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3

Here the resolution/answer: I spoke to the second PI/co-author alone. He agreed that he thought the data were excellent, and suggested he speak to the other co-author alone, recommending I choose which journal to submit to. This was definitely the right move. Unfortunately, it turned out that there was a different motive: the first PI wanted to switch to a ...


11

I'd suggest you analyze your options in a more strategic way rather than going heads-on against the PI: First, is there a way to clarify things with the PI, maybe reach some kind of compromise? Ask them to clarify exactly what they mean by "politically incorrect" or "too slow". They might actually have reasonable conditions, in which ...


19

Jointly authored papers require permission from all authors. If he is a co-author and you can't convince him, then you are pretty much stuck. Editors will expect it. And fighting with your PI is probably not the wisest career move. It is a different story if the PI isn't one of the authors, but that only applies to the first point above, not the second. The &...


3

By comparing the CVs of academis who have permanent jobs with those who do not, you can show that publishing in a prestigious journal is, in fact, career changing. Having publications in prestigious journals is strongly correlated with later receiving a stable academic job. This in no way means that everyone should spend all their time on trying to publish ...


3

I am completely disillusioned with prestige at this point in my academic career. It is all about the strength of the peer review committee for me now, nothing less. I work on the intersection between engineering and computer science, so I get to read literature from both community and I cannot tell you how many completely **** paper makes it through the &...


1

From my perspective, you shall choose the journal that meets your research field and direction. It should be peer-reviewed and respected in your narrow area of research (ask your advisor/colleagues). Many groups prefer to publish mostly in Nature-like journals. I would say that there you see more like a future prospects rather than full results with ...


4

In principle, publishing in a prestigious journal may help reach many readers and/or boost your career. The practice of judging articles by the journals they appear in is widespread although also widely denounced (cf the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment). In practice, a lot depends on your field of research, your career stage, and the ...


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