87

First, there’s some important background information to consider about professors, which is that they are human and occasionally make mistakes just like everyone else. In particular, as can happen to anyone in any other workplace or general life context, they may sometimes forget what they said to whom and when, or say something they didn’t fully intend, e.g....


63

If a professor at a university explicitly states an exam will contain "multiple choice questions and true/false questions" What you described they said is not the same as if they had said "The exam will be 100 percent multiple choice questions." So I think having 20% not multiple choice questions is perfectly fine.


13

You should do none of these things and we should not all be scared. This would be panic reaction. You have not said in which country you are studying, but the Health authorities of most governments have issued official advice to their citizens which you should follow. Most institutions, such as universities, will also have issued official advice which you ...


10

Firstly, wait until your professor gets back to you. As Dan Romik says above, it could've just been an honest mistake - either on your part or on the professor's. Secondly, you might want to ask other students about the exam. Did they feel blindsided as well? Did they know there would be short-answer questions? Take their answers into consideration. ...


8

There is another aspect that may be at play here -- the professor may have announced in good faith that the exam would be 100% multiple choice, and possibly even created such an exam, and then learned that departmental guidelines don't allow such easy exams for a course at this level. They would then have a variety of suboptimal ways to solve the problem; ...


6

If you have a special need, such as an immune deficiency, and must avoid all potential sources of infection, then your university will probably have some procedures to accommodate you. If you have deep psychological fears of disease then your university may have a counseling office to help you deal with your fears. Otherwise, the other answers here, ...


5

It seems like a mistake (if everything you write is accurate). I would probably consider "unethical" (this word gets used too often here...) to willingly lie to students, but that is not what is going on here. It is reasonable to make a complaint, in my view. The complaint will be discussed internally. Don't expect that this complaint will have a visible ...


4

I believe the question here masks an even more serious problem. "Why was a sample-paper not provided in the first place?" I 100% agree with the student's assessment that the format of an exam is absolutely critical knowledge which largely dictates the type of preparation for that exam. I 100% disagree with the (in my opinion naive) comments above that "...


4

"We should all be scared" [citation needed] However, some concern is reasonable. For this reason it is likely that your university has developed policies around this topic. Ask your contact point at the university (e.g. a student service centre or similar). Please be careful to avoid racism against people who look Asian.


3

Yes, they will look bad unless the university replaces the old grade with the new one as some do. And if you continue to get poor grades in important courses it will look worse. But there are a number of other factors that people might consider, provided you can get them to look at an application. First, starting out on the wrong foot isn't uncommon. Nor ...


3

Usually a BSc would suffice. This is because PhDs in the US typically contain 2-3 years of lectures, coursework and exams before you do any research. This is the equivalent of doing a separate Master's (and indeed, many students pick up a Master's degree on the way to the PhD, almost by default). In the European system, PhD students start research from day ...


3

Sounds like you're in a course which is grading on a curve. The idea here is that everyone's score is going to fit a Bell curve with a predetermined mean. This means there won't be any "Christmas-comes-early" results where everyone scores A's, but also no "what-the-hell-everyone-is-failing" panic attacks either. Grade inflation is unlikely in a class that's ...


3

I would say no. Just because the professor told you that there would be certain types of questions on the exam, unless he specifically stated that there would not be other types then he did not misrepresent the exam at all. As long as there existed multiple choice and true/false questions in the exam then he in fact told the truth. This situation varies ...


3

I do think this could be ground to consider a complaint, although not because of ethics, but because of correctness. If the official description of the course stated that the exam would contain multiple choice questions and true/false questions, and the actual exam deviated from this, this seems to me like some form of 'breach of contract'. At the ...


2

The real thing the instructor maybe-kinda did wrong was not spending enough time explaining the test format. Teachers hate wasting time on mechanics and Admin -- I'd love to say tests will be "normal" and move on -- but students get nervous. We don't want our A students freezing up, or Q's where 1/2 the class clearly misunderstood. In the long run, it's ...


2

Since you have two specific places in mind, it would be best if you go talk to them. Ask U Cincinnati about their success in transferring students to OSU. But you should also visit OSU and talk to their admissions people about what the real cost to you would be. You seem to be assuming things. Perhaps there are scholarships that would reduce the cost. ...


2

Of course the poor grades will look bad, especially in core courses. As Buffy says, it's always easier, however short-sighted, to admit students who have been consistently successful than students whose records are more variable. But retaking the same (or equivalent) courses and doing well would be strong evidence that you've gotten past whatever was ...


1

As far as I know, from my experience in CS, the committee will decide not on the basis of your institution but on the basis of what you have done. Your grades will matter, obviously. You can still be an exceptional mathematician, in this day and age of the internet, institution matters less. But if you have doubts, the best thing to do is to plan and be ...


1

I predict that you will be fine. The admission to a grad/doctoral program depends much (much) more on what you do than on the ranking of the institution you attend. Rankings can be deceiving and no one sorts candidates by the rankings of, for example, news magazines. If you do well and impress people so that you get good letters of recommendation then you ...


1

I would suggest that you should consider some variables not currently in your list. Is the project well-defined and tractable? If you're clear on what the goal is and have a vague idea of how to go about it, you'll make good progress and have fun. If the project is poorly-defined, has a lot of variables outside of your control, or is far too difficult to ...


1

I am by no means an expert in the realms of academia, prestige, or research papers and am an M.S. student myself, but my logical evaluation of this situation is that you probably have more to gain by doing project 1, for the following reasons: 1) Professor 1 is probably a better connection to have in the long run, especially if the school they went to is ...


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