New answers tagged

-2

Complain to the university. You're paying good money to attend classes, and it wouldn't be ethical for a professor to do something that'd negatively impact your ability to attend your other classes. There's probably a Student Ombudsman, a Dean of Students, or someone with a similar position employed by your university, who might be able to help you make a ...


3

Is it unethical? Yes. Is it worse than the alternative (usually canceling class)? Probably only slightly. Is it worth reporting? Only if it happens repeatedly.


0

I think, you should build some patience and 3 days is not a long time of waiting. However, various reasons for the delay could be: You may not be only one student. He might be busy in research and administration. He might have traveled for a conference or something. He might have personal reasons for the delay. He definitely has higher priority works than ...


4

I don't know enough of the details to actually judge, but there is a benign explanation. You say the the course overall is quite elementary. You also say that it is focused elsewhere than security and that this is a side topic. Let me start with that. There is a Pedagogical Pattern called Spiral in which it is suggested that advanced topics can be ...


2

You might increase your chances if you find another recommender that can say better things about you. Ideally, someone with whom you already did an internship or project, who would better know how you do research. If you have not worked on any internship/project yet, it might still be better to ask a professor from a course in which you got a better grade. ...


6

If the teacher is not a reasonable person, and some are not, you should keep your head down and hope that your fellow students will get some real security training, at least on the job, before making decisions in this area. If the teacher is reasonable, select a very small number of references on the topic, preferably including peer-reviewed papers. Look ...


5

I also feel terrible every day about what I said to the Head of Department. They were the best teacher I’d ever had and they are also one of the foremost scholars in my current field. I think what you said to the Head of Department should have been expected and I think you should have been better supported. ‪My question is whether I should try to reach ...


0

I'm applying for master programs and the 16 selections are range from dream to match to safe, with about five in each category. Please for simplicities' sake, choose your top one out of each category, and save yourself so much time and stress. That would be 3 recommendation letters. If you must, add 1 or 2 backups and have a max of 5 needed letters. If ...


2

"Submitted manuscripts" count less, but are still viewed favorably. Uploading these to a preprint server and stating the preprint number is a plus. The only thing that could look strange are too many "manuscripts in preparation": a committee might wonder if you finish in time what you started.


5

I have been on tons of search committees for faculty members, and I would never look at this in a negative light. A submitted manuscript doesn't mean it is substandard work. Conversely, I believe, it means you are an active researcher and have the ability to build a substantial research agenda. I wouldn't worry about this in the least.


6

It's pretty hard to imagine that it would be a problem. More is generally better. And the time to publication for a submission can be long. It seems better that you keep working and submitting rather than waiting for one to complete the process. It shows you are active. Always a good thing.


1

I plan to apply approximately 16 schools and wondering whether they're too many for my recommendation letter providers...It's happened before that a professor of my friend regretted to provide all letters for him because they're too many. You needn't necessarily require a letter to support each application (unless that's strictly required). You may be able ...


-1

Consider how long it will take for your professor to write one great recommendation letter for you. Next, consider how much time it might take your professor to produce 16 fantastic recommendation letters for you. Most people will do a fairly awful job if they feel they are being undervalued or asked to serve unreasonable requests. That you are asking the ...


6

Unlike the other answers, I do not think the professor's time spent customizing is an issue. Customizing a letter does not take that long. Professors have lots of practice. Submitting it can take longer due to low quality submission systems. But writing the first letter is most of the work. The issue is that only one of these letters is worth submitting:...


-1

Inform your university’s disability office. They should be able to handle things appropriately. In most OECD countries, there is a law prohibiting discrimination against individuals with disabilities, and obligating workplaces and schools to provide reasonable adjustments. As a result, the universities in those countries will have equity offices who should ...


0

No, nobody needs to know. Your letter writers need to attest to your academic abilities, whereas your medical history is not something they need to know nor do they have any business telling anyone else about it. As a matter of fact, all that ought to matter are your academic abilities. The fact that you're applying for graduate school implies to me that ...


50

As other people have mentioned, the problem with 16 schools is that a professor cannot, either truthfully or operationally provide customized letters to 16 different schools. By "customization" I mean more than changing the name of the school and program. Good letters of rec use professor's familiarity with their field to speak to applicants' specific ...


33

Tell your professor of your plan to apply to 16 schools, and let them decide if it’s too much. They are capable of making their own decisions without you doing that on their behalf. It’s nice of you to worry about the professor’s well-being, but unnecessary, and counterproductive if it ends up undermining your own success. And as for the professor ...


3

You can ask him, of course. But the problem with asking for too many is that you will get a general letter sent to all, rather than a letter tailored to each given position. I realize this is hard if all schools have similar deadlines, but if possible you should spread it out over time, with your professor's OK. You can also have a different professor ...


