69

From an information processing perspective, it is much more beneficial to have four classes over ten weeks than two classes over five weeks. This is because the mind needs the extended time to digest the material that it is being exposed to. The two class approach is highly beneficial in allowing students to focus. However, the reduction in exposure to the ...


50

There are in fact two colleges (Cornell College in Iowa, not to be confused with Cornell University, and Colorado College in Colorado) that have students take one class at a time, with 9 3.5-week terms over the course of an academic year. One reason more colleges don't do this is that most students seem to be not like you and tend not to like summer classes....


25

A summer school is usually a way to have a focused series of lectures on a specific topic. The best analogy I can think of is that of a master class for musicians. The audience are students who are usually sufficiently adept that they can handle the intensity and focus of a short program taught at a high level. For example, if you're just starting out in ...


22

Your suggestion looks fine. I would consider making an offer to bring them up to speed on anything you have been working on that could help them out.


16

I assume you're talking about summer schools aimed at teaching graduate students or postdocs about recent developments. At an early career stage, it's certainly worth listing participation on your CV. If you're a beginning graduate student, then you probably don't have a lot of other things to list, and attending a summer school means something (namely ...


15

Short answer: you can't teach some things if you have short terms. Some colleges do that. The University of Chicago and Dartmouth, for example, are on the quarter system where classes are 10 weeks long, and students usually take 3-4 classes per quarter. Colorado College has a 3 week system where you only take a single class per week. The main reason why ...


14

There are similar summer schools in mathematics, though there are some differences from what you describe. I've helped organize a summer school so I'll try to answer some of these questions. The math summer schools I know about are somewhat longer, usually 2-4 weeks. They don't provide formal academic credit and there are no exams. They are aimed at PhD ...


10

Taking from when I was a student, there are a few reasons. Connecting material covered in different courses is important Each student found some courses harder than others, by taking 5 courses at the same time, it is possible to spend longer on what you find hard. Some days I just did not feel like learning some subjects, so having flexibility on time ...


10

I think that your suggestion, like what Scott thought, looks perfectly fine, but you should make a few edits. This is what I think you should send. Hello guys, I hope you are having a good weekend, I’m writing to you to let you know that unfortunately, for personal reasons, I have to drop out of this class. I have sent an email to the professor, so he will ...


7

To answer both questions of "what to write" and "why they ask for this," I will quote an answer from @badroit to a related question (which deals with writing a research statement): You're trying to demonstrate why you and your background are a good fit for a summer school and that you will benefit greatly from that school. The general idea is the same ...


6

I'm a PhD student in my final months, I'm in a different field (geophysics), but I've been to some summer-schools that I found very valuable. One lecturer even stated that summer schools are the best forum for scientific exchange. The summer schools I've been to didn't have as many participants as yours, but still, besides from the obvious point of ...


6

So my question is, what is the difference between statement of research interest for graduate schools admission and that for summer school? The way you phrase the question suggests that you see this statement of research interest as a form to fill in some details. But it's not like there's a "P27.B: Statement Of Research Interest for Summer Schools" form ...


6

The cost of summer courses in the United States is likely to be as staggeringly variable as the the cost of courses during the semester. To the best of my knowledge, most universities generally do not change their tuition fees significantly during the summer. As such, it will range across at least two orders of magnitude depending on the school you are ...


6

The following are more diverse comments than answers, but they don't fit in the comment box. In the northern hemisphere temporary employment is generally more available in the summer tourist season (in the low population areas near winter sports areas this is wrong, but in general tersm it is not). Many students, particularly in an expensive system like ...


6

I guess I'd think about it a little differently than you did. It doesn't sound to me like your experience was so bad! I think it might be helpful just to reframe your goals. It's usually true that you won't get everything from the talks. Otherwise your classes would consist of lecture and no tests or reading! Instead of aiming to follow 100%, I focus on: ...


5

In my experience, there are typically three methods for dealing with funding for a short- to medium-term visit: Directly collect travel and living expense information (e.g., via receipts) and advance/recompense money to those documented expenses. This can be quite painful to actually implement for anything more than about a week. Take on the person as a ...


5

How about writing something like: "My masters thesis advisor, Prof. X, has encouraged me to apply for this summer school". No doubt you can adapt this to suit your particular circumstances.


5

A research area is what a research topic is placed into, but is much broader than the scope of the topic. For example a research area can be human physiology, computer science (as you mentioned) or even relate to a specific field within these broader terms such as cardiac electrophysiology or machine learning respectively. A research topic would be a ...


4

While I think there are a variety of great, more pedagogically-relevant reasons given in other answers, I also see a serious logistical reason. My own alma mater would, I think, be farcically inept at attempting to implement this, and I do not think it would be alone. The problem I’m referring to is that developing schedules is exceptionally difficult. At ...


4

I went to WPI, which runs on a system of four 7 week terms where the default load is 3 courses. I loved it. Advantages: Only 3 courses, so it's easier to manage time between them. More flexible to schedule pre-requisites. A course that sucks is over soon. Compressed time schedule makes reviewing for exams easier because you don't have to look back as far....


4

What is the impact of attending such program on academic careers? Direct - very little (unless it is very selective and prestigious and the committee is aware of it). But the biggest things are: how much you will actually learn and how much you will network. The later is more important (always you can learn by yourself, and most of learning is self-...


3

I once served as secretary for a summer school like this. I wasn't directly involved with reviewing applications (this was the scientific organizer's job), but from conversations with him, my understanding was that the recommendation letter was intended mainly to verify that the student is a real person, is genuinely working in the field, and is at an ...


3

The trouble with "what you're supposed to do" is that it often applies to some imaginary archetypal student or, worse, students of a very specific class and privilege. Not all students have the means to go without working, to help pay their own way through school. Academia is just starting to wake up to this fact, thanks to the consciousness raising of folks ...


3

While a topic is narrower than an area (for example, your area may be "solid state physics" and your topic "semiconductor tuning based on dopage"), it's probably true that for most people there is little difference between the two terms as far as colloquial usage is concerned. In other words, don't obsess about the difference -- though, if you want, ...


3

All you need to do is tell them politely, whatever you say is fine, include "I'm sorry" or some similar expression of regret, what you wrote is fine. More importantly, tell them now. Don't wait or spend time crafting the perfect message. The more heads up you give them the less impact you have on them. It's much more rude to wait writing the ...


2

Possible reasons for extensions: Not enough applications have been received The applications/applicants are not up to he expected standard (Almost the previous point in th esense that more applications is hoped to raise the standard) Something has happened in the bureaucracy that means an extension is necessary Sending in an application to meet a deadline ...


2

Ask. That is, send a polite email inquiring if there is any news. There's a possibility that the decisions have simply not been made yet - the organizers of the summer school, just like the rest of us, are busy and bad at keeping to deadlines - but it's still okay to ask (politely).


2

As usual, there is no clear answer. People are different. "Requests" are different - maybe, the request in your case was an honest, open-ended question and your department head is not surprised that you said No. Maybe the request was supposed to be a rhetorical question, and the department head was really surprised that you said No. How does one manage ...


2

Have you thought about NASA? I personally know a fair number of faculty who have spent summers working at Langley and Kennedy, and I can pull up a quick application form for JPL's summer faculty research program. A lot of people, faculty and researchers included, put NASA on a very high pedestal, but it is definitely an attainable position. I am not very ...


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