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It depends on the procedures at a particular institution, but using email as a delivery vehicle for assessed work is so unreliable and untrustworthy that at many places it is prohibited. You should consult your local rules. Email is unreliable because, for the sender there is no guarantee that anything arrived. It could have been blocked by various spam ...


5

Expanding on my comment to make it an answer. Department chairs deal with this all the time, and have to figure out which complaints are legit and which are students complaining as an excuse. I've seen several courses of action. Do nothing. If the student's complaints don't seem reasonable or seem out of character for that instructor, it's a waste of time ...


1

"Talk to the professor first" is the norm in most of the rest of the world, but in many graduate programs in STEM in the US admissions decisions are made by a graduate admissions committee and students are matched to research supervisors (and funding sources) after they've been admitted to the program. It's quite common to have some specialized source of ...


1

This really depends on the University and department. European universities will more often accept PhD students at random times of the year. American ones are more standardized because a PhD student is actually more like a student than an employee and will therefore normally do courses (i.e. a masters as part of a PhD). Since you don't have a masters yet, ...


1

I would be surprised if PhD programs admitted students in the Spring semester. at least as far as I know in the US there is a single application cycle each year. So, as far as i understand it, if you can't pull off an application for Fall 2020 then you're essentially looking at applying for a Fall 2021 start. You'll have to wait for the next yearly cycle. ...


3

This is a classic example of what’s been dubbed the “XY problem.” You have some actual problem to which you’ve decided that emailing this professor is the solution and you’re asking about your solution. But I’m quite confident that getting a professor at another school to read a draft of an essay is not the correct solution to any problem. You should not ...


1

You paint a pretty bad picture. I have no reason to doubt its accuracy. It is common enough to be worrying, but not universal. But, you haven't written any positive aspects - any upside. I suggest you consider whether there is an upside. If not, you would be well-advised to find another advisor or even a different institution. Some advisors can be ...


4

Is it wise to just ignore and do my research independently and forget about her? I mean just considering having no advisor and do my own PhD by myself since she clearly stated that I should define my problem and I think I can solve a problem as long as she leaves me free and give me some time. This is probably the worst thing you could do. In order to ...


1

First of all, you are not alone. Half the reason this forum exists is that getting a Ph.D. is an incredibly challenging endeavor. Funding security, compatibility with your advisor, relevance of the research topic-- all of this plays a big role in whether someone completes a Ph.D. I probably don't have enough experience or might not think it through but ...


2

Should I change my lab/advisor? Yes. All your complaints suggest you have the wrong advisor.


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Yes, faculty do this all the time. They talk about their progress, their attitude towards research, and actively seek advice on how to deal with some situations. This is a positive thing in my opinion, paraphrasing: it takes a village to raise a grad student!


1

Emails with too vague requests are more likely to be ignored. In Germany, admissions to Master programs are usually handled centrally and specific professors do not have influence on your particular application. For doctoral student admissions, it is the opposite: you normally contact the professor directly and they decide whether they want to take you. In ...


1

In Australia, usually PhD students start when they receive their visa. This has no relation to the academic calendar or the student's wishes. Domestic PhD students often start around February. PhD students do not have cohorts in Australia.


1

In the UK, most PhD studentships for home (UK/EU) will be advertised in the autumn, and also those few places that have PhD programms will have closing dates just after Christmas. In most cases this will be to recruit to programs that will start in the autumn of the following year. This is not a hard and fast rule, and plenty of people will get positions ...


2

The TL;DR is that a PIs job security, promotion prospects and grant funding is unfortunately based not on the quality of the research they produce, but on the prestige of the journal they publish it in. To pass probation on my position I needed a publication with Impact factor > 10 within three years of starting. To keep my job I need a so called 4* paper ...


7

Note: as pointed out by Pieter Naaijkens, PRL indeed has a publication fee, making most of the original answer incorrect. I've rewritten the answer as a result. When one pays a publication fee that isn't open access, one is effectively paying the publisher to distribute the paper. Most (subscription) publishers and journals are quite content to distribute ...


1

Can I phrase this another way? If your journal article could be listed on Bing for free, but Google for $1k, would you pay for Google? I think a lot of people would. In general, whether reputation for the journal (Nature is such a great journal!) or the journal is well known (yes, of course I've heard of Science!), readership is important. People pay ...


0

There are some things that the professor should improve and there are other things that you should improve. I think it is a shared responsibility in this situation. There might be some reasons, medical and other, for a certain lack of organization, but it certainly doesn't seem ideal. Even if he is trying to mutate the course into something more modern (...


3

This sounds like the professor has issues going on in his personal life, which happens to all of us from time to time. If possible, you might go to office hours or talk to him after class. Don't address his problems, but instead tell him you are struggling with the presentation and ask for his suggestions on how to do better. Ultimately, that's the goal, ...


2

What this professor does would be illegal under EU GDPR regulations, but of course you did not specify if your University is in EU. It violates EU privacy regulation in so many ways that is impossible to describe, so I will point out just the most obvious: Proportionality criteria. He/she does not need your pictures to enforce rules. He/she is fully ...


1

Professors get two kinds of emails from "prospective" students. The first kind is serious. But the other is just a mass mailing in which it becomes quickly obvious (first sentence or so) that the student has no real interest and no knowledge of the professor or their specific interests and research trajectory. For example, I'm in computer science with very ...


6

As others have pointed out, there are two separate issues here. Answering a technical question incorrectly is really not an issue at all. I seriously doubt that your professor is incompetent -- it is likely that he misspoke or tried to oversimply something. Unless this is a pattern, I wouldn't take any further action. Using a racial slur is a very ...


2

While I don't know anything about computer science (?), if a human answers one question wrong, this is almost never significant enough to raise a complaint, especially if this person changed their answer. Mistakes can happen. If the person turns out to be generally incompentent, you could consider complaining (maybe do some research before if the department ...


6

There are several reasons photographs might be helpful to a professor: To try to learn your names. This is a nice gesture, and you should be thankful that your professor is going to the effort To prevent cheating. The professor can check the photographs of students match the person submitting the exam. This may not be obvious; the professor may recognize ...


6

There are a couple issues here. It might not be allowed by privacy laws, or at least require explicit student consent. Personally I think it’s ok for the instructor to ask but not right to make this mandatory. I strongly feel that it’s wrong to have part of your course evaluation (however small) tied to this; I fail to see the link between the academic ...


2

I agree with you. He should not be allowed to force students to submit their picture. It should be voluntary. Where I live it would legally not be possible to demand this. BUT I certainly understand why he would be asking for these pictures. We had a teacher ask if anyone was fine with him photographing the class, so he could learn everyone's name and ...


18

My mother, who is a teacher, does this. She uses it to build a document with the name and face of each of her students. When you teach several large classes, it's virtually impossible to make the link between the student you see in the classroom and the names in the listings (unless you have a very good memory and are deeply dedicated to remember more than ...


49

I would be interested to know why the professor wants these. I can suggest a completely innocent reason, even a reasonable one. But, I realize there are other possible interpretations. I wonder if you are brave enough to go and ask why. But the innocent reason might be that the prof just needs a crutch to try to learn to match the names and faces of ...


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