New answers tagged

0

You could think of the communication as having three parts: (1) Introduce yourself and your interest. Minimal details about yourself, possibly just your educational background. A sentence or two about your interest in the subject, and how you came across the professor/their work. (2) Convey your work in the area of mutual interest, in a sentence or two. (3) ...


6

It may not be a good idea to send the translations upfront; rather try to email them about your interest and seek their advice on how to proceed. Seek their permission to share your work; don't assume it beforehand. There is a good chance that some of them will appreciate the interest and respond favorably. The extent of their support is entirely upto them, ...


0

If you are seeking entry in a research degree, then pick the researcher. A good reference letter will often complement a transcript, especially if the referee can add to context beyond what the transcript does. In your case the researcher can provide this additional context.


11

Ask someone else. Anyone you ask to write an LOR is free to decide whether or not to do it for any reason of their choosing or even for no reason at all. But if they don't want to do it, somehow pressuring them into doing it anyway is unlikely to result in a really positive letter that's going to be of any help. Asking someone to write an LOR for you is ...


14

Ask him to explain himself, and try to reason with him. His behavior sounds unethical and abusive. It is not for him to decide which country you should live in and get your PhD in. Consider getting one of his colleagues or the department chair to talk to him and advocate for you in a diplomatic way, without applying too much pressure. They may be in a better ...


2

This is fine: it's simple and professional. Your professor is very busy and, while they will appreciate your thanks, they are not going to spend more than a few seconds thinking about the phrasing :-)


4

There’s nothing wrong with thanking your professor for complimenting you. Though I think adding just a bit more will make it more heartfelt.


1

You have 500 words: use them to clearly express the required theme. If you spend more than 500 words, you are only increasing the chances of being less clear and of introducing errors in your essay. Since the professor said he/she is an harsh grader, unless it is a joke about building on steep slopes, you have more to loose from introducing errors in the ...


15

Here's how I could -- fairly easily -- see myself writing the same thing. It's the start of the semester, I've very busy, with lots of department issues and students asking questions as they have difficulty on-boarding to my several classes. One student writes to me about parameters for the first assignment. It seems fairly minor and I quickly write a couple-...


2

I think this would be easier to answer knowing what the other guidelines were. Assuming they are things like "make sure you use good grammar" and "your analysis should be correct," I suspect this person is saying some version of, they expect you to be careful in your work and pay close attention to the details. As a former project manager,...


11

You asked whether you could go over the 500 word limit in the guidelines. Your professor considered it, thought it wasn't a problem, and said yes. However, when rereading the emails your professor realised that your subject heading was 'How strict are guidelines?' They realised that you might get the impression that you can push your luck with the guidelines,...


9

I think he's trying to give you a hint, you can turn in whatever you want, but realize that it should conform to the instructions or it will be marked down. If the assignment was to make an office space utilizing only 500 square feet, then would you ask if you could go over 500 square feet? Instructions were pretty clear, and he may actually be trying to get ...


80

I stand in agreement with Anonymous M's answer. As someone who has worked in architecture offices in the past, I interpret the professor's statements as meaning: "Yes, in this particular instance it is OK to go beyond the 500-word limit, but do not assume you can ignore or circumvent any other guideline without good reason, and without checking with me ...


81

You should stick to the 500 word limit and not waste brain cycles speculating on the somewhat unclear communication you've described. There's a more general lesson here: You were given an assignment apparently with very clear requirements. Following the requirements is going to be faster and pedagogically superior to trying to circumvent them.


6

There are maybe cultural & disciplinary differences, but personally I never expect a student to reply outside of normal working hours (9-5ish), and I also tell my students not to expect a reply from me outside of those hours. It's unclear whether your request was time sensitive (Was there a waiting list for the class? Were other students waiting to hear ...


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