127

I would say no, unless this was explicitly prohibited beforehand. Look, what's the purpose of a test? To gauge the extent to which one has comprehended the material. The fact that you did the work indicates you do. Hell, the fact you did it on your own for fun deserves recognition. What's the point of re-doing the work while sitting in class during a test?...


97

What should you do? You should ask the professor politely and without imposing your pre-judgement on whether this is or is not prohibited by the rules of the class. You are not in a position to make this judgement. The only person who can give a definitive ruling is the professor who set the rules. I recommend an approach like: My teammate has ...


91

If I understand your description, there is no finding of academic misconduct against you. You have co-authorship of a retracted article, where the problem appears to have been caused by the misconduct of your co-author, and unbeknownst to you. The incident occurred when you were only a masters student acting under the direction of a professor. If this ...


74

Even if your department does not allow a "stapler" thesis, it is entirely reasonable to expect that you should be able to freely use this material in a thesis. In general, I would expect that you would have to include a copyright statement similar in form to hose that would be used were you to copy the entire paper outright. To cover against charges of ...


70

Like qsp, I'm not of the opinion that this is self-plagarism. Nor do I think it's an 'external library' by any meaningful sense of the word. For that matter, what are you expecting him to really do - he's already written code to do this, even if he wrote it again from scratch, is he not allowed to refer to other things he's done? I constantly look back at ...


65

Taking the complaint public shames both the author and the journal, which may be counterproductive if the journal is responsible and willing to act promptly (mistakes do happen, even for very good journals). I would thus recommend starting by reporting to the journal, which should have a procedure for dealing with such things. If the journal does not take ...


65

Chances are the journal ran your paper through an automated plagiarism checker (the only realistic way to check for plagiarism these days) and this 70% number is what the program found. That you found nothing using Turnitin isn't enough evidence to prove there was no plagiarism: a plagiarism checker is only as good as the data it has, and it's possible ...


51

In general, the rules and norms of a test - what is expected, what sources can be evaluated, if any, etc - should be known before the test is taken. This usually takes the form of a syllabus or verbal instructions at exam time. A typical set of norms is along the lines of: open book, open notes, no cooperation; closed book, open/limited notes (like 1-page ...


49

This is a grey area and depends on both the nature of the questions and the specific academic misconduct policy of your university/department/instructor. If you wish to reuse your answers, I would ask the instructor in person if it is okay. If they say yes, I would suggest getting an email confirmation that it is acceptable. That said, while there are many ...


46

No, but make sure you cite it and mention it, to avoid being accused of copying and pasting from Wikipedia. In any case, it is great that you have contributed to Wikipedia and I wish more people considered using pieces of their introductory chapters for Wikipedia. Just make sure that people know that you copied to, not from, Wikipedia. (I mean, the order is ...


43

Given that the publisher shut the journal down five years ago, there's not much more you can do at this point to have it removed or retracted at the source. Instead, I would disown/disavow the paper by not including it in your CV and by making sure it is de-listed from your Google Scholar, Web of Sciences, SCOPUS, and other author citation index listing ...


42

Firstly, quoting any work, including your own, without explicit attribution of the quote, is going to earn you a very bad reputation for plagiarism sooner or later. Just say no. Secondly, and to state the obvious, the introduction is there to introduce the rest of the paper. As each paper will be unique, so should the introduction be: the point is to lead ...


41

Your question raises interesting issues of honesty, teamwork and psychology. Let's examine how some of those ideas interact in your situation. Now, the course instructors have made it clear that we are not allowed to use any external libraries to perform certain classes of algorithms for this project. This students' prior code would fall under this ...


38

I'm afraid you are understanding "self-plagiarism" incorrectly. The purpose of coursework project is to help students understand the algorithms. That's why the professor does not allow the use of external libraries. However, in your case, your partner did implement the task by himself (if his partner in undergraduate did that, it is a different story). So he ...


37

Could I just hand in this essay, or would I violate some rules with that? If you wrote it as a personal exercise and it was never submitted to any course (i.e. never read), I can't see how anyone would notice the difference - provided you are right about the fact that it answers your assignment perfectly and you are not subconciously trying to make it fit ...


