New answers tagged

2

Is it my responsibility as an undergrad student to figure out if my thesis is affordable? Usually, no. This is an example of where your faculty advisor should help you. Do take a few minutes to research costs before discussing it with your advisor. There might be exceptions if, based on your area of study, you were expected to know about costs already.


1

It's great that you're taking the lead and refining your ideas to come up with a well-defined research proposal. Your prospective advisors will appreciate the effort and it will likely increase the chances of them accepting you as their student. Cost is certainly an important aspect in determining the feasibility of a project. From your question, it appears ...


-3

Maybe your best approach is to contact manufacturers who would have an interest in commercialisation and see what advice and resources you can get from them


2

Work in Progress is good and it is good to have such a section. You can also annotate each paper title with the expected time to (or of) submission. "Submission expected in December 2020", for example.


5

If a publication is either published or accepted at a journal, list it under your "normal" publications - if you want, you can choose the caption "Peer-reviewed publications". If it is not published yet, write "accepted at $JOURNAL", or similar. If the paper is still under review, or otherwise not published at a peer-reviewed ...


1

You have scientific research experience relevant to the position you're applying for, so explain that experience in your application. You can mention that you worked with graduate students and you could even ask one of them for a letter of recommendation. You cannot mention working with a professor, because you didn't, nonetheless, they may be willing to ...


4

Yes, is the short answer, and in fact it happens all the time. Go check out the journal Acta Astronautica for just one example - it is a journal about technologies and techniques for space exploration. Many of the articles outline advanced space mission concepts and are done entirely in simulation, both because it is expensive (thus there is no budget to ...


1

Be prepared to ask for what you want. It might be that the PhD student had in mind an informal relationship. But if you would like some formal title or recognition, then the PhD student might be happy to try to arrange it for you. Consider looking within your own university for recognition. The PhD student might not know how to accommodate such a request. ...


5

I was told by the PhD that if I'm to accept, she will have to seek permission from her PI / keep the PI in the loop - which makes me feel that it's probably official but I'm not sure. The PhD student likely has no authority nor budget to hire you. They're trying to establish whether you'd take a position if formally offered. If you will, they'll go and get ...


2

I don't actually know what "official" means. If your institution has some definitions for such things then it makes sense, but people can't normally just make up titles for things. They can, of course, provide letters in which things are described informally using words that sound like titles. But "official" depends on some institutional ...


5

There are two things that require funds for a summer studentship: Paying the student living costs The cost of the research materials themselves (which might be more or less important depending on the subject, but in my field we budget about £10,000 (~$15,000) a for a full time year per researcher. As has been pointed out it depending on the local laws, you ...


3

You've been told by faculty members that they don't have the funds [to pay you]. Since you aren't interested in getting paid, you could approach faculty members again. Explain you're willing to work for free. Whether that's possible depends on the country's employment law. Another answer discusses the ethics of working for free and argues that it benefits ...


0

You're right that it's hard for an undergraduate to know where to start, and you've done the right thing by asking professors at your own university first. The next thing to try would be to ask those professors again, but instead of asking to work with them, ask for their suggestions of a couple of people at other universities who you could get in touch with....


2

Just call it "Research Experience." The fact that you happened to earn course credit at the same time you did the research is irrelevant to the needs of employers.


4

A CV should allow to access the relevant information to judge if someone is (at least potentially) a suitable candidate quickly and easily. This is true even more so if you are going to cold-email people. Professors get lots of such emails. They will first have a very quick look at your CV, and only if it looks like it might be a reasonable candidate to ...


4

I'm sure that the recipient won't really be concerned with which template you use for your CV or cover letter. Most probably they are not familiar with what templates are available. What they will be concerned about is the contents, and do you offer what experience and qualifications they are looking for. The documents just have to look respectable, that ...


0

Contrary to some of the other answers, Id suggest that you have a conversation with your advisor about it. Don't make assumptions. But ask what the advisor thinks what would be appropriate here, putting them on notice that you have thought about the issue and have some preferences. But making any assumption without having this discussion could lead to ...


0

The co-authorship route is probably better, and there are several benefits you would get from him. A scientific research article is written in a different way to most other types of articles, so you would be getting mentorship in scientific writing. Without this mentorship you may have much more difficulty in getting the paper accepted due to your unusual ...


6

Just go with co-authorship You're an undergraduate researcher. This is a case where having co-authorship is actually better than sole authorship. You said yourself it isn't groundbreaking. By doing co-authorship you've created a google trail back to this professor. When people are googling the professor's name, your paper will come up. When people google ...


-1

His PhD student assigned me the project, so I haven't spoken to my actual supervisor all summer. Should I a. go ahead with the project and send him my final work when I come up with a viable solution and potentially the abstract for the paper b. email him and ask him if I can move forward with this approach In terms of pecking order I would at least make ...


2

A polite and concise email to the postdoc will suffice. As an undergraduate in my early years, I think I'm still figuring out my interests A postdoc researcher will certainly understand this sentiment. There is no need to go into details about you not finding their work interesting, but rather focus on changes in your interests. Since I haven't been ...


1

First, a lot of people wind up in graduate schools that are rated better/higher than their undergraduate institutions. It can have some impact, but is normally not determinative. Of course, it is harder to get in to "top" universities than others since the competition is much stronger, but it is still possible if your application materials clearly ...


Top 50 recent answers are included