84

Usually, these relationships are financial. For example: In a paper talking about how Twitter has failed to police harassment, a professor who's an investor in an early-stage social network competitor would have to declare that. Similarly, board memberships, speaking gigs, etc. are things that would have to be declared. For example, while writing a paper ...


50

This sort of thing happens in both the social sciences AND physical sciences. For instance, often a scientist will collect data to test a theory but will also collect lots of extraneous data. Analyses on these extraneous data often should be considered exploratory and labeled as such (because significant results could be due to the multiple tests) [As ...


43

Speaking as one outside of the social sciences whose work has been strongly influenced by readings from social science, I think it may be clearer if you tease apart three concepts that are often conflated: rigor, funding, and importance: The mathematical or analytical rigor of a subject makes it more difficult for outsiders to understand or hold an opinion ...


40

As a matter of nomenclature, I would say that a conflict of interest is related to material gain (aka financial gains) that hinge on the results of your work going a certain way. @Fomite does a good job of describing this. What you're talking about is probably better described as bias. All researchers have some bias for their own work, this is normal and ...


30

This is an excellent question. I do think you (and others in similar situations) should speak up, but I realize this is very difficult to do. Two things I'd suggest: Try to figure out if the people you're dealing with understand that the methods they're proposing (p-hacking, etc.) are dodgy or not -- i.e. whether it's an issue of ethics or ignorance. This ...


24

Background: I'm an academic in psychology that endeavours to apply innovative statistical techniques to answer psychological research questions. Over the years I have shared some of your concerns. While standard training in undergraduate and postgraduate psychology teaches many advanced statistical techniques, it is often taught at a high level that focuses ...


21

Kenji, For the last few years, I have given a continuing education course called Common Mistakes in Using Statistics: Spotting Them and Avoiding Them. I hope that some of the approaches I have taken might be helpful to you in convincing your colleagues that changes are needed. First, I don't start out saying that things are unethical (although I might get ...


21

If you think this discovery was big enough for Nature or Science then why didn't you send the article to either of these journals? You can't tell people what to be excited about and if the work is good enough then it will make its own headlines. In the mean time, speaking to your university press officer seems like a good start and they can put something ...


17

The term "science" in English definitely does not include the humanities. There are ambiguous cases, where it is unclear how to draw the line between humanities and social sciences, but for example literature is never considered a science. If you wish to include the humanities, then you must use a broader term. Social sciences are a little trickier. At ...


15

You might have a good case if this course is manifestly not meeting the department's stated requirements or failing to cover the prerequisites for further courses. However, it's not clear from what you've written whether either of these is the case. The methodology for selecting the readings sounds unusual, but not obviously unreasonable, and seeing this ...


14

CS and WS are each concerned with a different kinds of questions, and the language their respective practitioners use simply reflects this difference. This is familiar to me, given that I've been on both sides of the divide (English Lit as an undergrad minor, cognitive science for my PhD). I got a glimpse of why it exists many years ago when I was in a ...


13

I think one thing you should bear in mind is that the superiority and appropriateness of a research method is determined by the nature of the research question. While quantitative methods have the advantage of, for example, being precise, qualitative research methods still have its place. Qualitative research captures aspects of the physical/social world ...


12

Firstly, the MLA has the following on its website; When Merriam-Webster indicates that a term is “capitalized” or “usually capitalized,” the MLA capitalizes the term in its publications. When Merriam-Webster indicates that a term is “often capitalized,” our practice varies. We usually lowercase sun, moon, and earth, but, following The Chicago ...


11

If you were to look up from your examination of how green the grass is on the quantitative side of the fence, you might notice someone peering in the opposite direction (Surprise! That's me!). Like you, I like learning theories on how the world works, but my early math background led me to a college major in Physics. Seeking more of a human connection in my ...


10

I get patronised by the guy whose randomised experiment allows him to get away with a t-test. How to react when that happens without sounding too defensive? I think this is the key aspect in your question. Once the "hardsplainer" starts patronizing you, you are on the defensive. And there is really no good way out of this situation once you react by ...


