13

Whether or not a disease is listed in some manual is irrelevant for whether or not one can or should do research about it. For example, COVID-19 wasn't listed in any general medicine equivalent of the DSM (specifically, the International Classification of Diseases or ICD) -- because it was a new disease --, but it is a disease alright and research on it is ...


9

The methodological processes in scientific fields exist precisely to give researchers an objective method they can follow to answer questions, without contaminating the research with personal bias. Presumably, the kinds of psychological research leading to listings in the DSM involves some objective scientific work based on systematic empirical observation ...


6

You can do research on anything you like, for any reason. That your own acknowledged experience motivates you will not surprise anyone. A web search for your topic produces many links to what seem to be respectable sources, so any useful contribution you can make will probably be recognized by that community.


1

This answer may be too late for you personally, but I hope others might benefit. Let me focus on the questions you might ask. First: What would I learn from this experience? (What am I most likely to learn?). This places you as a student. Second: What do you think I can contribute to this project? This assumes they have read your CV. Third: What skills and ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible