191

Plain and clear: Turn around and run. We know, of course, nothing about your actual event, but that kind of language and mindset is absolutely impossible. Unless you are trying to get into such prestigious circles, of course (what do I know, it might be an Oxford or MIT event for the "best of the best of the best" students in the world...), but you would ...


178

"We encourage all participants - male and female" There is no need to look into it further than that. They encourage you to come and you want to go. I don't see any reason why you wouldn't want to apply.


139

Should you be worried about "legal actions"? Maybe. I deem unlikely that any jurisdiction has specific laws for you not attending a workshop (of course I am not a lawyer and you never know, maybe North Korea's..). Any legal consequence must come from the agreement they make you sign, and you are at the very least entitled to see it before reaching the venue ...


135

SCAM! They avoid answering a valid legal question, try to make you feel bad for asking, and apply pressure to make you ignore the legal issue. If you run a con, that's how you do it. Bonus points for the random 24 hour time limit.


121

Yes, you are definitely welcome to attend. Looking at previous workshops in the "Young Women in..." series, you can see from the photos that some of the participants appear to be male.


91

Not only should you definitely go if you would like to, but you and other readers can use this as an interesting moment (and this is not meant as an attack on the original poster in any way) to reflect on the fact that women have experienced this 'but won't I feel like the odd one out' kind of feeling ever since they were first "technically permitted" at ...


63

Let's flip this question around and imagine that you, as a first year anthropology PhD student, are now visiting your high school. One of the students asked your former teachers if you would be interested in a local, anthropology-related research project they were doing (e.g., they could be investigating the attitudes of people towards those who are HIV ...


38

The reason why it is difficult to tell what workshops are about is because it is a catch-all category that many different types of academic meeting are labelled as. To illustrate, let me give examples of the nature of some of the events that I have attended in the last two years that all use the same word "workshop" to describe themselves: A "baby ...


36

This is indeed a reference to the Mathematisches Forschungsinstitut Oberwolfach (Oberwolfach Mathematics Research Institute), a conference center in the small German town of Oberwolfach. The Institute has developed a rather idiosyncratic style of meetings. The most common events are weeklong workshops on specific topics, whose participants are invited by ...


36

I'm not at your career stage, but I would be incensed if I got such a response. Granted, as already pointed out, your letter was sort of naive, but his level of rudeness was uncalled for. Unless this is the career opportunity of a lifetime, I would publicly withdraw. I wouldn't send the letter to him. I would withdraw by forwarding his email message to ...


33

Your paper will be shepherded. The conference organizers will assign a contact person called shepherd to your paper, who guides you through a sequence of revisions (for further information, see the question mentioned by @darijgrinberg, and this question). The "accept with..." decision signals you that they really want your paper at the workshop, stronger ...


29

A poster session is a good way to disseminate your work: but it has nothing to do with how you get credit for your work. Some computer science venues have moved to a model where papers are reviewed and accepted, but the vast majority of papers only get a poster presentation at the conference. Another model is where all accepted papers are invited to a ...


28

Aimed at a different point in the pipeline, you can try to make it more possible for speakers to accept your invitation. One step that can make a huge difference for certain people (in many cases, converting a 100% impossibility into an acceptance) is to provide resources for childcare at or near the conference. For some ideas about specific steps you can ...


28

In my research area (software engineering), points why people submit to workshops include the following: Lower barrier for acceptance: Some works are inherently hard to get accepted at top-notch venues, for example, because they are hard to evaluate properly. A paper that was rejected multiple times at higher-level venues might eventually end up at a ...


26

I am afraid that, especially for a small meeting, the variation of how many do not show up will be too large to be useful. For example, if I am organizing a 50-person event I would expect that anything from 2 to 10 would be a "normal" number of no-shows. That is, if you really can't have more than, say, 50 participants you can't really safely overbook at all....


25

The initial agreement is perhaps a bit heavy handed but not too strange and comes across a covering themselves against people who see the workshops as an opportunity to spend a few days in a hotel getting drunk. Threatening legal action for bad behaviors is understandable but it is odd that they would feel the need to make this point if it really is a ...


23

This answer is written with a background of a subfield of applied CS, where conferences are a primary venue of publications. tl;dr: Yes, it is normal. At the same time, it is unusual (though not "seen as weird") for someone to actually attend all conferences related to their field. Indeed, it can be a good idea to attend a conference simply out of interest ...


23

There are two kinds of workshops organized for women. A. One kind is a place where women can build confidence, for example, by presenting to an audience where there will be lots of supportive women in attendance. Men are welcome here if they go into it with an attitude of wanting to support the mission. B. The other kind is aimed specifically at just ...


22

It might be better if things change in the direction of making "posters" and "poster sessions" have greater weight, but, at the moment, in "research" mathematics, I fear this is not so. (This does not deny that undergrad "research" is typically showcased in exactly this way.) The questioner's potentially-cynical-sounding quoted "market analysis" is I think ...


22

I would not say it would be awkward. On the contrary, it would be very pleasing for the organization commitee that the workshop has reached beyond their targeted audience despite the title. Of course, by audience I should clear out that if you're not in the field, it would be awkward even if you were a female. But they organize a workshop to encourage ...


20

I understand your frustration, but workshops are not for seminal research. It is usually for hosting / presenting papers that cannot make it to major conferences or provide a venue for very small and specialized areas of research. This is not a bad thing. Especially in CS, papers that are technically correct and well-written sometimes get rejected in major ...


18

Creating a conference is a very worthwhile activity—however, even organizing a two-day workshop can be a logistical nightmare that requires a dedicated support staff to pull off efficiently. If you don't have it, you can still get it done, but it still requires a lot of planning and a lot of effort. I was invited to participate in the scientific committee ...


17

My personal experience (atmospheric science / remote sensing) is that poster sessions have little significance. You can present your work, maybe you will have some interesting discussions with scientists or get interesting ideas from others. In my field, posters are not peer-reviewed and virtually always accepted, if not clearly off-topic or rejected for ...


17

This idea is based purely on my own experience: As a young researcher, cost is a reasonably significant factor in deciding whether to attend a conference. In some settings the cost can be reduced if you can find someone to share a hotel room with. Finding such a person though can be difficult, particularly if there is no public list of who is attending the ...


16

I will speak toward my experience, as a poster presenter, and a poster reviewer. My experience is primarily in the domains of Epidemiology, Public Health or Medicine so take that for what you will. "Does this mean they liked my work?". It means they don't hate your work. While conferences do need people, and their only rate-limiting factor is the size of ...


16

Generally speaking it is totally fine to use or demonstrate publicly (at a conference or elsewhere) some proprietary software. Many presenters use Microsoft Windows along with Microsoft PowerPoint, and nobody ever gets into trouble. That said, if you want to be 100% sure you need to peruse the end-user license agreement (EULA), which is the contract that ...


15

They are both used (often interchangeably in my field). A plenary is a talk which does not have anything scheduled against it. A keynote is an invited talk in a conference or session.


15

In CS subfields related to HCI and related topics of communication between users and software, a workshop is almost the same as a conference, that is, there are speakers who give talks about their papers. However, the following differences can be observed: Organisational: A workshop lasts just one or half a day. A workshop is "embedded" into a conference; ...


15

I think the other answers cover the general case well, however, I can give you a more specific answer: A few years ago, I and a few colleagues were also interested in some of the talks in one of those workshops in Bonn. Since some of us were male and we missed the deadline to apply anyway, we sent the organizers a mail if we could show up anyway for one of ...


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