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113

Some people think it's ok to call yourself PhD ABD when in the Canadian or US system, you pass the qualifying exams and coursework, but haven't yet, or fail to ever, deliver the thesis. But simply do not call yourself PhD ABD. It's not attractive to advertise failure. You're either a PhD candidate, or you're a PhD, or there's nothing to say on the subject ...


93

I completely agree with the answers by ff524 and Pete L. Clark, but I'd like to highlight one issue that's in the background here, regarding whether this behavior is normal. When someone makes a point of emphasizing a professional title, it might be because they are pompous, but they might actually have a good reason for it. It's difficult to do your job ...


69

German academia traditionally expects that one will use all relevant titles, so Prof. Dr. is pretty common there. Likewise other places with an academic system related to Germany in some way. As you note, in the US this would be very uncommon and the two titles you mention often used interchangeably there, even when it isn't clear that both apply. And, if ...


68

Going by "Dr. FirstName" is just confusing. If people aren't familiar with you, they will think it is your last name. If they do know you, it doesn't seem more casual, just odd. It depends on the context and culture, but in the US it is standard to go by either "Dr. LastName" or just "FirstName." Like Solar Mike mentioned, a shortened form like "Dr. Initial"...


63

I'm a male PhD holder from a private university in Malaysia. This answer is based on my personal experiences. It is very common for me and my male colleagues to be addressed as 'Sir', and I have not personally come across any (local) academic staff for whom this has been a problem. Generally, 'Sir' is considered suitably respectful, especially as it's ...


61

I'll answer the general question in the title of your post: What education does one need to be called “Professor” in the United States of America? None at all. In the United States, someone who holds an appointment as a professor (of any rank, including professor-like positions that may not even include "professor" in their official name) at a university ...


59

This will depend on the norm within your country to some extent, but I'm inclined to say that at least in the US, calling a professor 'Mr.' is insulting, provided you are in an academic context. My neighbors, many friends, and the cashier at the cafe know me as Mr. X. But on campus, I'm Dr. X...and you know I'm a professor. Using 'Mr.' seems strangely ...


56

Mx is a gender-neutral honorific. It's probably not a typo. Dr would typically be used if you have a doctoral degree, and Prof if you are employed in a professor-like capacity (it means different things in different countries, but generally any semi-permanent faculty job is reasonably included). Otherwise, you can decide which of Ms and Mx fits you better....


55

Yes, you can call any kind of professor a professor, and you should. Addressing someone as "assistant professor" or "associate professor" would be...well, it's simply not done, so I can't say if it would be rude or just weird. It is similar to military protocol, actually: e.g. if someone is a rear or vice admiral, you call them admiral. In contrast to the ...


54

Nowadays, every sufficiently recent typesetting system is able to deal with diacritics. When submitting to journals, the real problem are the publishers' typesetters, who are -- at least in my experience -- frequently careless in copying letters with diacritics. So, my advice is: keep the diacritics, as the style guides and common sense suggest, but check ...


53

I would say this depends on context. When contacting academics, it is common to assume they all have a doctorate. A mass email (or mail-merged etc.) is therefore likely to use Dr. even for a PhD student on the list, because checking would take much more work. Thus in a context where someone has no particular reason to know you personally, it's probably best ...


52

For most people, insult and offense comes more from lack of care and respect than from mistakes. I would thus recommend the following procedure: Prepare a draft, making your best guess for each speaker based on their web presence. Send out the draft agenda to all speakers, saying that this is the draft and you'd like corrections in case you have made ...


50

In general, if you are not enrolled in any course and also are not enrolled in a program in which you may eventually earn a degree, you are not a "student."


50

You can't immediately tell from the title, but then titles are not typically used by an individual to broadcast their occupation - we don't have variants of "Mr" for plumbers, bank managers, or rock stars - despite their very different occupations. Rather, the title is to be used by others when addressing that individual, in order to signify a degree of ...


47

A certain amount of separation from your students has value. You have some power over their future, for example. The use of usted implies respect as well. This is useful if any conflicts arise in the future where you need to take a role of authority. But, having a friendly and open relationship with your students is also useful if it gives them the "...


