93

Should I just tell him to talk to the instructor, and that my job is just marking? Yes. There's no point in getting into an extended argument with this student. The student thought his answers were correct and you explained why they were not correct. Since you've denied the student's appeal of the grade, the next appropriate step is generally for the ...


70

You'll very quickly learn that being an academic involves more than just writing research papers. Your time as a postdoc is when you can start learning about these other aspects, while building your own profile. A postdoc needs to do the following: Build a publication record. This will involve both what you are paid to do and your own line of research. Get ...


47

Let me add one item that Dave Clarke omitted, which I think is actually the most important: Separate your research reputation from your advisor's. Congratulations! You have enough of an independent research record to land a postdoctoral position. Unfortunately, that reputation is almost certainly deeply entangled with your PhD advisor's; deep down, many ...


40

First, and foremost, be very cautious about taking this issue outside of the scientific realm of argument. If you start to file ethics charges or libel lawsuits, then you are likely to be casting yourself in the role of censorious scientific villain, and it is likely to not go well for you. Instead, if you feel that your work really is scientifically ...


27

Cases like that are best treated in "cold blood". Get one or two trusted friends to listen to your story and get them to give an outsider's view of how the blog appears. We cannot judge without further details how consolidated your work is, but I'll take here the stance that it is well-founded, scientific work without major methodological flaws. One thing ...


22

Very politely notify them your scholarship and RA position (or whatever it is called that requires you to do work in return for money) has ended, and offer a consulting rate to continue. Make sure there's an agreed-upon number of hours for each task, so they aren't thinking they can give you one hour of work at a time, when the emails alone take longer than ...


17

I disagree with much of your premise. It is the students responsibility not to cheat It is the responsibility of the professor to detect cheating when possible It is the responsibility of the institution to levy consequences for cheating All of this is done to uphold the quality of the degree sought and the reputation of the institution. Finally, ...


16

In cases where the student does not agree with your reasoning and grading and discussion does not help, I recommend the procedure, I have described here: Say that this will be dealt with by the instructor of the course and to let instructor do this the student has to write down on paper why he thinks that the grading was not correct and in which way it ...


14

Parts of your question are too circumstance-specific to really be answerable without more details, but a couple of the final points can be answered a bit. Is it worth it to keep fighting these battles all by myself if they still benefit? You sound like you resent the fact that they still benefit. That’s the wrong thing to be focusing on: the question is,...


10

No, this really wouldn't fall under anybody's definition of "volunteer" work. If you were part of a larger group that was advocating such benefits for an entire group (or doing it on someone else's behalf), that might be different. But under the present circumstances—since you're doing it for your own benefit—it's not really volunteering.


7

Just to clarify, when you say "holding their recommendation letters hostage", do you mean that that other group would refuse to provide you a recommendation letter, or that your advisor would refuse to write you one, if you didn't do the required work? My first advice would be to talk to your advisor, especially since your scholarship has run its course. No ...


7

If I am understanding your situation correctly, when you were hired you had a certain understanding with your department and university about your duties, which included both teaching and research. Since you don't say otherwise, it sounds like there are "standard" such duties in your department. Also there was a standard contract, and by some strange ...


7

Yes, contracts matter, as they define the legal obligations between you and your employer. Note that it is not the contract only, but also the legal framework on which it is built (laws and decrees directly applicable to your situation). But, you have correctly identified the correct question to ask: even if the law is on your side, is it worth picking this ...


6

As one of the commenters noted, you have all the power and he has almost none. You must consider the possibility, albeit remote, that he has a point, but might just not be able to get it across. That doesn't mean you have to argue with him forever. On the contrary: Move things into writing. Tell him to submit his appeal in writing (and say that by email ...


5

If you mean to ask, are there places where the teacher and the institution can ignore the possibility/responsibility for preventing cheating, relying entirely on the honor/integrity/ethics of the students, the answer is a qualified yes. There are places with formal honor codes that the student signs. The penalties for breaking it can be severe, hence the ...


5

Don't explain to the student why he is incorrect; place the burden on him to demonstrate that he is correct. Propose a deal with the student that would give him most of the power by conditionally accepting that you are wrong. Tell him that you're willing to hear his side, admit that you are wrong and reconsider your marking of his assignment on the ...


4

This sounds like a potential big screw up. If your contract says one thing and you were promise another, you should put up a fight. Certainly, put up the fight before signing anything. Contracts matter when someone tries to get you to do something you would rather not do. If you don't want a heavy teaching loads, then your research-only contract would help ...


4

My question is, which responsibilities cannot be avoided by a PI without necessarily producing severe negative consequences? If after a cursory examination, a PI's career seems to be going well, which responsibilities can we be certain that they have not neglected? In my (extensive) experience with large labs, the only responsibilities that a senior ...


4

The academic standards require that the paper explains how the compound was obtained, so that the results can be reproduced by others. So, either: The product is commercial, and the paper should say how it was obtained? if it's not stated, you can ask the authors for the provider and reference. They extracted the product from a natural source, and then the ...


3

As Heitz points out, it's a fallacy to think these are mutually exclusive. The student unquestionably has the responsibility not to cheat. Also, the teacher and institution have the responsibility to create policies that discourage and deter cheating. It is definitely a detriment to honest students, and to the reputation of the institution overall, if ...


3

ad 1) Once you have graduated and you are not employed in the lab anymore nobody can force you to do work. That being said there are a few options for you that might be interesting (but it depends what you actually want): If you are interested in a publication record then agree with your former PhD supervisor that you co-author all papers you gave support ...


3

You don't really have a problem here in most situations. If they are willing to have their name still applied and you are willing to do the work, then just do it. If they don't want their name applied to the work then ask them to remove themselves as authors and just acknowledge them in the future work. The problem would occur if they don't want it ...


3

You may want to move your interaction to paper - email or written comment. If the student thinks that their grade is unfair, have them document why, and respond in kind. That way it doesn't turn into a weird explosive situation and it will force them to really think about whether or not they deserve a better grade. This also removes you from the liability ...


2

It might be worth taking some time to familiarise yourself with some related cases. I can only think of one off-hand, but I'm sure that others could point to more. It could be reassuring to know that this sort of thing happens to other people, and that they survive. I'm thinking of Terrance Deacon. In this case, the defendant won the case, but only ...


1

The amount of remote help you supplied sounds rather excessive from your description. It's not unusual to get the occasional email about specific aspects of your previous work from PhD students that continue with related work, but your description goes very far beyond that. In general, you're not obligated to work for free. If it is of interest for you, ...


1

Document the time you spend then send an email to your supervisor and their manager / Dean stating that this is work which needs to be supported ie paid for. Then see what they do.


1

I agree with a lot in the other answers but wanted to add a few things. If you want to publish, then do it. If you decide to just archive some as tech reports, then do that. I understand this is a lot of work. Only you can decide how to allocate your efforts. How to publish? Some ideas to just get it done... (1) Aim lower. Either continue submitting to ...


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