A message from our CEO about the future of Stack Overflow and Stack Exchange. Read now.
102

If you do this for a minority, then you will have to do it every time a few students have some excuse. I suggest that you don’t consider this and make it clear that if they miss lectures then it is up to them to catch up on material. Providing double or triple repeats of lectures due to a few absences, especially if unpaid, is not a good use of your time. ...


63

Let's flip this question around and imagine that you, as a first year anthropology PhD student, are now visiting your high school. One of the students asked your former teachers if you would be interested in a local, anthropology-related research project they were doing (e.g., they could be investigating the attitudes of people towards those who are HIV ...


33

Your paper will be shepherded. The conference organizers will assign a contact person called shepherd to your paper, who guides you through a sequence of revisions (for further information, see the question mentioned by @darijgrinberg, and this question). The "accept with..." decision signals you that they really want your paper at the workshop, stronger ...


32

There is really no need to do this. Lecture is an efficient way for a single person to help a group to learn, but it isn't the most effective way for an individual to learn material. There are other ways to learn the material and they need to become familiar with them. Books, notes, discussions, but most important, exercises to make the material part of ...


13

The conference organizer thought you had enough snap to run a presentation to this august body. Given that you have a previous and good relationship with the organizer I discount that you are being set up for failure. You had planned to submit a paper. Your paper was going to be among papers of the elite. This is nerves. At the worst while speaking folks ...


13

In my experience as a conference program chair, shepherding is usually applied to borderline papers, where the chairs think the paper has valuable material but flaws too serious for publication in its current form. Assigning a shepherd for the paper means that your acceptance is conditional on revising to address those flaws. It's still good news, however,...


11

Go ahead and present (the whole point of conferences and workshops is to give and receive criticism on your and others' research) Academia should be about ideas and research, not "status". If you have good ideas and are producing good research (NB: I say "producing", which is not necessarily the same thing as "publishing"), you should not feel embarrassed. ...


8

From the comments: I provide the notes, worked example and further practice questions on Moodle for those who do, and do not, attend without fear or favour. If they choose to attend a workshop instead of your class, they are still receiving the material so are not at a disadvantage (other than missing out on what I'm sure is a superb lecture). They are ...


6

I guess I'd think about it a little differently than you did. It doesn't sound to me like your experience was so bad! I think it might be helpful just to reframe your goals. It's usually true that you won't get everything from the talks. Otherwise your classes would consist of lecture and no tests or reading! Instead of aiming to follow 100%, I focus on: ...


6

I'm assuming these are not frivolous workshops. In a large university, often one department doesn't really know what the others are doing and schedules are difficult if you want to learn stuff from multiple departments. So if these are "serious" workshops, you can be a bit accommodating. Especially since this is not an overly full class. You don't want this ...


4

Two thoughts: (1) You may be under contractual obligation to hold scheduled classes. (If so, you may want to point this out to the students if they become insistent that you cancel.) (2) It may not be fair to other students in the class to let a few students get to, in effect, cancel a class. I would tell the students that it is fine for them to attend ...


4

Other answers make excellent points, but one more that hasn’t been mentioned yet as far as I can see: Talks from junior and inexperienced researchers are very common. However eminent some of the audience members are, they’ve all seen plenty of other talks from inexperienced researchers, and they probably remember giving their own first few talks when they ...


3

Why don't you simply ask her about her willingness to be a speaker? If you explain it properly to her, I think she might see it as a nice gesture (especially if she is as helpful and intelligent as you describe). However, I personally wouldn't nominate her as a speaker without her approval, since that gives off a vibe of you deciding over her head, which you ...


3

If you think you can give a good talk, do it. If not, don't. I would lean towards don't based on the no papers and you not brimming with comments about your results within this question. The issue is not your rank or your social confidence. Just that you don't have significant things to say in real content.


3

An easy way around the problem is to record the lecture on camera.


2

I think a good approach is to just say what you do here. "We don't have more results because of time and (maybe) money." "Yes, we would like to extend the results to public hardware (assuming you do)." "I'm not convinced either until we can get the time and money to carry out the extended experiment." Your results are valid only so far as your actual ...


2

What one gets from attending conferences depends a lot on some personal factors, especially for junior researchers: some people socialize easily and can build fruitful professional relationships, some people are well organized and able to continue their regular work on their laptop while attending talks, some people are interested in almost every talk ...


2

Let me suggest that there isn't any magic answer. Certainly not for efficiency. But a few things can help. Many (most?) such groups have some leadership. Often it is a senior professor and the group consists of other professors and some students. Often the subject of the group is the main research interest of the senior professor and others are looking ...


2

Well, since papers are generally for finished work, and workshops are for improving work in progress, it might be looked at as an odd situation. If you submit a paper for what you have done already and a workshop proposal that is related, but, perhaps, an extension to the other then it would be more natural. So, in the exact form you suggest, I'd recommend ...


2

I recommend option 1, followed by a parenthetical: Colleague and Myself. "Joint presentation on cool research subject." NSF Workshop, 2019. (abstracted as: Myself, Cool research Topic) The joint presentation is the real presentation. Not the abstract. Consider that you would not list an abstract for a meeting where you bailed entirely. (Well I hope you ...


2

I think the second option is better since the abstract appeared in the proceedings. Otherwise, the first would probably be best. People searching will likely be looking for the abstract as accepted and published.


2

In theory, since your advisor agrees, there's nothing which stops you from submitting a workshop proposal as a PhD student. Your proposal will be evaluated by the conference organizers and they will decide whether they want to go forward or not with your workshop. If you submit this proposal completely on your own, I think there's a good chance that they ...


1

Does it count as having a paper That depends on the workshop. Your submission counts as a (peer-reviewed, published) paper if and only if The submission is an actual manuscript, and not just a short (few-paragraph) abstract, AND Your submission is accepted by the committee after significant review by your peers (the workshop committee) After some ...


1

I recently had the same experience. DO IT! I was invited to speak at a very prestigious international conference - by layman standard these scientists were brilliant (Spectrums of Harvard, Hopkins, Columbia, Duke faculty...) As a senior undergraduate still, they were, to say the least, intimidating to me. But what helped me the most was this: Believe that ...


1

What is the very worst that can happen? 30 minutes feels like a long talk, but it is pretty short in the grand scheme of things. Even if it's a real yawner, at worst people will use the opportunity to take a bit of a break. More likely, some people will find that it relates to what they're working on and some people won't, but that's what you always get. ...


1

Some of the most interesting and up-to-date talks at conferences are from postgrads, and for good reasons. A bit of enthusiasm always helps, but mainly it's because it's actually a talk about your research. Many of the senior people end up, despite their paper title, summarising their group's work (only slightly updated from the same conference last year ...


1

I would have thought that attendance of men at such an event is likely encouraged, not just allowed. I recently wrote up a preprint attempting to outline the achievements of twenty female mathematicians and received positive feedback from many other female mathematicians working in academia who were happy that I had made this effort and attempted to ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible