391

No. This is completely unacceptable. Sometimes faculty rant on social media and email lists where they do not think students will see the comments. Even this is frowned upon if the student could realize it is them being made fun of. It is completely inappropriate to make fun of students on a public website with students names.


268

I don't really think this is odd: they have been asked to send the assignment by email and they did. There isn't really a need to say anything further and they didn't. Maybe it would be slightly more courteous if they were to add a couple of words of greeting, but your job is not to be Emily Post. If the assignments were submitted on paper, and they left ...


215

In addition to StrongBad's answer, this kind of behavior would also discourage students from asking questions in fear of finding themselves on the “stupid questions and answers” list. Given that “unacceptable” wasn’t defined further in the original question, I think this is also an important aspect that makes this sort of student shaming unacceptable. Except ...


208

I guess I'm going to be the contrary opinion here. I don't think your professor's request is reasonable at all. Class time is scheduled the way it is so that people can plan the rest of their lives around the schedule. In this case, nobody but you seems to have anything from 12:50 on, but that shouldn't encourage the prof to monopolize that time. Some may ...


192

This is an answer to a previous version of the question, where it was not clear that recording attendance was mandatory at the asker’s university. Therefore my answer does not cover the specific situation of the OP, but may still help others in a similar situation. 0) Allow all students in class and do not monitor attendance. They are adults and they come ...


191

There are professional/ethical rules at many universities relating to dating between students and staff, but these do not extend to imposing a permanent moratorium on dating between people who have previously attended that institution. Essentially you are asking if there are any professional or ethical issues in dating another adult who has no connection ...


186

I have responsibility for students with alternate needs within a Computer Science department and thus have professional experience of the situation you describe. It is not uncommon in our subject. Our experience is that computing attracts a higher proportion of students on the Autistic Spectrum than do other disciplines. We are operating with about (my ...


186

Wait until after the course is over and grades are in: don't put your TA in a difficult situation. After that, you are just two adult humans, assuming you won't have any other courses with this TA.


178

If you want a non-confrontation approach, simply repeat the question in English before answering it. Hearing the translation may help the student in question see how to phrase their questions in English. It also give a polite hint that the question should have been asked in English.


176

How to deal with this? Dear [student], Thank you for pointing this out. [1 or 2 more sentences of explanation] Sincerely, [your name]. What troubles me is the attitude, which I found it kind of offensive (but I might be wrong). Maybe the email is offensive, or maybe the student just wrote an email from their phone. Maybe they are actively trying to ...


171

Wait for two days, and if she doesn't give me an exact delivery date (which she probably won't), just give her a fail grade. Given that you already agreed to this extension, this is the only option you have. Do this. Honestly, you should not even have agreed to this extension. I understand that you were under stress when you agreed to it, but students ...


160

I am a student so this is coming from a student's perspective. I think you should be honest with them regarding what going into graduate school entails. For my case, none of the professors I initially talked to encouraged me to go to graduate school, and for good reason. Each of them stated what the cons were to going to graduate school and how the academic ...


156

Is it reasonable for them to ask me to teach everything from scratch because they couldn't attend the class? No, it's not. If a student wants to engage in extra-curricular activities during lecture hours, they had better be able to keep up with the course material independently.


145

Adhere to the guidelines and syllabus you posted. If students can get around consequences of late submission by arguing, you have set a precedent, and they (and future generations of students) will argue again the next time. Don't go there. Consciously cultivate a reputation that pointless arguments don't work with you. Next time, make it clear that "normal"...


145

In my opinion, yes it is unreasonable. Disclaimer: I am a student in the Netherlands, different universities and countries might work differently. In all the courses I've followed I can't remember a single one that expected me to prepare for the first class. Usually the first half of the first lecture of a course is dedicated to explaining how the course ...


144

(edited this answer to consider some points raised in the comments and try to address OP more constructively) Yes, it is acceptable for a professor to work to counter the effects of gender discrimination. Yes, it is acceptable for a professor to warn a male-predominant class to not discriminate against women by giving them the "easy" tasks. The professor ...


142

You give a lot more information about the student than seems relevant to the question. That the student is applying to MIT for instance is neither here nor there. That your student is in high school may be slightly relevant. It feels awkward to have a high school student in a college/university course when they are not doing well, because usually ...


137

It's fine. As you say, these are open to the public, and it's common for family members, department members, and friends to attend. Since you perhaps are not "firmly" in any of these categories, asking whether it's okay to attend is probably a good idea -- but you've already done this and been given the green light. Enjoy.


133

At every (US) institution I've attended or worked at, there's been an official school-wide policy that students are expected to check their school email regularly, and that sending official communications there constitutes sufficient notification. So check your school's policies; if you have such a policy, then it's certainly appropriate to remind students ...


132

I agree with you. I feel the request to put your salary on a slide (on the first slide, no less!) is rather unexpected, and quite frankly does not speak highly about the professionalism of your contact. I would decline this, for multiple reasons: Your salary is nobody's business. Not sure what more there is to say about this. Students are, for the largest ...


131

The existing answers seem to me extreme. I don't think some sort of draconian blanket "leaving-the-room policy" is needed here. I would suggest the following: For students leaving occasionally: Ignore it. They are adults and sometimes things in their lives may take higher priority than your class (e.g. going to the bathroom, feeling unwell, family ...


131

An arrogant sounding email does not mean that the person is arrogant. It is well-known that language and even the assumed personality in online communication differ from the real ones, sometimes very significantly (see e.g. internet troll and internet hero). There may be a bunch of other reasons why a person uses an offensive language without realising it, e....


127

Some short-ish advice: First: Realize that you can't save everyone. I'm on the other end of this, teaching at the community college, which is something like an academic M.A.S.H. unit. Some people you have to realize are, most unfortunately, unsaveable ("black-flagged" in medic parlance). The weakest students are, oddly, the ones most resistant to ...


126

Could I get some suggestion on how do I manage in such time? Is it normal for a early-age academia? No, this is common for academics of any age. Anonymous evaluations are notoriously a valve for students to express their dissatisfaction without having to be reflective, fair, or even truthful about it. If you ask for anonymous feedback, you will need to be ...


126

I think that you explained the situation very clearly and sensitively in your third paragraph, and that you should send a message to the student along the same lines. All you'd really have to say is that while you of course sympathize with the student, her performance on the final exam makes clear that she did not gain sufficient mastery of the course ...


123

You don't need a "trick" to solve this problem. They're staying past the end of your scheduled office hours because you have been tolerant of this so far. (I suspect they completely missed your subtle hints.) It sounds like you have made it too easy for them to use you as a crutch, rather than doing the work on their own and then coming to you with specific,...


114

You would handle this the same way you would handle anything in class that impacts your ability to learn. You contact the instructor, and suggest that there is something disruptive going on.


113

There are several things which are not mentioned in the email but which can be assumed when processing such a message: The student is actually trying to help everyone involved. Otherwise they wouldn't have bothered sending the correction. How did the student get to this stage? It seems likely that they first solved the exercise correctly, only to find that ...


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