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2

tl;dr: Try your local small claims court or arbitration service to claim your salary, and make a formal complaint to your university regarding the professor's threat. Disclaimer: I'm not a lawyer, I'm an academic too. Try to look up guidelines specific to your jurisdiction. Don't worry about what may be common in academia. Pay disputes are very common in ...


9

You should report this to a some authority. The chances are good (but we do not know this) that the person has done this before and will do it again. Ethically if you have evidence enough to make a formal complaint you should to prevent them exploiting people. Ethically and practically are, however, two different things - you will have to make the decision ...


19

No, this is not normal. If an agreement about number of working hours and an hourly salary is made, the salary is normally supposed to be paid according to that agreement. It is not clear to me if a contract was written up, or if everything was oral agreements. If there is no contract, and no written correspondence to confirm the agreement, you will ...


63

Is this normal? No. In most places, wage theft is a serious crime. Who should I speak to about this? The HR department. Possibly also the department chair. Provide a detailed written statement of what happened and when.


1

You already gave a good summary with the three questions at the very end. If you are very interested in the topic, already know a lot about it and can work on your own without much help, then go for it. If I were you, I would sit down and try to figure out a topic for your thesis. If you have the impression that you have a reasonable idea then ask the ...


0

It very much depends on two factors: your relationship with your advisors how influential they are in the area of your interest And then it depends on other factors like: How comfortable are they with recommending people aggressively How does your actual skill-set and experience look like Have you worked with the prospective company / department of your ...


2

My advisors wrote generic recommendation letters and uploaded them to Interfolio, and that was pretty much it. That said, my relationship with them was very transactional and so I never felt comfortable asking for anything other than recommendation letters. Personally, I think advisors should help with the job hunt, and should take the initiative to offer ...


4

Some universities specifically tell supervisors that helping students find a job is not part of the supervisor's responsibility. Most supervisors will give advice. Some may provide more help than that. Is it true that graduates often get positions just by having their advisor make a "phone call"? This would be extremely rare. Some might ...


12

I think it's reasonable to expect a PhD advisor to make introductions but not to place you into jobs. They should help introduce you to people at conferences, both directly 1 to 1 or by supporting you in getting opportunities to present. They should introduce you to visiting professors when they come to tour your space/give a talk to your department. They ...


0

I think it would be better to wait till the end of Wednesday, and then send a follow up email. It could be that he forgot to call or may be quite busy, given the (small) delay in his previous response. For the same reason, calling directly may not be a good idea. In addition, do check that you did not miss any call or were unreachable at some point during ...


0

It is difficult to be certain, as it is partly a matter of individual personality. I think, however, that it would be good to mention in each letter that you are also making inquiries generally in the department so that no one is surprised. And if they are slightly tailored, say mentioning a paper of theirs that you are familiar with it is a bit better. ...


5

It is okay in the sense that it doesn't violate any ethical rules. However, I think it is unlikely that you will find success on this path. Professors receive an unhealthy number of emails every day, and this increases with an unhealthy number of PhD application emails in PhD application season. If you want an email to a professor to be successful, it may ...


1

Unfortunately, I think the correct way to do this would have been to have a conversation with both PIs (both individually and then together) about your preference in switching. If there was agreement, you could settle together on a way to transition. You could still try this approach but I think it's a bit late. There are many many other questions here ...


0

It's probably going to be a bit difficult to get a professor to agree to take you on as a "volunteer," because they see it (in my personal experience) as a time-sink from what they're really trying to accomplish, which is train students, teach, get grants, and publish. This is especially the case for a potential "part-time" student, since research generally ...


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