45

Writing as an Administrator: It is appropriate to use the title when you are a graduate, ie, when the degree is conferred either in notice by letter or by ceremony (which ever comes first). Prior to that your status is that of a graduand. If you've been using the work-title PhD Candidate you might consider changing to PhD Graduand to indicate this status:...


44

Running title: "the title or abbreviated title of a volume printed at the top of left-hand text pages or sometimes of all text pages" It allows readers to determine which paper they're looking at just by glancing at the top of the page. If your actual title is already very short, use your actual title. If your actual title is not very short, use an ...


44

Generically, a PhD is a Doctor of Philosophy, not a doctor in philosophy. Thus a PhD in philosophy would a Doctor of Philosophy in Philosophy (as opposed to a PhD in economics, who would be a Doctor of Philosophy in Economics).


43

I agree with you. People expect websites, email signatures, etc, to have accurate job titles, and there is a major qualitative difference between "Visiting Assistant Professor" and "Assistant Professor". Dropping the "Visiting" unintentionally is careless, and intentionally dropping it to "upsell" (i.e. mislead) is unethical. (You might as well say, as ...


41

"Dr Name, PhD" is redundant, so this usage is often discouraged. If you are going to indicate the degree, I'd recommend "Name, PhD" rather than "Dr Name" since it's more informative (at the very least it will keep anyone from thinking you are a medical doctor). In the U.S. it's not common to indicate the university, but I think I've seen it more often in ...


41

Yes you can. The "Assistant Professor" still teaches. The word Assistant is there to denote the rank within the academic system. Some have taught longer and are more accomplished and are rewarded accordingly. Actually, calling the person "Assistant Professor Jones" would be very awkward and cumbersome. It should be avoided.


40

One of my friends chose to have students call him "Dr. R" (R was the initial of his first name) - he had a huge amount of respect from the students and his colleagues : personally, it's not the name that garners respect, but the attitude, character and spirit of the person. Do what feels right for you - respect is earned and not necessarily based on a title ...


39

In some countries (e.g. The Netherlands where I obtained my PhD degree) you are not considered a student but a paid employee (staff) with the university. To discern between these, people sometimes translate their status to English using term "PhD candidate". Btw, this has nothing to do with the length of the program or your progress.


39

I think you should just introduce yourself as I work as a professor at the University of X. omitting the assistant rank that can cause misunderstandings. The following conversation line feels also very safe: – Where do you work? – I do research and teach at the University of X. which might be a better fit since it explains your job in a short ...


38

If you're talking about the use of doctor as a title, as in "Dr. Smith", I doubt there's any compelling explanation. Most degrees don't come with titles: nobody say Master Smith or Bachelor Smith or Associate Smith. Historically, magister (corresponding to the master's degree) was just as appropriate a Latin title as doctor was, but it simply isn't used in ...


37

As Johanna has noted, "Sir" and "Miss" are not actually equivalent titles. There's also a risk in that many female academics have grown weary of having their academic titles dropped while this happens more rarely to their male colleagues, so it's also possible the level of offense differs by gender. Personally, I'd ask them what they prefer to be called, ...


36

I think your assertion really is an overgeneralization, but there are some negative points to pursuing more than one PhD. It's the same concern as it would be for pouring an inordinate amount of resources into the wrong pursuit. It might indicate something about the recipients decision-making abilities, or "perpetual student syndrome". That said, if that'...


35

In the U.S., "professor emeritus" simply means "retired professor". It's a courtesy title offered to retiring professors to acknowledge their continued scholarly role even after formal retirement. It typically includes library privileges and a computer account, and emeritus professors may also have offices (this depends on departmental policy and the ...


34

No. He was an LL D of Trinity College, granted 1765; and a DCL of Oxford, granted 1775. See https://www.britannica.com/biography/Samuel-Johnson Note: DCL= Doctor of Civil Law. LL.D.= Doctor of Laws, that is of both the Civil and the Canon Law.


33

Ir. means a masters degree in Engineering. source : Belgian Education :) I added a "reference". This Prof. Dr. Ir. received a M.Sc. degree in electrical engineering and the Ph.D. degree in mechanical engineering from the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (K.U.Leuven), Belgium Also, from wikipedia: Belgium In Belgium, there are two types of engineering ...


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