37

You do not need to make a fuss, or mention "plagiarism". All you need to do is to recommend adding a reference to the copied paper for each paragraph in question. That is a legitimate review comment, proposing an improvement in the draft paper. Andreas Blass, in a valuable comment, suggests something along the lines of "The following description of our ...


37

It is plagiarism only if you do not properly cite it. If you have not published the thesis itself, of course you can publish parts of it or summaries of it or even the whole thing unchanged. The requirement to avoid "self plagiarism" is to cite. For example, in the introduction write: This paper is taken from my thesis [title] done in [date] at [...


34

The dissertation is not a published work in the same sense as a journal or conference paper. It is normal for a recent graduate to take large chunks of their thesis, with minimal or no modification, and use the excerpts in more formal publications. You do not need to worry about self plagiarism in this context. The copying often goes the other way as well....


32

Yes. It is certainly okay. Indeed, general practice when writing a PhD thesis is to produce a number of publications that add up to the thesis, whether directly (using staples) or by a good deal of massage. Some published material may be omitted and some additional material may be included. There's no reason why this shouldn't apply to a Master's thesis, too....


31

The answer depends on the relationship between the papers, and I'm not sure which applies based on the information in your question. In computer science, at least, there are two general cases: The extension paper is the "extended journal version" of a previously published short-form work such as a conference paper, workshop paper, or extended abstract. In ...


31

I suggest that you report this to the journal or editor first. If they fail to properly react to it, you can still escalate this by making it public. While the journal is likely to blame for not using proper plagiarism detection mechanisms, they are also likely the victim here, not the culprit. Also, keep in mind that there may be reasons for this duplicate ...


30

This type of repeated submission of junk is something that I truly hate, but also don't know any good way of dealing with. The problem is that the same freedom that supports novel science also leaves room for this type of "publication-shopping." In essence: any more unified method of "disapproving" junk papers, to prevent them from wasting everybody's time,...


29

As I suggested in the comments: Regardless of whether or not this is an ethical thing to do, self-plagiarism only exists if you do not state that you have published this before. If the local journal accepts a translation of the paper as a submission and you do not break any copyright agreement with the original journal, as long as you do say that the ...


28

Typically, you will not write all of these papers simultaneously in parallel, but one after another. And each time you write a new paper related to the topic, you will have a learned a lot more, and you will have a much better idea of how to explain the setting, what are the right definitions, etc. Therefore you have a very good reason to re-write your ...


28

It is not inherently unethical to "recycle" previous coursework. It is only unethical to do so without the current professor's knowledge. Professors may determine, based on their own teaching philosophy and the circumstances of the course, whether or not it is acceptable to reuse work completed for previous courses. In this case, you told the professor ...


27

If we were to submit this to two different journals, is it plagiarism? Reusing text from another paper (even a closely related paper) without explicitly saying so would generally be considered self-plagiarism. Unless they have exceptionally permissive publishing agreements, you would be in violation of your agreements with both publishers if you didn't get ...


27

It's totally accepted to publish journal articles based on thesis chapters. For one thing, MS theses are not well abstracted or searchable. Even with Ph.D. theses, they are rarely looked at. Getting something into a journal article is doing the scientific community a favor. It's also good for you and your coworkers in terms of pub count. Consider the ...


26

Copying proposals to papers: I am sure many have not thought about this but many have copied material to and from proposals. Copying from a proposal to a paper should not be a problem since a proposal is normally not a publication and I have never come across a funding agency that claims copyright on proposal texts sent to them. If anyone knows of exceptions,...


25

There is such a thing as self-plagiarism, but I would say that your case (reusing a figure that you created and providing a citation to it) is not an instance of it. I also don't think it is unethical or unprofessional. As Ran G. says in his answer, just make sure you ask permission from the copyright holder (if it isn't you).


25

No. Unpublished work is unpublished. It's almost as if it doesn't exist. Given that it is your work, there is no case of plagiarism. I don't even think you need to cite yourself --- what would you actually be citing? Indeed, how would you prove that you plagiarised yourself? If your unpublished work has been circulated among other authors and has been ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible