250

No. It’s not appropriate and this is an obvious, blatant abuse of authority. I have a word in mind to describe this professor, but unfortunately am not free to disclose it as I am under an NDA. (It starts with an “i” and ends with a “t”). Edit: to those asking “why not?”: teaching the class is the professor’s job. He is literally (in the literal sense of “...


231

To me, this is such a non-issue that it doesn't warrant much of a response. So let me add a response :) I didn't mean to imply carelessness, and I am sorry if that's how my email came across. I was a bit overzealous in my email. I will address the errors in the skeleton program in my solution, as you have indicated. Thank you for your detailed response! ...


176

How to deal with this? Dear [student], Thank you for pointing this out. [1 or 2 more sentences of explanation] Sincerely, [your name]. What troubles me is the attitude, which I found it kind of offensive (but I might be wrong). Maybe the email is offensive, or maybe the student just wrote an email from their phone. Maybe they are actively trying to ...


169

Use placeholders You can use a sign or an indication that you would never use in any other circumstances (red cross, three question marks, etc.), a short sentence ("No Answer Given", "I'm sure you knew it!", "You should have tried!"), a sign that occupy the whole space (as suggested by Elizabeth Henning in the first place): slashes, X, Z,... Don't try to ...


166

I would suggest that you repeat that you did not win the fellowship and ask if he has other funding available, "because I am still very interested in the work, but will need to find paid work instead if I can't get a stipend for this collaboration."


160

I scan my student's assignments. There is a big printer with scanning function in our department where you can just put in the papers and it scans all of them at once. Moreover, I do warn them beforehand that I will scan the papers and check if one makes a complaint. This has the advantage that the students will not cheat (in this way) and saves me the time ...


157

You are responsible for teaching the students to the best of your ability, and to judge their capacities to use what they have learned. That judgment is made based on their grades. So you have several things to think about here. Are you teaching the best you can? Teaching does not mean "downloading facts", as I'm sure you're aware. It means "...


150

Keep in mind a very simple rule: Professors are human beings Many of the questions on this site seem to assume from the outset that faculty are strange, mysterious and mercurial creatures, whose motives are entirely opaque and whose every word must be subjected to an intense amount of kremlinology. "Sorry, I do not have time to respond." means that he ...


147

He may or may not be "protecting his ideas", but, in fact, teaching has as a goal the dissemination of ideas. If one wants to keep secrets or have proprietary stuff, don't pretend to teach a friggin' class! :)


145

As a professor, one has to assume that all past exam questions are available to students. Some student organizations debrief members after exams and capture the questions for such an exam bank. Some professors realize this and take action accordingly, not reusing questions, or not using enough of them to matter substantially. Others think, probably ...


141

Do you think it's me being unreasonable? Sadly, yes. I see two problems here: You said in a comment that the policy of "the quiz can happen at any time" was not articulated at all. You gave the quiz near the end of the class a couple of times, and the students naturally assumed that that's when you'll always have it. Now you are trying to argue ...


140

As an outsider this seems ridiculous. I think a quick email to the chair of the department saying that you have an advisee who is worried about BIO302 (or whatever the number is) and the running component. It seems reasonable to ask if that is actually a requirement (which it clearly is, but the department chair may not know it) and if it is, what course ...


135

My advice is to just use the pirated software and not rock the boat, just like Drunken Code Monkey, for example, mentioned. This issue isn't something that you're likely to solve yourself. Instead, you're most likely going to spend large amount of time and energy on nothing and produce no results. The fact that your teacher just expects you to get cracked ...


131

An arrogant sounding email does not mean that the person is arrogant. It is well-known that language and even the assumed personality in online communication differ from the real ones, sometimes very significantly (see e.g. internet troll and internet hero). There may be a bunch of other reasons why a person uses an offensive language without realising it, e....


131

As a student, you are paying for the tuition (teaching). Teaching is an activity designed to help you learn and acquire new skills. Teaching materials (books, slides, video lectures) can be good, bad or ugly, but they are only a (smaller) part of the whole picture. They are not an activity. Arguably, they matter less. What matters more, in my opinion, is ...


128

Generally, yes undergraduates should be paid for their research. This is an equity issue. At many institutions, a large portion of the student body has to work while they study in order to survive. If student research is unpaid, those students will not be able to participate. Students who have to work are often also members of other underrepresented ...


125

Different areas of work look differently. A mechanic, a tailor or a miner perform visible physical operations and deliver an objective and measurable result by hour. Compared with them, office work may seem lazy: people sit at their desks, they are not sweating, can have toilet and drink breaks whenever they want, etc. Also, the result of their work seems ...


121

It's maybe too easy to offer advice on such matters when one doesn't have to live with the consequences, but for what it's worth: for your own peace of mind, and to minimize the risk of long term consequences (while possibly increasing the short term risk, though not by much I hope), I think you should send a contrite email to the editor explaining what ...


120

While it is true that software cracking is inappropriate and even illegal, almost everyone around me uses cracked software That is really bad and I know it happens also in my country (Italy). However, I think there is a false dilemma in your question: So what should I do? Having a talk with my teacher or simply quitting this course? There are not the ...


117

A 5-paragraph email with citations for a possible mistake in an undergraduate exercise sounds, if anything, patronizing. Apologize and move on.


113

There are several things which are not mentioned in the email but which can be assumed when processing such a message: The student is actually trying to help everyone involved. Otherwise they wouldn't have bothered sending the correction. How did the student get to this stage? It seems likely that they first solved the exercise correctly, only to find that ...


105

If the class is about microbiology, the students’ grade should depend on their knowledge of microbiology, and only on that. (Edit: to clarify, “knowledge” covers things like lab skills and other things that have a connection to microbiology but aren’t strictly theoretical in nature. But not running. Definitely not running.) I’ll assume based on OP’s ...


103

I think of Olympiad problems more as "parlour tricks". They're really difficult, and it's super-impressive if someone's good at them, but the skills are very different to the skills you need in research. As a big example of a difference: the Olympiad rewards quick accurate leaps of reasoning, because you're under such time pressure. Research rewards long-...


100

To show that you're an independent learner, I'd suggest don't just send the link, but read the materials in the linked page and summarize them to your professor, tell her if you think it may be useful for the directed studies. For instance, instead of: And here a link (URL) provided by the text on how to teach this book. Try: I also found a link for ...


100

I wanted to ask whether his refusal for recommendation letters is reasonable My personal opinion is that if you worked in his lab for a year (satisfactorily), it is unreasonable to refuse a letter. All the more so if you had other good interactions (TAing, etc.) with him. and also ask for some advice on how to handle this situation! Unfortunately, my ...


99

You are overthinking this. I don't want to make light of academic integrity, but given the cheating that does happen all the time, this is a very minor offense. We all make mistakes, and what you need to do now is learn from your mistake (one of the things you need to learn is to not freak out about making a mistake). The appropriate punishment is what ...


98

Do not fall into the trap of assuming that "Value of work done" is proportional to "Hours spent at a desk". Some HR departments do think this way, but it's rarely true.


95

Take the example of a medical student. Do you want to pass someone who does not have the necessary knowledge to treat patients correctly? It is your duty to make sure that only the ones who know what they are doing will pass. This may be less strict in other subjects but the principle is the same. --- EDIT --- Another example where this becomes clear would ...


95

I think the point is, or should be, that having diagnostic question be "secret" is perverse. That is, why not tell people directly what we want them to know? And why not let them see representative examples of what we want them to do? Sure, some students are not so much interested in learning as in the grade... but should we corrupt the scholarly aspects ...


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