3

Use a different referee, time is now not on your side and she did not plan to be sick. If she is not capable of replying to emails she might be very sick so have some respect. You might consider sending her reference late with a note of explanation but I suggest you send the initial application fully complete. Many times the first stage of the sorting ...


1

It depends a lot on your relation with your prof. I'd say something like "I spotted you got the xxx grant - congratulations!" when meeting them on the floor, or add something similar at the end of an email that you would have sent anyway (planning the next meeting, asking for feedback, etc) - don't overthink it.


4

If you feel like congratulating your professor, go ahead and do it. He might appreciate it, or in the worst case he will ignore because he has too many emails in his inbox. But I cannot imagine a scenario where the professor would take such a congratulation email negatively. As with most emails to busy people: keep the email short and to the point. Just one ...


0

You can simply write that you want to pursue your career in research. PhD are made mainly for research. Keep in mind that in Europe it is not possible at all to be enrolled in PhD if you didn't finish your master's degree before (3years bachelor + 2years master + 3/4years PhD in Europe).


-1

Yes, Maître de conférences is equivalent to Associate Professor. There is the equivalent table between all the countries and it is equivalent to Associate/Assistant Professor.


1

For any application, for school or a job, the key thing is to make sure that everything in your application indicates a successful future. In Germany, where a masters is mostly "expected" it might be hard to convince an advisor that you are ready unless you have done some exceptional things otherwise. Having the master's gives the PI a better chance to ...


1

Many US universities have "research professor" positions that have no teaching responsibilities, but I don't know of any such positions that come with tenure.


5

Many university professors have side gigs doing consulting work for industry, writing, starting companies and doing many other things. At all universities I’m familiar with this is permitted and to some extent even encouraged. Usually there will be a policy in place specifying how much outside work is permitted. For example, here is a link to the relevant ...


0

I'll just have to guess that most places will have regulations concerning, or even forbidding, this. But it is a big and variable world. But, at a minimum, a person contemplating doing this needs to check with the university administration, who may permit it or not. Or they might set some boundaries. I doubt that many would permit tutoring students at the ...


3

There is a difference between teaching undergraduate and graduate classes, especially if you are vested in the graduate students you are teaching. There are plenty of R1 schools that have time release based on departmental rules on research activity, meaning if you are heavily active in research they will have you teach less class. There is also the ...


0

First of all, the research suggestion does not reach to be able to contribute to the ​​professional environment. In fact, this condition is not required for your degree in now. And, this isn't searched. However, while will give any suggestion to the environment; you have to especially interpret the same topics by a high-level English and the using technical ...


20

If you give up tenure, you can seek a teaching-free, permanent position at a national laboratory. You have no hope of avoiding all administrative duties. It will always be, at a minimum, necessary to administrate getting someone else to do the administrative duties for you.


30

I’m sorry to disappoint you, but at US R1 universities, a position like the one you imagine doesn’t exist. To have a job with tenure at any salary, you have to teach and do some administrative duties. If you win a Nobel prize or move to France on the other hand, the possibility of you getting a tenured research-only position may become more realistic. See ...


12

You might be able to find such a position, but it would be more likely if you already had an international reputation as a top researcher. Otherwise I think it would be very unlikely. Only the rare opportunity. The reason is that universities also have an obligation to students, from which much of their funding comes. Even US State funded universities (tax ...


3

No, you shouldn't go to see your advisor's father, as per other answers. The western equivalent is the sympathy card sent to your advisor (if you were very close to your advisor and had met the father in person before, you might send one to the father, too). A card with a short, handwritten note expressing your sympathy for the difficult time your advisor ...


2

I must offer a somewhat different answer. I will add that I agree with other answers that it is atypical, but we don’t know your relationship with your advisor or their family. This said, the following is going to assume you haven’t met their father. I disagree that you should absolutely avoid doing this and therefore must present that POV. Depending on ...


18

I agree with other answers. Having said that, if the father does pass away, and if it is in the same town, you may want to go to the memorial service or funeral, as this is a way to show support for the living. Going with a group of students would also be fine.


29

The situation is the same in the EU as it is in the US. You should generally not go visit unless you are close to your supervisor's father personally. If your supervisor has let you know about their father's situation, a reply similar to the one in Geoffrey Brent's answer is a good way to go. If you want to show polite interest, you can after some time ...


109

Unless you have some direct relationship with his father, this is not something we'd normally do in US, UK, or Australian culture. (I'm not sure if it's the same everywhere in the EU.) A polite option might be to tell your advisor something like "I'm very sorry to hear about your father, please let me know if there is anything I can do." If your advisor is ...


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