sentences. Discuss the approach to the solution; the general structure of the technique. If you specialize a known technique, name the one you specialize (or generalize, perhaps). Discuss any comparisons with earlier work. You can point to various sections of the paper for details if you like.


1

This is something you should discuss with your supervisor. Conventions vary by field and venue, so your supervisor can give you more precise advice than random strangers on the internet.


1

This probably did mean the person was well read back in the day, but not so much today. Google "quotes about ___" where ___ is a generic word that pertains to your chapter and switch to image search. (Why image search? Because then you don't have to click into the results to see the quotes.) For example, "quotes about trees": From "...


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