114

I think it's reasonable for you not to support these circumstances, but also no need for you to report/escalate the situation to compel some change in behavior. In your place I'd advise your students A) that you cannot help with installation of non-standard copies, and B) you can't be responsible if the non-standard software they use prevents them from ...


77

Should we just let these things go? Yes. Either the situation is real, in which you would be causing great harm in refusing and distressing the student further OR the student is lying and they get an extra 48 hours. Do you really care if the student is getting an extra 48 hours? Is the ability to complete work within a very specific time frame one of the ...


64

Demanding a bereaved student get a doctor's note isn't an appropriate strategy. (A death certificate or notification would be more suitable, but still inappropriate, in many instances.) Can experienced instructors chime in on how we can be considerate to the student's personal lives while also hold on to our standards and be vigilant with academic ...


63

This sort of behavior by a professor is poor pedagogical technique and, in many cultures, poor etiquette. It is not misconduct and it is not rule breaking. If you are a student and a professor acts this way, you can criticise the behavior in any anonymous teaching evaluations. Otherwise, ignore it and move on. Receiving criticism, including bad quality ...


55

The game is: you listen, but then, you decide. Just because students don't like something, you do not have to do what they ask. Check whether what they say has merit, if so, you can promise to change for next year (or for the current if there is enough flexibility). Well-designed courses often cannot be massively adapted on the fly. I always explain to ...


50

It is not acceptable. If this is a one-time occurrence the supervisor (or anybody else doing the yelling) should apologize. When this happens regularly, the supervisor has an anger management problem. You should report it to the graduate chair. There is usually some way of resolving this “internally”. In the cases I heard, the unit apologized, the ...


41

It would be unethical for a professor to publish something written by students under the professor’s name without express consent (which is to be given free of any coercive pressure) and coauthorship for the student. (See this recent discussion on a related type of abuse.) It would also be self defeating and something that no competent professor I’ve met ...


38

Almost never. An example of an exigent circumstance would be a chemistry professor yelling at grad students who are in imminent danger of harm b/c of improper lab procedure. If these exigent events happen regularly then the supervisor graduate student relationship is not working and you need to leave.


36

Ideally, students who are really in a serious predicament should be able to get an extension. To allow this, but to minimize lying, I suggest that if you're free to set course policy, you: Make one or two extensions available no questions asked. Specifically tell the students that the intent of the policy is to accommodate them in case of serious emergency, ...


35

Let me translate: I am an adjunct professor at a University for a course where the students have to use a certain software "X" during the course. For your course, Students must use the software. students who apparently have had issues in installing the (legally distributed) student version of X The software provided by you is not working. One ...


30

This could be done in both a clumsy, rude way, and in a reasonable way. The apparent anonymity of the student in the critique is a step in the right direction. In terms of "what should you do?", um, well, not too much. The anonymity means that there was no public shaming... Yes, there is a shock in seeing one's work even anonymously discussed as a ...


22

I have several personal experiences to add to others here. I was one of four graduate students in George Mackey's course who volunteered to take complete notes. He then used those to write a book. We were thanked in the acknowledgments. I learned a lot. See The Mathematical Theory of Quantum Mechanics. Once when I decided to write a text after teaching a ...


20

I would worry a bit about asking the professor to "hire" your sibling. On the other hand, telling the professor that your sib is looking for a position in the same field and would like to meet them to talk about the possibilities would be entirely appropriate. If the two of them, without you, come to some understanding it would be better. And even ...


20

There are a few definitions of yelling in colloquial American English. Definition 1: Screaming with anger. This is never ok in a professional relationship; and if it happens regularly, it is a sign of a toxic work environment. This is not a good advisor. Definition 2: Criticism. For example, if you do a presentation and the advisor has a lot of professional ...


16

I'm thinking that "reprimand" may be the wrong idea here, and certainly in isn't your responsibility to police their behavior and report them to higher authority. You can, however, remind them of the responsibilities inherent in ethical and safe behavior and recommend that they not cross lines that an honest person wouldn't. I think that is the ...


16

No, it shouldn't be accepted, unless the student has done some serious damage. But that would probably be a rare event. Solution 1. Find a better advisor (advised) Solution 2. Yell back (not advised) Solution 3. Complain to a higher authority (conditionally advised) Solution 4. If the benefits of working with this idiot advisor outweigh the pain, force ...


11

Ugh. I cannot believe professors do this, either as a good example or (worse) a poor example. You said that you're in the US, so it's completely legal unless it's easy to infer who the student was--for example, if there are a very small number of people in the class--in which case it's a FERPA violation. If you believe it's a FERPA violation, then go to the ...


11

If it's true and you are being difficult about it the effect is far greater on the student (and potentially on you if they then complain) than if it's false and they get some extra time does that really affect you? Don't waste your valuable time on such matters, I don't think we study to try and become very good researchers to end up checking doctor's notes.....


10

I dont think there is any particular academic practice or advice that can be offered to help you here. Whether or not you take action to report potentially unlawful behaviours (of two very different kinds) is a practical and ethical decision that will involve a lot of factors that are specific to your situation and your personal views. There is certainly ...


10

It's very improbable. If you don't know the terminology, odds are you don't know what you're talking about and cannot contribute meaningfully to the field, especially if the field is theoretical physics (this field is complex enough that many physics graduates cannot contribute meaningfully to it). If I received a paper discussing, e.g., dark matter and it's ...


9

I's suggest to handle this similar to how such things are handled with employees, and I'd distinguish two cases: Where I am (Germany), employees get some accomodation when a close relative dies (typically would be 1 - 3 days paid leave when spouse, child or parent dies; usually needed to organize stuff plus the funeral day). We're talking here of a time ...


9

One extension with no questions ask is common and reasonable. You should not demand a grieving student show proof of a relative's death. I also wouldn't demand a sick student provide a doctor's note. Going forward, set a policy that any student who request an extension before an assignment or exam gets one extension, no questions asked. Treat your students ...


9

According to your question, your professor has specifically asked you to introduce good students to him, so if you think your sibling fits this criteria (and you evidently do) then you should feel free to introduce your sibling to the professor. I see no reason why that would need to be awkward. In terms of how to go about this, don't ask your professor to ...


9

It is possible, but very unlikely that such a paper would be published. It would be likely to confuse experts if you use terms that aren't standard, though good explanations would help. More seriously though, is that your lack of knowledge is likely to lead you to write things that experts consider trivial and that you might wind up making erroneous ...


7

How should I proceed? I am inclined towards reprimanding the students (privately). Note: this is not a question about the ethics of software piracy or of flouting social distancing regulations, but about the proper response to illicit behavior (which I have not personally witnessed) that happens off-campus. The ethics of this behaviour should be a key part ...


7

While I broadly agree that, for most people, introversion or shyness shouldn't be a reason to avoid all meetings, I think you're focussing on the wrong thing. The rules for your course are what they are, and from your description of the situation it doesn't sound like they're going to change. What you should focus on instead is that here is an opportunity ...


6

Your aim is to help educate better, in broad terms. So you need to look at everything in a class, primarily through that lens. What will help students best gain from the course? Is this going to help students become competent at the required material? That sort of thing. What you're doing now, is more "of they want it and it doesn't sound too awful, ...


6

I think you’ve hit on a subtle point here that plagues many mathematics students up to and including the advanced graduate level: evaluating yourself without external feedback is very, very difficult. In fact, it seems to me that the ability to evaluate your own level of understanding (in the context of studying pure math at least) and test when you ...


6

There are a couple of issues, but, assuming that students don't volunteer and aren't paid, the most important consideration is whether it has an "educational" purpose or not. As you state it, it sounds like you think it doesn't, but I've required my students to take notes, though not for my own use. In fact I've required them to give me back (...


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