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0

You can work in the technology industry with a BSc in Business, you don't need a BSc in Computer Science. That said, it depends what exactly you want to do. Regardless, rather than acquiring two bachelor degrees, consider a MSc in Computer Science, rather than a BSc. That's the more common approach.


4

Ignore these ratings. Just like most people who go online to write reviews of restaurants and other places go to write (sometimes baseless) criticism and vent, students who go online to write review of their professor go to write (sometimes baseless) criticism and vent. This is heavily skewed against the professor. Add to that the fact that ratings can be ...


7

I am not a professor. Perhaps it would be useful to you to understand this from a student's perspective. I am a PhD candidate and did my undergrad at the same school I'm in the PhD program for. This has given me some unique insight into the difference between what is put on a review, and the actual person (one of whom I work with closely) in reality. ...


1

If it's a few people and your evals are otherwise fine then just ignore it. Everyone who gets a D or an F because they showed up high all the time and never learned anything will write a bad eval. Also you can ignore all your zoom class evals from last semester cause covid. If it's a consistent thing in all your evals it's probably you. Teaching is a skill ...


-1

I think the only way you could counter this is for you to produce a few introdutory video productions of what you are teaching and post them online or YouTube , that way students who have seen your bad reviews have an opportunity to make up their own minds


2

It is economical for a professor when you look at the correct 'currency' that an academic strives to maximize: For those who have decided to stay long-term in academia, this currency is not money (if money beyond the getting-food-on-the-table level were of importance, they'd not have stayed in academia long enough to become tenured professors) but academic ...


-4

You say you suspect "ADHD or essential tremor or some form of anxiety" but these are all rather divergent diagnoses, and the implication of a Kruger-Dunning effect ("the opposite of imposter syndrome" as you put it) is yet another issue that a neurological condition would be hard-pressed to explain. The entirety of your description, ...


0

I found a local newspaper article from 2008 reporting that four people had been convicted of fraud (in the UK) for cheating by personation in university exams. (I won't link to the article, because it names individuals whose convictions may now be spent.) I also found an article from 21st February 2017 mentioning that the UK government was considering ...


5

I question your premise. For the theoretical groups I have encountered it would be extremely unusual for the graduate students to not contribute to the professor's research. Yes, the professor may be more efficient at doing research. And the professor may have to heavily invest in the graduate students' training first. But overall over the course of an ...


2

At my Alma Mater, one particular tenured prof exclaimed the first lesson of grad students first class: "My lessons are aimed at the top 10% of you." He then proceeded to breeze through the curriculum and teach waaay above it Not all profs are incentivized to teach grads. This particular one did it to find future academics in his field.


6

At my university and several others I know of, our annual raises are based in part on a 'merit score'; all of our activity (publications, undergrad and grad teaching, grad mentoring, departmental and University service) is tabulated [by us] and judged [by a departmental committee or by the department chair]. Faculty with above-average merit scores get above-...


4

As a professor you typically like to do and/or teach science and have influence over what research is done in your field. You also like to stay employed. Your department will do well if it can teach and/or research well. The likelihood that you are perceived as being effective typically increases if you can increase your output in either field (with ...


10

If you are not tenured, one criterion for tenure will be how many (successfully completed, ideally) PhD theses you have supervised. If you apply for a grant, showing that you successfully supervised X PhD students will help. In addition, having good students increases your publication output, which is again helpful when applying for grants. You might ...


11

It's a requirement of their job. (Longer version: in the UK at least, universities seem to be increasingly setting explicit requirements of academic positions, and at least some of those lists of requirements set out minimum rates of research students you must have graduate under your supervision.)


38

Since you mention economic incentives, one obvious answer might be for teaching, at least this was the way it was in Germany. Even the most theoretical professor is supposed to teach a certain number of classes each semester. Generally the work involved in this is too much for one person alone, that is why the professor is supposed to do the lectures and the ...


13

A few reasons: It might be required by the funding agency. Graduate students let the professor expand his/her research program. If one is interested in the results, but don't have the time to do it yourself, then graduate students are great. Successful graduate students produce papers which have their advisor's name on them, and if they go on to become ...


-1

The student told you: "...needs to stay with her to help her with official processes related to her father's death". This suggests that there isn't much support from the family of the girlfriend. It's then best to talk to the student to assess whether there are now other issues causing a longer term impact beyond the usual formalities. Should that ...


11

Yes, of course. (Any discussion beyond this is over-thinking it...)


-2

All of this is U.S.-specific: Some history on this: A specific college (I think it was actually a truck driver's school) reported that student's were attending classes that they weren't. This caused financial-aid (i.e. funding) issues and seemed to be unethical and possibly illegal. (See the web-site: https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/confessions-...


3

Yes 1. Students are adults I largely agree with Dan Romik's answer, especially with emphasizing the voluntary nature of higher education. 2. The reasonableness of excuses However, saying that any excuse is a “reasonable” excuse, while true does not seem very useful to me. Instead, I want to introduce a handy way of thinking about excuses and how we might ...


4

Well, again this is a rather difficult topic to debate. What exactly do we mean by 'reasonable excuse'? Who decides what's reasonable? I'm not sure that there ever will be any definitive answer to the question of whether or not someone has good reason to miss class. As for the death of a girlfriend's father, I think that this is definitely one of those ...


13

I think your question is ill-posed. Why do you consider that a family member's death is justified and the death of a girlfriend's father is questionable? In some cases, we are emotionally much more attached to people who are not family members. Then, I think it is not appropriate to judge which one is "justified" or not. This is your personal ...


10

You are actually asking 2 questions: Is this a valid reason to miss class? How should grades be handled? Let's look at the questions one at a time. Is this a valid reason to miss class? I think it's important to see this from the students perspective. So let's get you into similar situations. The father of your husband/wife passed away, and he/she needs ...


36

Yes, this should be a reasonable excuse. Leaving aside the discussion in certain other answers about mandatory attendance policies and whether or not they're appropriate, there is an important factor that you haven't considered: University students are adults. Adults engage in romantic relationships that have traditionally been formalized with marriage. As ...


253

Edit: see below for some additional thoughts following OP’s revision of the question. Let me start with this basic premise: Your students are adults. Let me repeat that: your students are adults. That is one of the great luxuries of teaching in a higher education setting: you get to spend your time and energy actually teaching the subjects you are passionate ...


26

I don't think my university policy allows a student to miss quizzes/exams due to the death of the student's significant other, so I am assuming that the same policy would apply for missing classes. You'd have to check your university's policy, but I would be very surprised if this were correct. I'd urge you to double check. What I suspect is that university ...


54

Unless your university has an umbrella policy about absences, you as the instructor get to decide what you deem acceptable. In this case, I would first defer to what you wrote in the syllabus. A common type of wording is to allow "excused" absences, where a proof of an excuse can range from things like a doctor's note, official notice from the ...


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