133

The way to "retract" old work is to publish better work that references the old work and its errors. There should be nothing embarrassing about having found earlier errors and correcting them. You have grown in the interim. Every active academic will likely have such an experience at least once in their career. The earliest work was done when you were, ...


111

Technical aspects of withdrawal: Technically, you should be able to withdraw your manuscript from a journal any time prior to acceptance. This would usually be done either by using some kind of button in the submission management system, or by contacting the journal (e.g., editor, action editor, etc.). Ethics and norms of withdrawal: However, there are ...


106

If the main idea in the paper has been invalidated by the correction in the code, you would do well to try to retract the paper yourself. This is just a point of professional ethics. It also protects you in a way from future claims if people don't examine everything thoroughly. The journal may not be able to actually retract the paper, but might be able to ...


92

If I understand your description, there is no finding of academic misconduct against you. You have co-authorship of a retracted article, where the problem appears to have been caused by the misconduct of your co-author, and unbeknownst to you. The incident occurred when you were only a masters student acting under the direction of a professor. If this ...


88

I am interested in retracting my old journal articles. Would it have any negative effects on my academic career? Yes, it would have severe negative effects. Don't do this. Retraction is intended for two main types of situations: The paper contains serious errors that completely invalidate its conclusions and can't be fixed just by publishing a correction....


60

Without knowing the specifics of the papers you are referring to, it's difficult to respond exactly. In general, however, there is more than one way for a paper to be "wrong", and most "wrong" papers should not be retracted. The thing is, a paper typically contains more than just a single assertion. When you say that a paper is "proven wrong", it sounds ...


57

If you were in a position of more influence (e.g. a faculty member) or if you were a student at a university where you could be confident that the general attitude coincides with your own (such as most universities in the USA or Europe, at the very least), then I wouldn't hesitate a moment to notify the dean, and escalate the case further as necessary. No ...


40

Mistakes are "bad" in academia if you fail to disclose them once you know about them (which constitutes unethical behavior), or if they affect something that counts towards a formal credential (like a degree; which is unlikely for an arXiv submission). So, the way forward is: Inform your co-authors (if there were any). Upload an updated version of your ...


40

It is a strange case. You say that the author of the two papers is deceased. Given that and the other facts you have presented -- in particular both papers were published almost ten years ago, their flaws would be immediately suspected by any mathematician and are documented in the MathSciNet reviews -- it seems to me that the principal culprit and the ...


35

Will there be any positive gain thanks to the publishing of the code to me? Publishing the code is necessary to make the calculation reproducible and the results verifiable. If I were the referee of your paper I would likely insist that you publish the code. So the “positive gain” would be that your paper will not be rejected outright. It will also help ...


30

The h-index is defined mathematically based on the number of publications and citations. So the only question is what data source you are using to calculate the h-index. If that source removes publications and citation counts upon retraction, the answer is yes, the h-index can decrease. However, since this is source-based, you could even get occasional ...


30

You Absolutely Can Cite a Retracted Paper Research is about telling the truth about facts of reality. You can cite any fact of reality you want if it is relevant to your research; if someone says something, you can report that they said it. You can cite a published academic paper; you can cite a newspaper article; you can cite a letter; you can cite a Post-...


29

There is an even a bigger problem than the lack of innovation, with this paper. Any academic publication is a form of communication within a particular scholar community. If that community is not aware that a mathematical tool known for ages can solve one of their problems, there certainly is some merit in pointing that out. Maybe not enough to name the ...


28

The most important thing you need to do is figure out the copyright status. If you have given them exclusive rights to reproduce the work, then you may not be able to publish it anywhere else. It is likely that the copyright transfer was part of a publication contract where the publisher has agreed to publish your work in exchange for the copyright transfer. ...


27

Retract the article. That's what editors of reputable journals do when an author spontaneously asks for it for reasons of plagiarism. What other options were you considering? Adding a note saying "The authors admitted to have plagiarized large portions of this article but since our system did not detect it, we publish it anyway."? It's the duty of the ...


