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1

It’s useful to keep in mind that the term “retraction” in the academic context is really a kind of shorthand for the act of the editorial board of a journal effectively stating that it does not stand behind the content of an article they published anymore. Thus, from that point on the article cannot enjoy the credibility of having been published in that ...


1

As in the other good answers: first, in the U.S. and western Europe, as far as I know, it is not the author's choice whether to "retract" or not, in the traditional peer-reviewed setting. Second, the editors/publishers probably will not want to make a practice of this, for several reasons. Third, doing so can make a mess of bibliographic citations ...


7

You probably won't be allowed to retract the article, so the ethics of it doesn't arise. See e.g. this policy on when retractions happen: Journal Editors should consider retracting a publication if: It contains infringements of professional ethical codes, such as multiple submissions, bogus claims of authorship, plagiarism, fraudulent use of data, etc. It ...


7

I doubt that it can be done, since a publisher was once happy enough to publish it. And if anyone has depended on this article, no matter how "primitive" you find it now, you would be disrupting the flow of scholarship. Whether that is ethical or not depends on your frame. Who now "owns" the work in a philosophical (not legal) sense. But, ...


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