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5

The simple and short answer is Yes! You have the freedom to try and publish anything you want, assuming the publisher is accepting it. Now the long answer. Your concern is that since you do not have any expertise in this area you might do a poor job. This concern is valid and indeed there are high chances that you will do a poor job. But there is no rule ...


-1

Please do not do this! People like review papers precisely because they are written by acknowledged experts in the area. Just don’t, please!


4

This really depends on the field and the venue... In my own field, book chapters are almost useless for your goals - they come in two flavors: those where already accomplished authors write reviews of a subject and are considered highly but are written by people who do not need an introduction, and those solicited by publishers looking for cheap content they ...


3

My personal view is that the review article will hold more weight with an admissions committee, because it is more likely to be peer reviewed in a serious way. If the journal is well-respected, and particularly if the review is an "invited" one, then being part of the author list is a good way to say that your (or your group's) opinion on the topic ...


0

Original papers are extracted from researches that are innovative enough and have new and important achievements. All of d etails are given in these papers. They also have high scientific value.


0

There are a couple of methods to do this. I detail all 4 methods here https://medium.com/a-academic-librarians-thoughts-on-open-access/4-ways-to-find-review-papers-systematic-reviews-meta-analysis-and-other-rich-sources-of-82898aebb6e7 Use built-in filters that exist in databases like Pubmed, Scopus, Web of Science. However these tend to have somewhat ...


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