10

It certainly does happen. And when it does happen, people tend to leave academia for a job in industry, commercial sector, retail, etc. Unfortunately, the current culture of academia still tends to focus on success stories and turns a blind eye to unlucky candidates, almost treating them as they never existed. Your supervisor's response falls is this sad ...


9

I think that to answer this effectively, one needs to carefully distinguish between two concepts that are often conflated in discussing research: originality and significance. The originality of a piece of work is the degree to which it is distinguished from other pieces of work, while the significance of a piece of work is the intellectual impact that it ...


9

When you change institutions, you will need approval from your new institution's IRB to continue any human subjects research. From their perspective, the new institution is about to "start" working on your existing project so they will review them as normal projects using their normal process. Of course, the review process might be different since the ...


8

The notion of a curriculum vitae is confused by the fact that it gets used in two very different ways: A comprehensive list of all of one's academic accomplishments A short summary of one's background and skills (like an American resume) For a postdoc position, you will generally want to be using the first---at least, that has been the way it has been for ...


7

In the US, most doctorates in science and engineering are also a PhD even though our degrees aren't in philosophy. While other degrees exist, they are less common. I would suggest translating your degree as a PhD since most international audiences will understand that you mean an academic doctorate. That being said, I was able to get what Dr. rer. nat. ...


7

There is an important aspect of this dilemma which I did not see stated in your question: why is the opinion of the "hard-splainer" important to you? Depending on the answer to this question, there are a number of different approaches that you might take. Although I am in a "hard" field myself, I face similar dilemmas in my interdisciplinary work, as I ...


7

Been there, done that. Didn't even get a print out of the translated chapter, nor a hard copy of the edited volume. Make sure the article is at least of some interest to you personally, otherwise the whole process quickly becomes taxing. The assumption is also that you will translate into a language that is your mother language, or that will be even harder,...


6

I'm in a similar situation as you. I studied geography at Cambridge. I was interested in human geography -- I wanted to predict the growth of cities and calculate which side of the pavement people will walk on. Unfortunately, quantitative human geography has gone out of style at Cambridge and most other human geography institutions. Instead they argue about ...


6

Your instinctive concern about creating hypotheses out of data and pretending they were there from the outset is on the right track: In statistics, the so called chi-square test can be used to compare data with models which have been fitted out of the data themselves. However, for this, the chi-square test must be adapted to essentially "penalise" one's ...


6

Given the example you indicate, how about: "Yeah, a t-test is probably just fine if one has good data. But if you have really bad, realistic, data, you need much more sophisticated methods such as ..." Ideally mention computational methods the techo (the "techno-macho", or hardsplainer in your language) is not likely to know or understand. If they had only ...


5

If you are considering such classes, then go for it! You are right that basics of computer science have little to do with direct application (its unlikely that you will need to invent a new sorting algorithm). But: algorithmic thinking is invaluable, getting it at level of computer science students (rather than "computer science for liberal arts majors") ...


5

Many academic fields work on the premise that you examine the evidence and present an unbiased analysis of that evidence. There are fields (e.g., creative writing and the arts) that take a very different approach. That said, many fields that take an objective unbiased approach to the analysis focus on the readability much more than in the sciences. For ...


5

The reason there is so much conflicting advice going around about book publishing and book proposals is that in this area there are no clear rules, only different approaches, each with their own pros and cons, risks and rewards. Some authors do it one way, others do it another way; some publishers will only consider a largely complete manuscript, others are ...


5

You are confused between a conflict of interest and bias. A conflict of interest is when it is in your personal best interest if the results are interpreted in a particular way, regardless of whether that way is correct or not or supported by the data you have gathered. As others have said, that is most frequently financial, but there are other ...


5

From the perspective of the Netherlands and the social sciences I can say that international mobility is certainly common, but staying in your own country is even more common. I would say a small majority does indeed limit it's search to the Netherlands. This has consequences for the job market. Since the Netherlands is a small country the (sub-(sub-))...


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