55

I have never seen a photo on CV to be a requirement (although the fact that is included in parenthesis might implicitly mean that is optional?) My interaction with colleagues in Europe (especially Germany) seems to suggest that this is a relatively common requirement, or at least a default expectation for what is a "complete" CV that they may feel the need ...


29

This is not uncommon when you have a large pool of applicants, because makes it easier to identify you vs other candidates. It is likely that this approach has been adopted for all recruitment at this institution, in a one size fits all strategy rather than specifically for this post. Some people remember faces better than names, so having both available ...


26

In many countries (UK, US) it's very unusual and possibly illegal to request a photo on a CV and it's very rare that people put one spontaneously. In Switzerland however, it's still pretty much standard. While there is growing criticism about the obvious bias issues associated with that practice, I'm not surprised to still see that requirement in ...


21

I think in the end it will be a personal choice based on what you want in your career on where you may do your PhD. Based on some of the queries you had in the comparison between a US PhD or a European one, hopefully the following will be of help. This link is a good page that shows the difference between the system in Europe and the US for PhD. The main ...


19

I can speak for Austria (place where I did my PhD) and Switzerland (current place of employment), but my answer should be applicable for Germany as well. I wonder what is the Phd application process for Germany and Switzerland. Are there scholarships offered? Is there a need for scholarship at all, or do you get paid as an researched directly from the ...


18

Several countries in Europe do this, although it is becoming less common due to the obvious problems with bias, so you should not treat it as an extraordinary request. What will happen if you do not do it is hard to predict, but may range from nothing to your CV simply being binned. My advice is to proceed as if failing to provide it will result in your ...


14

This seems to be historical. ETH is a university. Switzerland also has institutes formerly called Höhere Technische Lehranstalten (HTL), which are now called Fachhochschule. The preconditions to enter the ETH and a Fachhochschule differ significantly. Finishing a degree at ETH used to take significantly longer, and the curriculum at ETH involved far more ...


11

It's just a matter of cultural standard. While including a photo may occur "mildly strange" to you (probably from a US background?) it is, for instance, in Germany as normal as stating your given name: You would just not hand in a CV without this information, even if (technically) it should not matter for the job. The following is a quote from the "CV ...


10

A good place to look for open positions in academia in CH is the ETH-gethired website. In Switzerland, you will usually be hired by the university or research institute and receive a salary (about 3.6 to 4.5k CHF/month). In exchange you typically have to do TA work (assisting with practical sessions in courses, correcting assignments, etc.) and sometimes ...


10

EPFL is one of the better technical universities. This has two consequences: 1) it will be hard (as @xLeitix notes, if your current school doesn't even teach complexity, you will be in for a challenging time at EPFL), and 2) you won't have a problem to get a job afterwards. Note that differences between schools are not as pronounced in Europe as elsewhere. ...


10

In Switzerland, access to medicine, dentistry and veterinary is limited due to high demand (also for Swiss students). The test for admission is called Numerus clauses and it was introduced because the capacity of the universities are too low and demand too high. Basically they are allowed to test students if demand is more than 20% above capacity. ...


10

As astronat says, the prestige of the university matters very little when you do a PhD. However, the prestige of the fellowship that funds you matters even less. Divorce yourself from the notion that these are the important metrics to evaluate, and instead look at: Which advisor will you work with, and what are their students doing now? If you have a chance ...


9

To add to gman's answer: it's true that in the US, most students enter a PhD program immediately after the bachelor's, but by no means all. It's not uncommon for a student to have done a master's elsewhere first. As such, any reasonable PhD program should be used to dealing with incoming students who already have a master's, and be willing to adjust their ...


7

In general, doctoral studies in both Germany and Switzerland are paid research employees. In Germany, for instance, Doktoranden (doctoral students) are formally called Wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiter ["scientific (or academic) workers"]. They are paid as government employees according to a fixed scale, and have a contract outlining their duties. Now, for ...


7

I can only speak for Germany: Teaching is done by professors. Sometimes they delegate certain courses to assistants (not TAs, usually PhD candidates or post-docs), but this is still counted as "teaching" by the professor (there are legal issues involved which I don't want to adress here, but this is the common practice). As a consequence, the assistant ...


