New answers tagged

-1

I find that when multiple supervisors provide apparently contradictory feedback, there is some deeper issue with the paragraph or work in question. The best approach is often not to adapt the manuscript according to the feedback but to transcend the contradiction by rewriting the paragraph such that the problem evaporates. Additionally, you could use a ...


1

The desirability of such a situation varies from person to person. Some people, but I doubt many, would love the independence. But others (most?) need more guidance, especially at the start and possibly near the end. But if you need more guidance then you need to find a way to get it. A co-advisor? A different advisor? Something. But just going along as ...


4

I did a quick search on this and I could find a document that suggests this: At any given point of time, the maximum number of Ph.D. students allowed should not exceed 8 students for a recognized Professor, 6 students for a recognized Associated Professor and 4 students for a recognized Assistant Professor. Read point number 4 on page 2 of the ...


3

This is a common problem which is very hard to solve. I suggest telling your supervisor that they need to set a timeline for completion of the project. If the supervisor sets the deadlines for themselves, they might be more likely to stick to the deadlines. If you do this, be sure you meet the deadlines set for you.


1

Unfortunately, your description sounds familiar and is not umcommon. PhD advisors often have more tasks they can manage in their limited time, so they have to set priorities which means that some things are done and others more or less forgotten (new things keep pouring in...). So if you desperately want or need the feedback you have to make sure to rise in ...


-1

Your supervisor has acted with hipocrisy, has no interpersonal skills and should resign himself right away to supervise you. This might be just a supervisor's strategy to avoid problems in their publication goals and an attempt of gaslighting you and the department managers. Take your work with you (if any), estimate whether you should ask for a supervisor ...


-2

Write to your supervisor asking for clarifications on the writing process and how is the supervisor input supposed to be. Suggest to your supervisor that the authorship is under risk if you are the only contributor, that you are not going to waste your time with the paper (which can have an effect in the future) or that you might get interested in your own ...


0

I think the only conclusion that you can draw from the situation is that the PI perceived something that made her feel like she didn't want to commit to a multi-year relationship with you. I don't think it does you much good to wonder if she really has the resources for more than one student or not. There are some hints in some of the comments you've made ...


2

My supervisor seemed understanding, telling me I was 'one of the strongest students' he'd taught, and not to worry as sometimes life gets in the way, and I should take a study break if necessary. Taking a break seems a great idea, I think your supervisor said good things here. I therefore took a year off, and came off the medication. It is great to know ...


4

If you are in good terms with your PI and you have weekly meetings with her, it is probably best if you bring up the topic in your next meeting. If "lab politics" are really involved (which need not be the case), it is unlikely that she will provide more information through email. If she had told you that she would have funding and space for you all, it is ...


3

Assuming what you said is entirely true. Some key points to think about are: 1) Did you suffer from depression prior to being admitted to the PhD program? If yes, you should consider this as your mis-judgement of the suitability of the PhD program to you at the beginning. Learn from it. 2) Were you paid by stipend during the break? If yes, I would say your ...


-2

Thanks for the very interesting question. Here is my two cents. 1) I fully agree with Erwan that " your supervisor owes you at least a clear explanation, if only for you to make an informed decision about what to do next." 2) Getting a PhD is supposed to be tough and rightly so. Advising PhD students is hard work. One of a supervisor's tasks is to help you,...


-2

Most depressions during a PhD stem from an unreasonable supervisor that puts people in uncomfortable if not threatening situations of pressure. There is almost no checks and balances in academia and a PhD ultimately depends solely on the opinion of your supervisor. Considering the reply of your supervisor, you should rethink twice if you want to work with ...


8

In my opinion your confusion is understandable, your supervisor owes you at least a clear explanation, if only for you to make an informed decision about what to do next. If for some reason your supervisor doesn't give you this explanation, I'd suggest you try to discuss this with somebody else who can give you a reasonably objective evaluation: maybe there ...


2

There are really two questions here: (1) Is the request ethical/fair? (2) Should you agree to the request? Unfortunately, these two can be quite independent, and we can only honestly answer the first. It is neither ethical nor fair, going by the information you've provided. Its safe to say that this would be a form of exploitation, even if it doesn't add to ...


17

It is hard to know how to advise you in particular because there are many aspects of the situation that are not covered in your posting. However, here are some ideas that may be helpful. You should not do this by email. Email is not a good medium for important discussions such as this. You should request an in-person meeting with your advisor. Before you go ...


9

This is a big area to cover in "an answer" which will be more like 5 questions to begin of a conversation :) but you've done the right thing in asking for opinions. Firstly I'd say I disagree with most of the answers. If your advisor is suggesting that you quit, it is likely that you will have a hard time carrying on with the same advisor. Maybe, but ...


67

I would like to add my perspective as a supervisor having a PhD student suffering from a depression. She has been absent for about two years now and not yet returned. Neither me nor she herself have anticipated that it would take so long. The year might have been a surprise for your supervisor, too. I have been supportive over all this time and will keep ...


75

If your advisor is suggesting that you quit, it is likely that you will have a hard time carrying on with the same advisor. You maybe need to have a discussion with them about why your performance was bad, and why you needed a break. As it currently stands, it sounds like you had one year in the program without any progress, and then another year where you ...


5

You should really reflect on it, and probably talk to your physician or other professional about it. If the PhD, although it is your dream, was causing your suffering you might be better off not returning to it. Now, if you actually want to keep going, you might try to convince your advisor, if that does not work, it does not mean that you have to quit the ...


6

This is hard to give good advice about without a lot of context. What is ethical and what is done (in some fields) don't necessarily match up well. In some fields, an advisor is often a co-author - even first author. If the other person has made no contribution to the paper then, ethically, the request is wrong. But you may need to accede to it just out of ...


5

I also feel terrible every day about what I said to the Head of Department. They were the best teacher I’d ever had and they are also one of the foremost scholars in my current field. I think what you said to the Head of Department should have been expected and I think you should have been better supported. ‪My question is whether I should try to reach ...


2

A non-Sweden-specific answer: A post-doctoral researcher is not a student. (That is, except in the sense that all researchers are "students" of the subjects they study.) Thus, what you're asking is: Can a post-doctoral researcher working under the supervision of another, senior researcher switch "bosses"? I believe this clarifies things somewhat, and ...


17

(I'm faculty at Chalmers University of Technology, a well-known private university in Gothenburg, Sweden) The pragmatic question (whether it's a good idea to change supervisors mid-flight) is covered well by posdef, I'll focus on the legal angle here. As you mention, PhD students have quite some rights in Sweden, but this is mostly because they are in a ...


5

Just to add a few things to posdef's great answer. I think it's worth mentioning that a PhD and a postdoc position are very different in terms of work dynamics with the "supervisor", and trying to compare the two is a bit questionable: The primary purpose of a PhD student position is to provide the student with specialized research training under the ...


1

The other answers give proper solutions to the questions the OP asks. Here is a suggestion to avoid the problem altogether. Publish the full paper on arXiv, or as a technical report from your own university. Then publish an abbreviated version in the journal, and make crossreferences. Before you do this, carefully doublecheck the journal's policies on ...


8

TLDR: It will depend very heavily on the funding situation. A reasonable guess as to why there is a clear remark about the PhD students and not about the postdocs is that how postdocs are employed varies significantly. Without having any proof, I would guess that you can't change your mentor however you like if s/he is paying you. Because why would you ...


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