26

A good way of posting comments, anonymously or not, with a good chance that other people will read them and react is Pubpeer. Although not all fields are covered, you can post your criticism on many articles. Sometimes authors react, sometimes publishers take action, sometimes nothing happens. what leverage is usually in process for a retraction to ...


23

The effect of retractions on scientific careers has been studied, and the conclusion is essentially that retractions don't hurt scientists who are behaving carefully and ethically. For your case, it sounds like you were clearly exonerated, and that your only fault was being a junior researcher who wasn't proactive about ensuring honesty on the part of your ...


23

Plagiarism is the use of another author's ideas or words without proper credit. You haven't done that, so there's no need to worry about it. Also, people don't retract papers over trivial editing errors like this. However, since it's something that might be confusing to a reader, it may be worth asking the journal about printing a correction. Simply get ...


23

Your career as an academic is not over. It is likely that you will spend a considerable time "atoning" for this issue. It is also possible that you will become a better supervisor because of it. Regardless, you will need to manage this carefully and forcefully. As Director of a Graduate School, this is all I can say: "What a mess." This retraction is now ...


22

This is a difficult situation, because if your suspicions are correct, then there is remarkably unethical behavior going on. On the other hand, I wonder whether it's not quite as bad as it sounds. Submitting a dissertation containing a paper that has already been investigated and publicly retracted for plagiarism would require incredible chutzpah, and it ...


22

I think you are in a tough place, but it also seems like nothing you did caused the problem. It is all on your prof. Hopefully you will be able to explain that and the only effect is that you will have an interesting story to tell to your grand-children. But you should do what you can to get others in the university to write you letters of defense and to ...


22

Good question. As far as I can tell, the answer is "no" and the journal retracting the paper still retains copyright (if it was given the copyright in the first place). Here're some retraction policies: one, two, three. Although the question you ask is not discussed, two things can be noted: Even if a paper is retracted, the publisher still distributes it (...


19

It's decently common. I Googled for "peer review failure editor resign" and some examples are: 1, 2, 3, 4. You ask "Why would editors choose to publish [the paper] nevertheless?" There're many possible reasons as to why editors may choose to publish a flawed paper: Some members of the editorial board approved of the paper and still do, while others didn't (...


15

In the following, I may misinterpret what happened. In this case, please correct me. I just don’t want to append “if I understand correctly” to every second sentence. Let’s first consider whether you did anything wrong: As your “collaborator” designed the research underlying your paper, he was entitled to authorship. You understood that he waived that right,...


14

If you cite the study, then the citation should appear in the list of references. The exact way to note the retraction varies based on the citation style (e.g. APA, MLA, etc.), as Nate Eldredge mentions in his comment. However, the basic convention seems to be to note the retraction in parenthesis, as an additional part of the original reference. For ...


14

I agree with @buffy that, from your description, you should not attempt to retract your articles. However, the question you're asking is, "Would it have any negative effects on my academic career?" and the answer is almost certainly "Yes". Although not all retractions are evidence of fraud, incompetence, or dishonesty, one of those would still be the ...


14

Think of the history of scientific papers as being something like an informally maintained blockchain. The integrity of all depends on the continued presence of the old things whether they have been superseded or not. Even if they have been superseded for errors. The reason for this is that things get referenced in newer work. The new things may be ...


13

You might be able to withdraw/retract the manuscript. This might be possible using the web interface by which you submitted the manuscript. Alternatively, you can write to the editor or associate editor that is processing the manuscript. Do not submit the manuscript to another journal until you have withdrawn/retracted the manuscript. EDIT: The question has ...


13

@Buffy is certainly right that Science itself gains a lot if people publish their code. Papers without code (the norm in many scientific areas) are hard to reproduce or build upon. But you ask what you gain from this, or if it might harm your career. First of all, it is unlikely that somebody finds a major flaw in your program and it is even more unlikely ...


12

I don't know of any journal that one could expect to accept "I don't like your journal any more" as a legitimate reason for retraction: a good journal would probably just scoff at you, while a crappy or predatory journal is unlikely to meaningfully respond to any request for retraction, no matter how legitimate. Therefore, I don't think you should try to ...


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