6

Some quotes from Wikipedia: ETH is a federal institute (i.e., under direct administration by the Swiss government), whereas the University of Zürich is a cantonal institution. […] In the beginning, both universities were co-located in the buildings of the University of Zürich. […] Events of the neighboring University of Zürich are well-attended ...


6

The difference is that in the US, Bachelor's degrees take longer to obtain (4 years vs. 3 in Switzerland) and it's considered the actual 'college degree', while as you know, in CH1 it makes little sense to stop at the Bachelor's level because is has no value except to give you entry to the Master's (with perhaps the exception of ETH/EPF Bachelors in ...


6

Honestly there are really cool universities in Europe where you can learn much about Computer Science and related subjects. If you look at the rankings of universities in the world you will see that ETHZ and EPFL are ranked among top 50 unis for CS subjects. Last time I checked ETHZ was somewhere around 7 and EPFL somewhere close to 20. However keep in mind ...


5

From the perspective of the Netherlands and the social sciences I can say that international mobility is certainly common, but staying in your own country is even more common. I would say a small majority does indeed limit it's search to the Netherlands. This has consequences for the job market. Since the Netherlands is a small country the (sub-(sub-))...


5

As a general comment: I feel there is a lot of fluff in this question which (as you seem to figure out yourself) makes the question seem more specific to you personally than what it actually is. So after reading through rather unnecessary backstory (no offense :) ) I think this was your actual question? I found that EPFL has a good education and I would ...


5

When did you graduate? A new law came into effect in 2010 which requires that all new postdoc hires of individuals who held a PhD for more than 2 years at the start of the contract be only given L permits. (I only found out after I had a similar discussion with human resources a few weeks ago.) If you have had your degree for less than 2 years, it is ...


5

Let me first point some differences that may help you making your mind, between the PhD programs in USA and Canada on one hand, and in Europe on the other. In US & Canada you go through a structured PhD program, so it'll be pretty much like your current masters in Switzerland. You'll need to take some classes, then you'll have a semester or two to work ...


5

In my (German) department you are typically either part time employed on a certain project, and in your free time you are expected to write your dissertation. In that you typically don't teach. It is efficient if you write your dissertation on a similar topic as the project. Alternatively some professors have positions available for "generic" PhD students (...


5

Here in Austria in the STEM fields you are usually employed with a full time salary of ~2600€ (40 h/week, 14 times a year, ~25 000 after tax) but depending on your department or position you might only be employed for 20-40h. Very common are 25 or 30 h per week which comes down to > 18 000€ a year after tax, usually enough to cover cost of living. There's ...


4

In an ideal world, you would have already an interest in a particular research topic that you'd like to learn more about. I think that's the first crucial step before you do anything else. Assuming that you have selected your research area, you can look for researchers/professors that are defining the frontiers in that area and live in DE or CH. Once you ...


4

UK is definitely of the 'professor has funding' variety of post-docs. However, there are also Fellowships. This is funding intended for a researcher doing their own research and there are programs specifically for Early Career Researchers. For example, there are Fellowships available through the EU Horizon 2020 program, see http://ec.europa.eu/programmes/...


4

While @Peters answer is correct on the historical aspect and the difference to the "Fachhochschule(n)", there is something missing: The ETH Zurich and the EPF (Lausanne) are Federal Institutes of Technology. And while they technically are universities (as by the usage of the term outside Switzerland), the difference here is that ETHZ and EPFL are directy ...


4

For postdocs @ ETH: If this is not said specifically in the job text, you can safely assume that no knowledge of German will be required, although it may or may not count as a plus depending on the PI. There will almost certainly be no statement in your contract that you will need to learn German within a time frame, as postdocs are not "career" positions ...


4

I live in Switzerland and in the last 6 Years I have send dozens of CVs, every single one with a picture. Some may not require it but it definitely is standard and if you don't send one it may look odd. As for why, I don't really know. Its probably just the way it always been.


3

Consider not sending a photo, but be prepared to send one on request. Here in the UK, it has been proven by sending identical CVs with different names (and I'll find you the links if you want) that female applicants are invited for interview less frequently than male applicants, and that ethnic-origin applicants are invited for interview less frequently ...


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