93

For example, Merriam–Webster defines plagiarism via to plagiarize, which it defines as: : to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one's own : use (another's production) without crediting the source intransitive verb : to commit literary theft : present as new and original an idea or product derived from an existing source This ...


89

Vita means life. Vitae is the genitive (possessive) form, of life. Curriculum means something like course. So Curriculum vitae means the course of one's life, and makes good sense. Vita by itself also makes good sense, though it's perhaps less accurate as a description of the document in question. Neither curriculum vita nor vitae without curriculum makes ...


59

TV-L is the German public servant remuneration grade table (Tarifvertrag für den Öffentlichen Dienst der Länder (TV-L)). It is how civil servants Germany are graded for their salaries and similar conditions for their work. Depending on where your position is, you'll be under TV-L West, or East, or Berlin, or Hessen. Something in your letter might specify ...


55

I have on occasion felt the same myself (sometimes still do), and know of many disillusioned PhD students who felt exactly like that. There are dark moments in the night, when you are wondering whether funding for CS will be cut down entirely eventually, when funding agencies also get to the conclusion that CS is one big science of imposters. However, what ...


55

I am pretty sure this is just a ridiculously dated instruction. On some older printers, the pages were ejected print side up and new pages were added to the top. This means that the first page printed would end up being the bottom page of the document when you picked it up. If you then wanted to staple the document in the correct order, you needed to reorder ...


50

In addition to the terms suggested by Scientist, another relatively common term is citation ring, here ring being used with the meaning (from Merriam-Webster): 7 a : an exclusive combination of persons for a selfish and often corrupt purpose (as to control a market) b : GANG Here are a few examples of usage of citation ring: SAGE Publications busts “...


41

The reason why it is difficult to tell what workshops are about is because it is a catch-all category that many different types of academic meeting are labelled as. To illustrate, let me give examples of the nature of some of the events that I have attended in the last two years that all use the same word "workshop" to describe themselves: A "baby ...


41

From the Wikipedia article entitled "Camera-ready": The term camera-ready was first used in the photo offset printing process, where the final layout of a document was attached to a "mechanical" or "paste up". Then, a stat camera was used to photograph the mechanical, and the final offset printing plates were created from the camera's negative. ...


41

In my university, people often call limitations as 'constraints'. I have heard them saying: "resource constraints" - availability of computers and machines, people "financial constraints" - Money "space constraints" - Physical space (room), lab etc.


40

In some countries (e.g. The Netherlands where I obtained my PhD degree) you are not considered a student but a paid employee (staff) with the university. To discern between these, people sometimes translate their status to English using term "PhD candidate". Btw, this has nothing to do with the length of the program or your progress.


40

I kind of like Teddi Fishman's (Chair of ICAI) definition of plagiarism from her paper “We know it when we see it” is not good enough: toward a standard definition of plagiarism that transcends theft, fraud, and copyright: Plagiarism occurs when someone uses words, ideas, or work products attributable to another identifiable person or source without ...


40

A common system works roughly as Najib Idrissi describes: courses numbered 100-199 are first-year courses, which either have no prerequisites or only high school-level prerequisites. Courses numbered 200-299 are second-year courses, which have 100-level prerequisites, and so on. But this system is by no means universal in the US, nor does the rough ...


39

Many universities (both public and private) in the US have campus police. These are actual police officers who can carry guns and have the power to arrest someone or write a citation. On a large campus with tens of thousands of students, this can be a quite sizable police force. The campus police typically have jurisdiction limited to the university ...


38

Yes, in your reference, the third definition is the one being used, rather than the first: a member of a group of people who have shared interests, activities, etc. Of course, we should look to how the word is actually used rather than solely to its dictionary definition, but in this case I think that actually makes the argument even stronger, since ...


36

Transactions used to have a very specific meaning. From the New Oxford American Dictionary: transactions published reports of proceedings at the meetings of a learned society In this historical usage, it is synonymous to proceedings, i.e. it is a published report of a conference or a set of meetings. Many learned societies have transactions: ...


35

This is just a peculiarity of British English that read can have this particular meaning. The New Oxford American Dictionary says: read 3. chiefly Brit. study (an academic subject) at a university: I'm reading English at Cambridge [ no obj. ]: he went to Manchester to read for a BA in Economics. So, it's more about language itself than the official ...


35

This is a good question, but there is no consensus as to a good answer. Some people think mathematics is obviously a science, some people think it obviously isn't, and some just aren't sure. It's common to include mathematics as a special case of science in general discussions. For example, universities usually classify mathematics under the sciences, ...


33

The abbreviation "P.I." stands for "Principal Investigator" and is routinely used in the United States to denote a "head of the laboratory" or "research group leader" (wikipedia), and serves to refer to active researchers with potential funding for PhD students or post-doctoral researchers. It is used by various ...


32

While Bill Barth's description of "professional student" as someone whose sheltering in academia and trying not to graduate is one I have heard, there's also a more formal designation for the term. Mainly, post-graduate students who are in professional degree programs. For example, medical and dental students, law students, many students pursuing Masters of ...


32

Part of the confusion may be that these adjectives are used in (at least) two different contexts: to describe degrees and to describe students. An undergraduate degree generally means a bachelor's degree (B.S., B.A., etc): a degree requiring about four years of university-level study beyond high school. A graduate degree or post-graduate degree is any ...


31

paper = article: In the academic meaning of the words, papers and articles refer to the same thing: a published piece of writing. The term is used for journal papers or journal articles, which means they have been published by a journal, but also for less traditional publications, including self-publication (“Dr. Who just published a great paper on the ...


31

It's actually a little bit more complicated than "soft money" vs. "hard money," but the basic idea is that any scientific position can be categorized on the basis of where the money to support it comes from. In general, "soft money" refers to positions where the funding source is based on external grants and contracts. As long as there is a sufficient ...


30

I asked my wife, who is a professional conference manager and organizes IEEE conferences (the last one she did was the S3SConference) and her response was: "The first page of the submitted PDF must be the first page of the paper" and the clarification was "some papers get submitted with several cover sheets embedded in the PDF before you get to the actual ...


30

Yes, "research fellow" is a gender neutral term, just as Simone de Beauvoir can be called a "fellow traveler". The word "fellow" derives from the Old English feolaga which means roughly "one who shares something" and is etymologically not gendered; you are being misled by the more recent colloquial usage (less than 600 years old) to mean male person. But ...


29

Traditionally naming after scientists has been considered an honour bestowed upon somebody by their colleagues. This is why there are plenty of such names in latin animal or plant names. one very good example is Strigiphilus garylarsoni, a chewing louse, named after Gary Larson, author of the Far Side. Naming can also be subject to strict laws. In some ...


29

"Vita" is an American English term, synonymous with "Curriculum vitae". If your web site targets only Americans, then "Vita" is fine as a label. If you wish to appeal to an international audience, you'd be better to call it a "CV". The phrase "Curriculum vita" is an error, and makes no sense. That's what the speaker at the workshop was telling you. ...


28

In general, the name of a thing should indicate an aspect of it which is very important to the person assigning the name. A person who creates something and names it after themselves implies that they think the most important thing about it is that they created it. That would in turn suggest to anyone who isn't interested in the person who created it would ...


27

I believe this is unethical practice but not "officially" misconduct. There is some ongoing research on this, elsewhere. Some sources call this "citation stacking", while others call it "citation cartels". Mind that these terms were coined for journals while they certainly can be applied to authors. Such citation schemes are an adaptation of other more ...


26

Generally, XYZ refers to the editor that handled the paper at the journal.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible