51

First, if you think the manuscript is not worth submitting even after major revisions, or in other words, if you as a referee would recommend its rejection, then the answer is clear - you shouldn't be coauthor. However it seems that you evaluate the manuscript as ok-ish, and the main concern is that its content is somehow outdated. I would do what your old ...


24

TL;DR Top journals tend to have that reputation because they're regularly publishing top papers. Similarly, journals that have a reputation for being "merely" pretty good tend to mostly publish papers that are "merely" pretty good. I think that far and away the most important reason that certain journals acquire reputations for being strong journals is that ...


13

Does the size of a university play any role in someone's PhD research experience in Germany? First of all, I am assuming that your PhD does not contain any course components, because that’s the norm in Germany. Otherwise, it gets complicated and strongly depends on the PhD programme in question. When doing a PhD, the vast majority happens within your group....


10

As already discussed in another answer, journals that get a reputation for publishing good-quality papers are likely to receive more good-quality papers. However, you ask what a journal can do to influence this, and stimulate an upwards movement in the journal's reputation. The answer to this must be "make the author's experience with my journal better than ...


6

Being co-author on a paper is formal acknowledgement that you endorse the publication of the paper. I would not accept this if you feel there are major errors. Can you request an acknowledgement (in the acknowledgements section) so you have some formal record of your contribution to this work, but without exposing yourself to potential issues of being an ...


5

Better to withdraw explicitly rather than just disappear. After you decide which are the projects that you can and must stick with, go to the leader(s) of the others - in person - and tell them you must withdraw. Tell them your "youthful enthusiasm" overcame your good sense and you are in danger of shortchanging everyone's expectations and that you value ...


3

On the other hand, if I would be named as a co-author, this would be my first publication and maybe this would count as "better than nothing", or people would acknowledge the fact that I contributed to some okay-ish research in my early bachelors. In general these considerations are probably more important. The "not-too-bad" (although you have assessed the ...


2

The answer is a resounding no, they don't carry the same reputation. The npj journals are quite clearly on a lower rung of the prestige ladder. You can easily verify this by comparing the impact factors, which is >40 for Nature, and ~9 for npj Computational Materials, for example. It isn't only age either - the Nature Publishing Group clearly has an ...


2

Applying known stuff to applications outside of your field is of much value, especially for theoretic fields like Math, Computer Science, or Physics. For such papers its less about being on par with the latest research in the original field, but to identify problems where new methods can be applied. It is often difficult for people from applied fields to ...


2

As you have described the situation, you have been offered inclusion as a co-author in exchange for reviewing the paper. My feeling is that a courtesy has been extended to you, and where no obligation to do so exists. If you feel comfortable enough in your relationship with the actual authors, voice your concerns in as diplomatic manner as possible. You ...


2

Another thing to consider: depending on the fine details of the publication in question, it may be possible for you to fix as much as you can before submission, wait for the feedback, and then make additional fixes. I'm not suggesting that you submit a paper with errors in methodology/conclusions, but rather that reviewers may be willing to work with a ...


1

Perhaps one answer not currently covered by other answers is that journals actually don't mind carving out a niche even if the niche is just "somewhere niche papers will be published", i.e. a paper that is strong mathematically but produces a narrow result needs somewhere to go and there's not shame in the journals that accommodate such papers. Another ...


1

When I moved to my first faculty position, my advisor told me your time is your most valuable resource, be very careful how you commit it. It has proven to be very true, especially since I had my baby. As a young academic I drowned myself in commitments to a point I almost had a burnout. I will advise you differently than the rest: If you have committed ...


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