If you need help with online teaching or other challenges in academia arising from the COVID-19 crisis, we have prepared this FAQ to get you started.

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12

I don't think you can or should "drop" the paper. To paraphrase the jewelry slogan, a publication is forever. You can't take it back just because you don't like the direction the journal has gone, or how people's opinions of the journal have shifted. Also, from a legal perspective, it's likely you signed a contract giving the journal the perpetual (and ...


12

Scopus uses its own sources for publications in the form of publisher provided content. Their selection procedure is explained here: https://www.elsevier.com/solutions/scopus/content/content-policy-and-selection There is no procedure to add individual documents to Scopus that I could find on their help pages. You should also be aware that it can take ...


7

It sounds like you don't understand what Scopus is. Scopus is a database of quality-curated journals and the articles published in those journals. It isn't meant to be comprehensive, and because it's quality-curated, it doesn't mean that all your papers will automatically end up in the database. Comparatively Google Scholar goes for comprehensiveness. It ...


7

Both (and neither). Like other citation metrics, the h-index compiled by these databases only depend on what's already in those databases. Both of them have quality barriers, which means you could well have been cited somewhere else but neither of these indexed it. That's why your Web of Science h-index is almost certainly going to be lower than your Google ...


5

You can simply publish your paper with your new name on it. It will appear in Scopus within your new author profile (with a newly created Scopus Author ID). Finaly, you can send a request to merge authors to Scopus (http://www.scopus.com/feedback/author/home.uri#/). All your Scopus records (with the former and new name) will be collected in a unique author ...


5

As Federico indicates, the contact form (“Ask a question”) has a field for suggesting correction to the index:       You can directly send them the papers in question: Please attach a copy of the missing or incorrect document, this is essential for us to verify the changes and make the corrections. While I don't have any direct experience with Scopus ...


4

I think this question can be answered via DBLP's FAQ, specifically: What are the criteria for dblp to index a journal or conference? In a nutshell, DBLP has a venue application and review process that seems to be applied to each newly included venue, During this process, a set of minimum standards for newly included venues is considered. One of these ...


4

First, Elsevier or Clarivate Analytics already monitor things like dramatic increases in the number of articles published. It's why excessive self-citation can and has lead to journals getting delisted. However you can still write to them to highlight potential problems. If you want to do this, the best way is to use their "contact us" forms on their ...


4

I don't think Scopus manages their indexing by what you call "Libraries" (you probably mean publishers, and I agree that many publishers seem to call their online publishing platforms something like "digital library"). Instead, Scopus selects individual titles for indexing. That means that not all titles offered in a specific "library" may be contained in ...


4

An easier way would be to "request to merge". Let's say that both 2 and 3 in the attached screenshots are you. Just mark the checkmark and click the "Request to merge" link. You might want to click "Show Profile Matches with One Document" before you look up all of your entries.


4

The entry for this journal in Scopus lists "from 2009 to 2015" - it records 307 papers from 2015. The last issue they have indexed is vol. 10 issue 12, and they have not as yet indexed any 2016 papers. The "to 2015" description seems to be standard for currently indexed journals; for example, Nature is listed as "1869 to 2015" despite being very much still ...


4

If your paper is submitted but not accepted or published, it is still time to withdraw your submission. This is generally done by writing to the editor. I would recommend to do this as soon as possible to avoid wasting editors and reviewers time. Now if the entire process is already over and you only have the APC to pay, it might be more difficult to ...


4

Go to the IEEE website and use the search they provide:


3

It seems to me that you haven't made any effort to find information in question, which is easily available online. To illustrate, just a very brief Internet search resulted in the following arguably relevant sources: SCImago Journal & Country Rank - International Science Ranking as well as Nature Index - Country Outputs. Note that Nature Index is a much ...


3

I got a reply from the Journal. I apparently articles are manually added and while the article is older, the journal has recently been added to Scopus. To answer the question: email the journal about this issue.


3

Something probably went wrong. It shouldn't take this long to index. I would contact the journal / publisher and ask. It's possible your article "did not pass" some criteria, but those aren't fixable by you - the criteria is probably something like "we need your files in this format and the publisher did not provide it".


3

Scopus provide a spreadsheet of journals which they index, or have indexed in the past. It is linked from this page. I have downloaded the spreadsheet, and in your case, the journal is specifically highlighted as no longer being indexed as they "do not meet the Scopus quality criteria anymore and therefore Scopus discontinued the forward capturing". However, ...


3

This is a really interesting question!! According to Clairvate Analytics WebofScience/WebofKnowledge), updating of the WOS collection occurs daily on Monday through Friday. This revelation, paired with @Andrew 's comment about Scopus, suggests that the lag time exists with the publisher and not the database compilers (i.e., how long before the publisher ...


3

Realistically, the main thing to increase the probability of the papers coming out of your conference being taken seriously is to: Convince a professional organization such as ACM, IEEE, or USENIX (to provide some examples for Computer Science, your field will surely have similar organizations) to print the proceedings and include them in their digital ...


3

The best thing to do would be checking directly why the two numbers differ. Both sites offer detailed information on how many citations got each of of your publications. It is very likely that a few publications (or citations to them) are simply missing from one of the sites, so this means that the higher result is the correct one. But it could also be an ...


2

Scopus, just like DBLP, has standards. In fact, if you look at Scopus' description of the conference coverage, it appears that they actually just scrape DBLP to get their computer science conference listings. As such, while I don't know about the particular conference that you mention, I would expect that anything that DBLP drops, Scopus will drop as well.


2

[UPDATE : 2018] Not sure if the solution i am proposing existed when the question was asked, but just for the sake of update : I guess the easiest way to check if a journal is indexed in Scopus or not is by using their search engine, you can search by ISSN or name of the journal. Here is a link where i search for the journal you are looking for : . ...


2

Scopus counts only peer-reviewed articles. What Google scholar counts is less clearly defined. Intuitively, if something looks like an academic source, then its citations are counted. This means that arXiv is definitely in. I've seen slides for talks hosted on academic webpages being counted, but not in a very consistent manner. I would suspect that most ...


2

Based on @Razvan P's hint, I wrote a little python3-script which solves your problem: ''' Created on 01.04.2018 @author: OBu ''' import requests import json from collections import Counter # for histogram eutils_basepath = 'https://eutils.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/eutils/' DB = 'pubmed' # please modify for other databases RETMAX = '100' #...


2

No, Scopus did not choose not to index your specific paper. Such decisions would undermine the purpose of an index. There are three reasons a paper may not be indexed in Scopus (or Web of Science or SciFinder etc.): The paper falls outside the index scope (journal is not indexed (or was not indexed at the time of publication), paper type is not indexed). ...


2

You can go to Web of Science and then search by author country. It unfortunately doesn't look like you can cover the entire database like this, but something like this would at least give partial results: Go to Web of Science. Enter a generic search term, such as "Science". If you're looking after a specific field, even better, use terms appropriate for ...


2

Author disambiguation is a big problem in most plattforms / citation databases, and an issue in much bibliometric work. I don't think you will find a quick fix. Orcid (which WoS sometimes provides) is aimed to partially solve this, but depends on researchers actually having and using Orcid. Scopus currently has a better functionality in finding publications ...


2

I would answer all your questions one by one. Question 1:Is this journal a scopus journal? Answer: In order to know if it is indexed by Scopus you need to visit the website of the journal and check it. Usually journals provide that information in their homepage. Question 2: Is it a good journal for your thesis? Answer: It is impossible for an ...


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