271

I don't really think this is odd: they have been asked to send the assignment by email and they did. There isn't really a need to say anything further and they didn't. Maybe it would be slightly more courteous if they were to add a couple of words of greeting, but your job is not to be Emily Post. If the assignments were submitted on paper, and they left ...


259

Edit: see below for some additional thoughts following OP’s revision of the question. Let me start with this basic premise: Your students are adults. Let me repeat that: your students are adults. That is one of the great luxuries of teaching in a higher education setting: you get to spend your time and energy actually teaching the subjects you are passionate ...


197

Wait until after the course is over and grades are in: don't put your TA in a difficult situation. After that, you are just two adult humans, assuming you won't have any other courses with this TA.


194

This is an answer to a previous version of the question, where it was not clear that recording attendance was mandatory at the asker’s university. Therefore my answer does not cover the specific situation of the OP, but may still help others in a similar situation. 0) Allow all students in class and do not monitor attendance. They are adults and they come ...


193

There are professional/ethical rules at many universities relating to dating between students and staff, but these do not extend to imposing a permanent moratorium on dating between people who have previously attended that institution. Essentially you are asking if there are any professional or ethical issues in dating another adult who has no connection ...


158

Is it reasonable for them to ask me to teach everything from scratch because they couldn't attend the class? No, it's not. If a student wants to engage in extra-curricular activities during lecture hours, they had better be able to keep up with the course material independently.


147

Adhere to the guidelines and syllabus you posted. If students can get around consequences of late submission by arguing, you have set a precedent, and they (and future generations of students) will argue again the next time. Don't go there. Consciously cultivate a reputation that pointless arguments don't work with you. Next time, make it clear that "normal"...


144

You give a lot more information about the student than seems relevant to the question. That the student is applying to MIT for instance is neither here nor there. That your student is in high school may be slightly relevant. It feels awkward to have a high school student in a college/university course when they are not doing well, because usually ...


144

In my opinion, yes it is unreasonable. Disclaimer: I am a student in the Netherlands, different universities and countries might work differently. In all the courses I've followed I can't remember a single one that expected me to prepare for the first class. Usually the first half of the first lecture of a course is dedicated to explaining how the course ...


138

It's fine. As you say, these are open to the public, and it's common for family members, department members, and friends to attend. Since you perhaps are not "firmly" in any of these categories, asking whether it's okay to attend is probably a good idea -- but you've already done this and been given the green light. Enjoy.


133

At every (US) institution I've attended or worked at, there's been an official school-wide policy that students are expected to check their school email regularly, and that sending official communications there constitutes sufficient notification. So check your school's policies; if you have such a policy, then it's certainly appropriate to remind students ...


131

The existing answers seem to me extreme. I don't think some sort of draconian blanket "leaving-the-room policy" is needed here. I would suggest the following: For students leaving occasionally: Ignore it. They are adults and sometimes things in their lives may take higher priority than your class (e.g. going to the bathroom, feeling unwell, family ...


127

You don't need a "trick" to solve this problem. They're staying past the end of your scheduled office hours because you have been tolerant of this so far. (I suspect they completely missed your subtle hints.) It sounds like you have made it too easy for them to use you as a crutch, rather than doing the work on their own and then coming to you with specific,...


116

You would handle this the same way you would handle anything in class that impacts your ability to learn. You contact the instructor, and suggest that there is something disruptive going on.


114

I think it's reasonable for you not to support these circumstances, but also no need for you to report/escalate the situation to compel some change in behavior. In your place I'd advise your students A) that you cannot help with installation of non-standard copies, and B) you can't be responsible if the non-standard software they use prevents them from ...


112

What you're experiencing is pretty much what all college teachers are wrestling with all the time everywhere. Allow me to point out that the abyss of need can go much, much deeper than what you're currently dealing with. In the U.S., most college students are attending a community college. And most students entering U.S. community colleges do not have 8th ...


109

I would go with the computer room option. There are several issues with getting everyone to bring a laptop: As you mention, a few students may not have one, and this could cause embarrassment. People are using different operating systems, and may have different versions of the software installed. This increases the chance of code working on some computers ...


109

I think @cag51's answer ("it's fine") is actually a bit too mild. Please go if you can! Attitudes towards thesis defenses seem to vary a bit from program to program. My PhD program had a pretty strong (but informal) expectation that people would attend defenses, especially if they a) worked together b) worked in the same sub-field, or c) were friendly. That ...


103

I'll try to provide an answer in light of the fact that many answers here will come from professors who do not realize how common it is for some college institutions to have mandatory attendance-taking policies. First, I'll quote from the help page on the Blackboard Attendance feature, as it explains the different use-cases that made that feature necessary: ...


102

As an instructor, the best you can do is to offer your condolences and tell him to just ask you if he needs anything. For example, you could offer an extension on assignments. If he needs some time off from lectures, maybe a classmate who takes good lecture notes will agree to make a photocopy, or you could get the lectures to be recorded for him. Your ...


102

If you do this for a minority, then you will have to do it every time a few students have some excuse. I suggest that you don’t consider this and make it clear that if they miss lectures then it is up to them to catch up on material. Providing double or triple repeats of lectures due to a few absences, especially if unpaid, is not a good use of your time. ...


100

Sorry to hear that and calm down. I think the suggested approach is destructive and will only serve to highlight the property of being overly sensitive, defensive, and irritable. First, this is a small complaint possibly caused by miscommunication. It's not serious charges such as assault or sexual harassment. Miscommunications happen even we aren't ...


100

A professor should not be asking directly for money from the students. If the professor is scanning and printing things out for the students at her own expense, then something is wrong. Either the assignments and handouts should have been compiled into a course book, or the department should be helping to defray the professor's expenses. Regardless of the ...


96

I'd like to add that there is another reason for waiting until the class have been over for a while. There's a phenomenon of "love for authority." It happens a lot in academia, where the instructor would otherwise not be that interesting, but because of the moderate position of power (and the things that go with it, like being the perceived leader, self-...


94

Have you considered recording your lectures? Doing so and giving free access to your students allows them maximum agency in trading off attending lectures with other social/academic activities, and obviates the concern of having to repeat yourself -- simply refer students to the video/audio and move on. (Moreover, personally, I've been through courses ...


89

I think he lacks maturity and I told him if he wants to go to MIT that he should act like an MIT student and quit complaining and get his work done. The issue here is that you unpredictably added a large amount of extra work into the student's schedule that had to be done in a short time. What I would expect of a mature student taking eight courses is ...


87

When teaching large classes or multiple classes, it can be very helpful if the email, or even better the subject line, contains the key information about the class, section, group and assignment (and possibly TA). It should be the responsibility of the instructor to tell the students what is expected, if anything, in the syllabus and on the assignment itself....


86

In the United States, educational records - including the fact of your enrollment in this particular course - are protected by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). FERPA prohibits disclosure of personally identifiable information from education records without the student's consent (except for directory information, which class enrollment ...


86

"they're not done with ill intent" Although disruptive behaviours by people with autism/autistic people are not done with ill intent, they do usually respond well to clear boundaries and feedback. A useful concept to consider here is Theory of Mind (ToM), something that is almost always impaired in this group. Individuals with autism are impaired in ToM;...


85

Well, we are educating adults - and they should be able to decide what's good for them and what's bad. Of course, this philosophy does not work out really well in real classrooms - but some students are using their phones to look up terms I used or check concepts I was teaching online - yes, it really happens! What I'm doing is confronting them with the ...


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