A message from our CEO about the future of Stack Overflow and Stack Exchange. Read now.
29

Yes, UK salaries are currently significantly lower than US salaries at most ranks, and don't have much room for negotiation outside of a standard range. The only exception to this is "professor" in the UK (which is often closer to distinguished professor in the US) where there's more latitude for higher salaries. One major reason for the salary gap is that ...


23

In my view it is completely misleading to compare salaries at all as you are ignoring the cost of living and other differences. You seem to be equating a UK salary with seniority based on a strict conversion to USD and seeing where that fits in the salary scale. This position is definitely a promotion. The best way that I know of to compare salaries is to ...


17

To add a bit more to the other fine answer: There is a set and published salary range for Senior Lecturer/Reader at each UK University, and they are all close to the same. At my (and other) UK Unis this is grade 9. If you search for the University in question's salary scales, you can see the grade 9 range and that is what you have to work with. They cannot ...


5

Comparing salaries across the Atlantic is really difficult, because there is so much difference in what they have to cover. It's worth using a cost-of-living index from the web to compare your old and new cities, but then you need to allow for differences in Healthcare costs, education costs if you have kids, the greater level of municipal services provided ...


4

As for all CVs, they get less important in time. If you're applying for graduate study straight after undergraduate, they're good to list. Your acheivements at this point are likely to be from academic performance, rather than from independent work. When you've completed the graduate programme, no one will care that you came top in Module X in your second ...


3

A department will only issue one best MSc dissertation and top of year award per year. Perhaps even to the same student. So, the number of such awards are scarce and shouldn't be expected of every student. Of course, lesser awards, such as top mark in a certain module, are more common, but they're less prestigious and may be omitted. Scholarships or fee ...


3

I can only answer for biological sciences: Universities will have something along the lines of a "Workload Allocation Model" system for dividing up work. Under our departments accounting you get 3 hours prep time for every formal teaching session you give, plus 20 minutes for every exam script you mark. Tutorials don't count as "formal teaching sessions" ...


2

The Italian equivalent of 2:1 is actually 100/110 - 104/110 according to Ca' Foscari University's website. However, in the University of Torino, a 2:1 (3.5-4.49 on a 5 point scale), translates to 70% - 89% on the 100th and 77-98 on the 110th. I was denied admission because I didn't score 90% on the 100th or 100 on the 110th. https://www.unive.it/pag/...


2

Your observation is contradicted by virtually every researcher's CV I get when assessing grant proposals (natural sciences). People list their prizes as appropriate for their level (a professor will not list anything that happened during undergraduate studies, for example). The CV of Ulrich Schubert is quite representative here. As he is one of the most ...


1

This isn't true. Awards such as top of the class ("Bronze Tablets") are often listed by the GPA under the "education" heading. Undergraduates, especially in engineering, will often include "relevant" or "selected" course work that will highlight interesting projects.


1

From my very limited experience, I would say universities that participate in TEF would care about having academic staff with HEA fellowships (and there are many levels of fellowship). In my view, getting one will only work in your advantage. For what it is worth, I have been asked about having/willing to get the accreditation during job interviews, so I ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible