If you need help with online teaching or other challenges in academia arising from the COVID-19 crisis, we have prepared this FAQ to get you started.
100

I suggest requesting a copy of the transcript in whatever language the issuer writes best. For some purposes, such as graduate admission to a foreign university, you may need to pay for a certified translation by a professional translator.


97

You already gave the actual reason: to hide it from employers. Why? Because it is irrelevant. Diplomas/grades from university are the same, for all students. Period. It does not matter how you acquired it, the university recognised you meet the criteria (skills, know-how, ...) for having this diploma. That's all the employer needs to know. Edit from ...


66

College degrees are not a tool for evaluating employment eligibility. Despite the way it has been used in recent times, college diplomas are a certification of higher education in a particular field - they were not designed to be a measure for employers to look at and evaluate for hiring employees, and they still aren't designed that way. There is a ...


47

That's not necessarily the impediment you may think. The institution where I taught would not accept nor transfer credit over ten years old. Pick one or two colleges you might attend, visit their admissions offices, and ask. There's a good chance you can start fresh. There are two things to keep in mind. Your transcript from your old institution will ...


45

H18 stands for Hiver 2018 (Winter 2018), that is, the current semester. Similarly, E18 is Été 2018 (Summer 2018) and A18 is Automne 2018 (Fall 2018). Source: I'm from Québec, and I recognize my former University software in this screen capture.


38

Since nobody seems to have mentioned it yet, it is very likely illegal In the US, at least, several laws (including the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act) prohibit discrimination on the basis of disability. Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act also prohibits unauthorized disclosure of a disability or presumption of ...


37

It sounds like you're in a non-English speaking country, and I assume that the reason you need an English-language transcript is for use in job or college applications to an English-speaking country. In that case, one reasonable option would be to do nothing and simply use the current transcript. My reasoning is that in an English-speaking country, seeing an ...


37

If you were living in the same circumstances, what would you do? If I were you, I would do a part-time Master's degree in Computer Science while working on a not-so-high salary job. You will waste your money and time by doing another Bachelor's degree in Computer Science. You won't gain too much. The courses are about the same except a few theory courses (...


36

If you can't wait for the school, and the professor agrees that this was his error, ask him for a letter saying so (on school letterhead) which you can attach to the transcript. Ditto for the school itself. If employers have some evidence of the error, and have someone they can contact to confirm the correction, this should be manageable.


36

It would mark people as having some type of disability, which the university may not be allowed to disclose. Noting on the transcript that the student used extra time is equivalent to disclosing that the student has some form of disability that allowed them to receive this extra time. It is tedious to keep track of which students are allowed extra time and ...


36

Revealing Disability Accommodations Is Against University Interests Disability accommodations serve the interests of the University in a variety of ways, and anything that penalizes, prevents, or causes students not to seek appropriate accommodations (such as fear of forced or unauthorized disclosure, or an "asterisk" on their grades) is harmful to these ...


36

Most applicants for positions at US universities will have been educated in the US, so US hiring practices are based around the sorts of records that US universities provide. And US universities don't really have such a thing as "degree certificates". The paper diploma from a US university is considered purely ceremonial and not used for any official ...


28

TL;DR: Probably not worth it. Take something else and expand your horizons. From a knowledge perspective, you're not getting anything out of this. You got an A- in the course -- on a transcript, that should tell any graduate school that you understand the material in the course. So any potential gain here would be for your GPA. On a 4.0 scale, an A- is a 3....


27

In your CV consider listing these qualifications more like this: 2013 - Bachelor of Science in Computing Information Systems, from the Department of Computer Science and Engineering Department of King Abdulaziz University, Saudi Arabia. Equivalent in Australia is a Bachelor of Computer Science. 2016 - Master of Science in Information Technology, ...


26

Your situation doesn't sound so bad to me at all. First of all, though perhaps I shouldn't, I will admit that many graduate admissions personnel do not thoroughly scour the transcripts. They look at the GPA and they look at the courses taken. Often this information is given separately on the application, so a look at the actual transcript may only be ...


24

I would err on the side of being honest, as you have a legitimate reason for why one specific class was an issue. Whereas that is explainable, it would be a mark against your character if he discovers that you did not give him a complete list of a classes after he requested it.


21

It is not a crime to fail to provide information that graduate programs ask for. However, surely by "illegal" you mean "against the rules of the university and program you're applying to". In that case my answer is no: not sending information to admissions personnel which is a required part of your application and because you think it would jeopardize your ...


21

If you're in the US, talk to your registrar about what we call a "Privacy Lock." It is pretty much a set of measures to apply should the students wish to remain private. Things as extreme as taking you off the online directory, conceal all your names and e-mails, etc. can be done. Each school may do it slightly differently so you'd need to talk to them and ...


20

I had to submit undergraduate and graduate transcripts to several schools each time I applied for jobs in mathematics. I believe the main reason is simply to allow the school to verify that you really have the credentials you claim. There have been examples where faculty and administrators were caught claiming credentials that they did not possess, so ...


19

Honestly, you need to pick battles that are worth fighting. Inconsistent capitalization of course titles, poor margins and poor line-spacing are not at all significant. Concentrate your energy where it might actually benefit you, such as errors in course names.


19

The problem with GPA as a measure is that it just mixes together a bunch of different classes indiscriminately. Consider these three different students: This student is pretty steady, but not great, and tends to get an even mix of As and Bs across all of their classes, obtaining a 3.5 GPA. This student always takes the class with the easiest grading policy ...


19

I would actually consider doing this a negative. One of the things I noticed when I started my PhD work is that the transition from undergraduate work can be a harsh one. Expectations soar, all of your peers are just as good at this as you are, and most importantly, grades become less important than learning to execute good research. Time and stress ...


18

This can be done in any number of ways depending on the country and the employer: The employer might tell you to get the university to mail them a sealed envelope with the transcript The employer might ask you to grant them guest/view access to your online student records (depending on the Student Information System at your university) The employer might ...


16

Yes, this is near-universal in the United States. Dissertations are not graded, and the GPA includes only course grades. For the most part, people do not care about course grades in Ph.D. programs once you've completed your dissertation. The GPA is understood to refer only to courses, so the GPA is also not considered important. In particular, it is not ...


16

I believe that there cannot be any single numerical statistic or small set of such statistics that summarizes the nature of a student well. The first reason for my assessment is that there are too many different ways one may wish to use information about a student, and too many ways that a student can have an unusual background that will not fit into those ...


14

At the heart, the approach chosen by universities is because a piece of paper, however elaborate, can be forged. It is much more difficult to forge the transmission from one university's degree verification office to another university. So in some sense, the request is simply to make forgeries harder. It's not part of your question, but worth telling ...


13

"All university level courses taken" means "all university level courses taken", so yes, you should submit it too. Otherwise, if at any point they discover that you had been enrolled in that masters, you could be in trouble for lying. Even if they don't require you to submit it, you will have to explain what were you doing during that time. And a bad master'...


13

This may vary by university, but a transcript is a full academic record of your time at an institution. As such, they will expect information on every course that you took, all three years. A partial transcript is obviously acceptable for degrees which have not yet been completed, but omitting completed courses may look like you have something to hide. ...


12

If the requirements say You must submit transcripts from all university level courses taken Then yes, you must submit transcripts from your unrelated master's. To do otherwise would be a violation of the policy, which clearly states you must submit all university-level transcripts.


12

An official transcript is usually sent under some sort of seal, with measures to ensure that the document has not been altered. When delivered to a student, it will usually be in a sealed envelope in such a manner as it will show proof of tampering or opening. The usual method, though, is for the issuing school to send it directly to the intended recipient. ...


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