New answers tagged

0

The traditional method to avoid these messes was to refer to any work as forthcoming until such a time as the work having definitely and definitively entered the literature. So yes, it did happen that certain papers were eternally immortalised as "forthcoming" - and as a reader you could be in for a bit of detective work (this was back when you had ...


1

Note. I am not a lawyer, so the advice is conservative. But self-plagiarism isn't normally a legal issue. Copyright is, however. If you don't cite either in the other then you can certainly be accused of self-plagiarism. I doubt that either Springer or IEEE would be happy with you if they notice. You have the additional problem that both will probably want ...


Top 50 recent answers are included