87

I think you should be worried that you and your colleagues might have to go without pizza the rest of the semester if you've already (unknowingly) burned through the budget, and not much else. You could also worry that in the future you'll have to go through a more formal approval process, which will probably loosen once whoever is involved in the approval ...


53

Interviewing a family member is not permitted. Yes, you should raise a complaint. Do it politely, of course. But in the end, you have to ask yourself whether or not a work group that would even try to get away with this is one you want to get involved with.


30

Yes, UK salaries are currently significantly lower than US salaries at most ranks, and don't have much room for negotiation outside of a standard range. The only exception to this is "professor" in the UK (which is often closer to distinguished professor in the US) where there's more latitude for higher salaries. One major reason for the salary gap is that ...


24

In my view it is completely misleading to compare salaries at all as you are ignoring the cost of living and other differences. You seem to be equating a UK salary with seniority based on a strict conversion to USD and seeing where that fits in the salary scale. This position is definitely a promotion. The best way that I know of to compare salaries is to ...


19

There is a UK context to this situation which others may not have picked up on, and also some researchers within UK universities may not have been exposed to the current situation within their own institution. Putting it bluntly many UK universities are under extreme financial pressures currently, due to various factors which (depending on institution) stem ...


19

A student-run seminar series that regularly attracts 30 students is something every school should be proud of. I can't imagine that there will be any discussion of official sanctions. I'm sort of amazed that the head of a UK school would personally involve themselves in anything like this. I'd encourage you to go into this meeting with a completely open ...


18

To add a bit more to the other fine answer: There is a set and published salary range for Senior Lecturer/Reader at each UK University, and they are all close to the same. At my (and other) UK Unis this is grade 9. If you search for the University in question's salary scales, you can see the grade 9 range and that is what you have to work with. They cannot ...


13

tl;dr: You parents are right. However, it is your choice to make. Professional job market is very competitive in the UK. If you are not a UK/EU citizen (which follows from your question), you need a Tier 2 visa to work in the UK. To be eligible for this visa, you need to earn a salary above certain threshold (currently £30000 per year). Also, your employer ...


12

I don't know what the numbers are for academic faculty specifically is, but the numbers for education in general is 47% (https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/trade-union-statistics-2018), and that is in line with membership within my department (STEM, Russel Group). UCU has a membership of 120,000. As well as collective bargaining on pay, conditions ...


11

From my personal experience, very unsubstantiated and anecdotal, family hire and similar conflicts of interests do still happen in UK universities. It is very frustrating and demotivating for other candidates, particularly when your skills match the job description well and you've put a lot of time and effort to prepare the application and the interview ...


9

As a PhD student, you have no official access to departmental funds. If someone has given you a departmental credit card, they shouldn't have, and they are officially to blame and will probably be in trouble (irrespective of the actual facts on the ground). Otherwise, someone, somewhere, is signing off on a form that authorizes the spend. Again, not ...


9

Your offer is made by the University, not your advisor. Someone in admissions probably messed it up, but fwiw this is neither your, nor your advisor's problem. As soon as University gave you an offer, and you met the conditions, it's legally binding. Many other answers are written under assumption that PhD is an employment and hence "probationary period&...


5

Part III of the natural sciences tripos is essentially a Master's degree: you take courses and exams and write an extended essay. The application process is completely separate to that for DAMPT PhDs (or PhDs in any other of the Cambridge physics departments). The simplest option is to do Part III and then apply for PhDs while you are doing it. It's highly ...


5

Many academics in CS publish their software and sometimes even their data, blissfully ignoring whether they are allowed to do so in their institution or not. It's unlikely to cause any trouble because institutions usually don't care too much: nobody will ever check, unless there's a potential commercial opportunity at play. However my understanding is that ...


5

Comparing salaries across the Atlantic is really difficult, because there is so much difference in what they have to cover. It's worth using a cost-of-living index from the web to compare your old and new cities, but then you need to allow for differences in Healthcare costs, education costs if you have kids, the greater level of municipal services provided ...


