Hot answers tagged

184

It is possible. For the last eleven years (from the seventh month of my PhD trajectory onwards) I have worked the standard 40-hour work week: Monday through Friday, from nine to five. I don't work weekends, and I don't work evenings. Last Summer I got tenure. Even though it is possible, it is not necessarily easy. You will need to be very efficient within ...


111

I think this is a fairly bad idea, for the following reasons: It's largely shouting in the woods. Let's face it, while you may feel that your thesis is the only piece of work that's "truly yours", it will likely also be the least-read piece of your career. More to the point, your (presumed) target audience (young physicists in other departments) are very ...


92

If the proof is yours then of course you can publish it. And it is your duty to do it, because the literature is incomplete without it. Basically you say (but in more formal language): at the Holcombe Colloquium (August 2015), R.J. Blenkinsop asserted the following, without giving a proof: insert theorem here. no proof was given at Holcombe and there ...


83

Continue to publish your results in journals that will accept them. After a while people will be able to see for themselves whether the US group is ignoring your publications.


78

it only takes time and effort I think the answer to the question is already there. It takes time and effort. So it means it takes at least the money to pay the people for a long time. And effort means you need a lot of people. More precisely, for medical research, reagents, animal model, clinical test are really expensive. Many different drugs need to be ...


74

They are just flashy press releases. They're really not as cheap (including both capex and opex), easy, high yield, resistant to catalyst impurities, or scale-up able as written. I've been seeing these flashy press releases on thin film fuel cells and the like (methanol production, energy production, F-T synthesis, biodiesel, switchgrass etc.) since at ...


52

Obviously, the optimal solution is to contact the speaker, but he does not seem to reply. What can I do? You certainly can try to get your proof published as a stand-alone paper, but unless your proof is by itself a major intellectual achievement, I would advise against it. The problem is that you'll need to acknowledge in your paper that the result has ...


52

You write that your advisor said that you "committed severe ethical violations." But you don't say anything about what specifically you did, whether the accusations are true, or how you responded to that accusation. We simply cannot give you good advice without knowing more about these violations. Honestly it sounds like you don't understand ...


49

I actually disagree with the answer given, and having judged a fair number of high-end science fairs myself (not Intel, granted, but the all-Chicago science fair, which is essentially an Intel qualifier), took something different away from it. I am also close friends with a number of Intel finalists, and have discussed their experiences in depth. While ...


49

Yes, there exist such a field, but actually the development of scientific instrumentation is transversal to many fields. Note, however, that one typically specializes in scientific instrumentation of a certain kind. With just one life available, one cannot cover all types of instruments! One specific field is that of metrology. Metrology is the science of ...


48

Because technological developments and scientific discoveries are processes at very different size and time scales of a development often under very different boundary conditions (lab vs. real world surrounding) of an in series producable technological product. On average it often consumes even for easy transformable high-technology concepts and ideas 5-10 ...


46

How well this will work for your career depends entirely on your ambitions. If you want to become a professor, it will likely be very difficult to limit your work to a normal work-week. Competition for faculty positions is extremely high and many of your competitors will be working well beyond normal work-hours to make themselves as attractive as possible ...


45

The answer is very simple: ask your current supervisor and be completely transparent with them about the situation. Whatever is acceptable to them is the right answer. Standards for masters theses are much more flexible and inconsistent than for doctoral theses, so, for all practical intents and purposes, whatever your supervisor approves is acceptable. (But ...


44

One of the questions is why his students finish so fast. That's likely at the core of whether or not things are "Good" or "Bad". For example, some potential good reasons: His lab has stable funding, which means his students need to take fewer TA positions to fund themselves, and can work on research instead. Note that this might also be a bad thing if you ...


43

People's salaries cost money. Given the overheads of running a business or university, plus the cost of fringe benefits like retirement and health insurance, you can basically double someone's salary to get the full cost of employing them (whether the number is directly charged or comes in through a national healthcare/retirement scheme). If their talent's ...


38

You must quote copied text and cite it where it is quoted. Citations at the end are vague and can be misleadingly general. Specifically, it can give the impression that the cited works support all of the text on the page as a whole. Specific citations are honest in that they clearly delimit what is being cited from the rest of the content of the page.


37

we can factually show that our methods are 'better' and cleaner than theirs. Your methods may be better, but if their methods are adequate to support the results they claim, they may have good reasons to continue using their methods. They already have the equipment for their method in their lab. They are more familiar with the analytical techniques ...


36

I'm only personally aware of one student who failed his PhD defense (this is at an R1 US university). After his advisor refused to approve his thesis, he went over his head and got the department chair to schedule the defense anyway. Results were predictable. On the other hand, "major revisions" are very common, especially, I hear, in the humanities (in ...


34

This is a good question, but there is no consensus as to a good answer. Some people think mathematics is obviously a science, some people think it obviously isn't, and some just aren't sure. It's common to include mathematics as a special case of science in general discussions. For example, universities usually classify mathematics under the sciences, ...


34

The author holds copyright and is, in essence, claiming "all rights reserved". But he can't claim more than what the copyright law protects. You can't "own" ideas, but your expression of them can be protected by copyright. Patent law gives a limited (in time) exclusive right to exploit the idea, but not ownership of the idea itself. ...


30

I'm an experimenter, so in addition to the cost of some highly trained people's salaries and benefits and the cost of keeping the lights on and the white boards cleaned there is equipment and consumables. Some of the equipment is precision kit. Lots of it are produced in small runs because only a few hundred sites in the whole world need that kind of stuff, ...


28

It sounds to me like your professor has noticed a pattern of poor decisions on your side, and they cannot handle another one. Professors are human beings, and this one seems to have reached their limit. Whether they are being reasonable or overreacting is hard to judge without knowing all the details of your interactions and collaboration. But your professor ...


26

What you should expect, unfortunately, is a lot less attention and recognition than you expect. Most journal papers don't result in invitations to speak at conferences, and most conference talks are given to fairly small audiences. If and when you do speak, you'll probably get a lot of questions along the lines of: "I'm sure you aren't getting as good a ...


26

Collaborations almost never start with a cold email in my experience. All of my collaborations have involved people from my former lab, people I met at conference, or an obvious opportunity where I had the data and they had the analysis tool. Anecdote aside, I think you have to have something the other side will obviously want: a dataset, a method, a tool; ...


24

The way to learn to write is, simply, to write. But then get feedback on your writing and re-write in light of the feedback. The Software Patterns community has a process called Writer's Workshops that are quite detailed. When you submit a paper to a patterns conference you are assigned a Shepherd who is an experienced pattern writer, usually with ...


23

An answer that will probably not be optimally useful to you, but may be explanatory: I'm in mathematics, at a relatively good univ, relatively senior, generally very interested in "research" in a substantive (rather than "traditional publication") sense, but have done much of the traditional status-enhancing tenure-getting thing, too. And am enthusiastic ...


23

I received my PhD in statistics (US University) in three years. I came in with a master's degree, which sometimes makes a difference. I obtained a very desirable post-doc afterwards. No one has ever questioned me on why it "only" took three years. Three years is probably the lower bound. If you go below that, some people may raise an eyebrow. But if your ...


22

It is highly unlikely that anyone will accept theory-based research that concludes that a large range of experimental results are impossible to have been observed, even though multiple groups report observing them. You would have to offer an alternative explanation for why those groups have observed what they have, or accuse not just one scientist, or even ...


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