63

Get your former advisor to sign the letter now. After that has succeeded or failed, you should contact the person who runs this process and ask them verbally how the letter will be used and what it contains. Probably this is a dean. Probably the dean already knows about your advisor's behavior. They might be seeking a letter that will help them get rid ...


46

You seem to think that an assistant professor should collaborate within your department. However, a more common view is that an assistant professor should be an independent researcher. An assistant professor should clearly distinguish their research from that of other faculty at the same institution. Assistant professors do not want to be asked, "Why ...


34

While collaboration is not a measure of success in the P&T process, the quality of the research conducted and published should be. How do I guide, mentor this young faculty member through the promotion and tenure process, so that they understand the importance of collaborating with the experts within the department? You seem to be contradicting yourself ...


22

UK perspective (1) What do you make of this? They think you are good enough to be recruited directly to the higher-ranking grade. It sounds reasonable in light of your seven years' postdoc experience plus having publications commensurate with the grade. They obviously think you are an outstanding candidate, and may be offering you the higher-ranking grade ...


20

All of this is going to be very field- and country-specific. I will answer for biological/biomedical sciences at UK universities. The career progression at most UK universities is: Lecturer → Senior Lecturer → Reader → Full professor In the UK there is no such thing as tenure unless you got it before 1987. However sacking someone from any job in the UK is ...


17

I have been told by our head of department that those on the promotions panel will never have heard of FOCS, STOC and SODA and so this will just be compared with the number papers people publish in any other venue. I find this stance outrageous. It is the promotion committee's responsibility to understand—at least at a high level—the publication landscape ...


15

In China academic positions are filled on the basis of publication record. If your total points (dependent on the impact factor of your published works) is higher than a particular number, you can directly be appointed to an associate or professor rank. I don't know if there's any document to back my claim, but I know this from my researcher friends from ...


11

They are really not very similar at all. (This answer describes common structures at US universities.) There are a number of very significant differences between "promotion" in academia and in industry. The vast majority of faculty members will be promoted at most twice in their entire career. Once from Assistant Professor to Associate Professor, and ...


11

I read this with interest bc I had the same experience and felt the same way with one of my advisers who also happened to teach several of the classes for the program I was in. I was going to be a teacher and he made it so miserable that, while I finished the program, I decided not to pursue teaching. I had one last requirement, to create a personal ...


10

I don't know whether it is common, but a version of it, a 4th-year review, exists (determined by department pattern of administration) at Ohio State, and it's actually useful. It gives the candidate a good feel for what the actual tenure review will be like the next year, and alerts them to problems that can be remedied. Letter writers are usually asked to ...


10

The site Conference Ranks helpfully compiles conference rankings from three sources. Two are "objective" (based on the citations) and the third is "subjective" (based on the opinions of people in the field). (Personally, I think the latter is more meaningful in this case, but your institution might disagree, so it's nice to have both.) More generally, ...


9

(I'm very sorry for your troubles...) To supplement other comments and answers: In my experience (at R1 places in the U.S.), while mostly undergrads' and grad students' (broadly speaking) "disability issues" have a roughly appropriate procedure in place, just as an illustrative and ominous example, this does not seem to extend to grad students who've (e.g.)...


8

As in my comment, I've not heard of any such thing in mathematics, ... but hadn't really been worrying about it. It appears a gross inflation of things, yes, and wasteful, and so on, as in other comments. Yes, I fear a refusal could be used against the candidate, by anyone interested in pushing against them, despite the problems with this general direction....


8

Probably you will not be considered for promotion to professor. But you could still apply for position of professor, either there or at other institutions. (It may be considered bad form to start applying for other positions right away; wait a few years. And by then your "famous professor" may be willing to write a letter of recommendation for you.)


7

Disciplines are typically organized in loose groups around a fairly small number of persons. They organize conferences, are editors, are on boards of professional organizations, etc. They are always looking for the next generation, new researchers who could take over when they retire. Being a guest editor for a journal, organize a workshop, chair a session, ...


7

This might be possible, but only if you arrange it at the very beginning. But first, note that "Full Professor" in Europe and "Professor" in the US mean very different things. "Full Professor" is about the same in both places except that, I think, in Europe a department will have only one Full Professor and in the US there may be many. Here (US), Full ...


7

It seems that your core issue is that you've got three different things tangled up into one mess: You want a letter from your former advisor to support your immigration process. Your former advisor was abusive. Someone is asking you to write a letter supporting your former advisor's promotion. Personally, I don't think any of the three options you ...


6

I'm assuming that, among other things, you want to help the college develop a realistic plan that can be fairly applied in the future. First, a bit of background. The type of college that you describe, normally has primarily a teaching mission. But expectations of faculty are almost universally threefold: Teaching, Research, and Service. While other ...


6

The point of assessing funding is not to ask, "Is this person funded today?" Rather, it's to ask, "Will this person be funded in five, ten, and fifteen years?" And the point of asking about funding is two-fold. Over that time period, will this person be performing high quality work that makes our department and university look better? And will this person ...


6

Different countries have different systems, and job titles do not always translate well across borders. I suspect most people looking at your (future) CV will not read too much into the fact that your title is said to be 'Associate Professor'. They will judge you based on their perception of your achievements and stature, and mentally classify you within ...


5

My advice is that you decide exactly what you feel would be an appropriate accommodation and then check with whatever office handles disability issues for faculty about how to document that accommodation. Unfortunately, many US universities are still behind the curve in accommodating faculty with disabilities, so you may need to be persistent. Do not "...


5

(My answer assumes that you are in the US, or another country with a similar tenure system.) Summary: Ask your local experts. Every reputable university should have written documentation of the policies, procedures, and standards for tenure-track faculty promotions. Here are the procedures for my university. Read yours. Today. Now. Really, you should have ...


5

If this is a request from outside your university, tell them no, and tell them why. If this is from inside your university, get with your department chair and go to the dean in question. You don't want to seem uncollegial, and you don't want to be seen as refusing to write a letter for this specific person, but I think you're right to want to cut this off ...


5

I wouldn't worry a lot about it. The worst that can happen is that part of the letter sounds a little off, but I'm sure promotion committees see much worse in letters from students, and understand it doesn't reflect on the professionalism of the professor. If I had to chose, though, my personal inclination would be to write "Professor X" in the letter, ...


5

Within my U.S. math department, teaching a successful, energetic, research-oriented graduate "topics" course is a plus inside the department. It is also essential, within the department, to have demonstrated "acceptable" capacity to teach bread-and-butter courses, such as ... calculus. The engineering departments that determine the course of the "college of ...


5

There isn’t a precise rule about such things, but to the extent that one can formulate a general principle, I’d say that the credit for an N-author article would almost always be greater - often significantly greater - than a 1/N fraction of the total credit. That is why collaboration is generally a profitable activity - it allows two or more people to ...


5

In response to [research output] The professor might have his or her name on plenty of papers, but never as a first author. Presumably, the papers will look good on the postdocs' and PhD students' CV, not so much on the professor's. Is that the case? No. Being supervisor of successful PhD's and postdocs is a good thing of course. Each field has its own ...


5

When I recruit postdoc it’s under the assumption that they are taking on a transitional role. In some sense I believe it’s in both our interests to have them leave sooner if possible. It’s good for them (pay bump, tenure career starts etc), and for me it helps since it signals to future postdocs that I’m able to get them on the right track to a faculty ...


5

Speaking for the UK, it is understood that the local group of postdocs are likely, and even encouraged, to apply for lectureships that come open. Further, it is expected that they will be applying for permanent positions elsewhere as they come up as well. It's not unheard of for a postdoc to be offered a permanent position at another University only to be ...


4

You can request the letter but I would recommend that the request be directly sent by and returned to the chair of the department or the chair of the departmental P&T tenure committee. They can then decide if it should be attached to the P&T file. As far as sharing it via Google Drive or equivalent services, I would suggest that you investigate if ...


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