5

You will have to specify which country/system/subject you are talking about. In the UK a PhD is pretty much a 100% requirement in most subjects. The only exceptions to this are subject where you would be doing vocational training, such as business studies, management, nursing, perhaps even law(?) where an exceptional standing and experience in the field ...


5

To some extent, the answer is "because the statutes and ordinances say so". However: these are not 'standard' Cambridge undergraduate degrees. If you go to Cambridge and study a 3-year undergraduate programme in theology, education, music or medicine, you will graduate with a BA degree. The listed degrees are/were awarded for specific, somewhat ...


5

It's one of my nightmares as PI for this to happen. I would try to work with the professor to find a solution. Another professor might have an opening or the school might have some funded PhD positions. You don't want to go into a PhD position by force. The relationship will be toxic from the beginning. Concerning the contract, I would be very surprised if ...


4

Not just in academia, but in workplace generally, when a middle manager is not called to a meeting with his people, it spells trouble for the middle manager. Prof. Y is probably trying to understand where this budget overrun is caused and probably does not trust Prof X. Or it could simply be a case where Prof. X skipped some necessary step in securing your ...


4

[Converting a comment to an answer at the invitation of @hueblue...] I feel you are focussing on the wrong part of the issue here. It does not make sense to encourage 'management' to ignore the student representative's views; inevitably this will just create problems and bad feeling in the future, when students get the impression that their input is ignored....


4

To be blunt and clear, if your PhD topic is neither particularly novel nor of exceptional value, you are almost certainly not going to be awarded PhD funding in the Humanities in the UK: not at Oxbridge, not anywhere. It simply will not happen. PhD funding in UK humanities is limited at best, cutthroat in reality, and non-existent at worst. We have to turn ...


4

It is not true that there are no research only academic posts. There are post-doctoral researchers, research assistants and research only professors in many places within the UK academic system. There are also research institutes outside universities and affiliated with universities who wholly perform research. It's just that there are fewer advertisements ...


4

I would like to start applying for post-doctoral fellowship but I am still writing my thesis, is that acceptable? Yes, assuming you can plausibly start on time. Starting a bit late is also largely acceptable.


4

(Nearly) all UK universities want to signal that they take teaching seriously, both for student recruitment and for the TEF, for the obvious financial reasons. For this reason new faculty are typically required to undergo training to reach a qualification that either leads to an HEA fellowship or is equivalent to it. Thus HEA fellowships are the national ...


4

As for all CVs, they get less important in time. If you're applying for graduate study straight after undergraduate, they're good to list. Your acheivements at this point are likely to be from academic performance, rather than from independent work. When you've completed the graduate programme, no one will care that you came top in Module X in your second ...


4

Any clues what I should expect and how I should prepare? How much can they rip me apart in 30 mins? My number one tip: don't go into it expecting to be ripped apart, they're academics, not leopards! :) Seriously, though, every PhD interview I had (UK, cosmology, three years ago) was very friendly and relatively informal. Some were more informal than ...


4

I wouldn't expect your degree in computing from three decades ago to have much impact on your application for a postgraduate degree. You can confirm by contacting a perspective university. (I doubt university websites will be particularly useful, since they probably won't consider your situation.)


4

Unlike some other countries, in the UK the supervisors do not have a lot of say in questions related to admissions and funding. Admissions are subject to university rules and these rules are rarely flexible, even if your potential supervisor really strongly supports your application. A student who does not meet minimal requirements is unlikely to be admitted ...


4

In all questions like this the appropriate course of action is to contact the people who run the application process and ask. They will be able to give you the appropriate instructions taking into account all the details we don't know. E.g. can you even leave it blank, is there an automated system, does it even matter for the ones that do have a grade etc.?


3

This is going to be very field dependent. What follows will be applicable in the life sciences: There are positions at research institutes that offer the chance to do independent research without teaching duties, but they are few and far between. They are most people's dream position and competition is particularly fierce. However, I wouldn't feel to ...


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