4

Personal statements are a hold-over from an earlier era, where schools were more interested in assessing character. Even as late as the 80s (and still in places today) grad schools saw themselves as producing well-rounded, thoroughly awesome übermenschen, and not just anyone would do. Academia has become more and more professionalized, standardized, and ...


3

No, it is not necessary to justify the W on your transcript; however, it could be useful to address it indirectly. I took a course in Artificial Intelligence (AI) Course and had to withdraw from it as I could not manage the workload due to several other courses which were somewhat difficult. Self-assessing your limits is a valuable skill. You withdrew from ...


2

If this is the sort of thing you focus your SoP on you are making a big mistake - missing an opportunity. Your SoP should be about the future; your plans, goals, and how you intent to achieve them. Wasting words on 'splaining old stuff won't get you accepted. The CV and transcripts are about the past. The SoP is about the future. Only bring up the past for ...


1

There is a bit of a balance here. Yes, I'd suggest that you spend a few words on some topic that interests you a lot, though perhaps not so much as a "proposal". I'd also recommend that you don't commit yourself too deeply to following that precise line of interest for dissertation studies. Why... On the one hand, saying something indicates ...


1

No, you don't need to explain this as it's just a single course on your transcript. It's pretty common to have one W; it does not reflect badly on a student unless it's multiple courses over multiple semesters.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible