New answers tagged

0

Let me focus on the headline question: Is a professor who's never had to write a grant application disadvantaged in the job market?. I'll leave aside your admirable intention to provide funding. To do their job, a professor needs many skills, but acquiring them takes time and effort. Not all of us are (in my case, were) excellent teachers or even researchers ...


1

No, this is not a concern. Typically individuals who receive endowed professorships already have a long record of applying for grants. You could, as the donor, attempt to negotiate some other situation if you wished. Typically endowed professors only leave their job due to retirement or death. If you have really endowed the professorship with enough money,...


0

At least for another data point: at this time in my life, while I might be willing to give people the TeX source-code [sic] for documents, I would strongly hesitate to get embroiled in co-authorship with students, for several reasons. It's not exactly that I'd "mistrust" students, but that I'd feel the necessity of ultra-scrupulously editing... and ...


2

Go ahead and ask. It is extremely uncommon. In many years of teaching I have never had a student ask this. But I wish they would! If by chance I see that a student has very nice notes, I sometimes ask if they have any interest in helping to produce improved class notes for the class. But so far, they have never been interested. Often, they simply refuse ...


2

No, it's not common The professor may think this notes as a finished product, as in it's not intended to be edited in an integrated process. How not to be over-flattering Show, not tell. Write a email thanking for the lectures and volunteer to help with the notes; Attach a small sample of your suggestions as notes placed over the PDF, or in the body of ...


0

One concern I see in this is matters of impartiality and confidentiality. Assuming by "course I finished" you mean you already got graded for this course, then this isn't as much of an issue. However, if you haven't yet been graded, someone could reasonably claim that your interaction with the professor in this way was an attempt at influencing ...


7

Show the value of your proposal Drop a mail on these lines (omitted salutations and format that is likely to be region specific). Your notes were helpful for me but I did notice that they could be enriched by additional material and minor formatting improvements, for example as in the attachment. I felt these changes would benefit future students. I would ...


68

No, in my experience this is not common. But that shouldn't stop you from asking. Your suggestion is certainly within the reasonable parameters in which simply offering your help wouldn't be offensive. (Provided of course you do so tactfully, i.e. following the usual etiquette when pointing out that someone else's work could be improved upon.) I have friends ...


10

There are two parties involved in this, you and your professor. Let us think from both your perspectives. You wish to help your professor and also want to ensure that the notes are of the best possible quality ( you think they are not currently). Your professor depending on his objective and personality may like this idea or frown upon it. If the lecture ...


2

So he says he's interested but acts like he's not? Then you are probably not very high on his priority list. You could e-mail him again after a week or two, but it probably won't get a different outcome. I'd suggest you move on.


2

A PhD is a PhD... it doesn't matter how long it takes, or whether it is full or part-time, the qualification itself is unaffected. Amount of research produced over a certain duration has got some importance though. The crucial question is the reason for the PhD being part-time. If that reason would reflect badly on your perceived fit as an academic, then it ...


4

Yes, you can do that, but it won't mean a tremendous amount in any evaluation. But probably better to list it than not. And the section you suggest is the correct place for it. It is immaterial whether you have published there or not, assuming, only, that the journal is reputable.


2

This is really up to you. I would start with making a table listing all the advantages and disadvantages of each position. By the way you formulated that question, you already started that table However, when making that table remember that the 3 and 4 years of funding do not correspond with how long it takes to finish a PhD; it only corresponds to how long ...


3

In this sort of impossible situation in life in general, it is generally best not to focus on blame or complaint about someone else's behaviour. Instead (preferably in consultation with a neutral advisor) formulate what you think is the best way forward. In other words, you need to find the solution. The reason is that no-one (at whatever level) like to be ...


1

Speak to your department and explain the situation. Many faculties have directors of studies whose job it is to deal with issues such as this. If you are concerned about irking your examiner(s), you can also mention this to the department and ask for appropriate discretion. They should be able to advise you best and clear this up sooner rather than later, ...


0

I see a lot of answers supporting dropping salutations once a particular email chain gets going. But I also don't use them with anybody who I interact with a lot. This includes family members and friends, but also my boss and close colleagues. When I was a grad student it included my advisor and professors that I was in a small class with. But when I email ...


1

Is it fine to exclude an email salutation for short messages? In academia or not, a good reason to avoid short e-mails is to help the receiver know the beginning of a chain is legitimate. Consider, Professor Newton, I'm having trouble with today's assignment [link to a "picture"]. This is does not provide the recipient enough info and has the ...


2

Just ask your advisor in a very straightforward way if you should take it. E.g. "XYZ company asked me to do an internship with them, do you think I should take it or not". If he/she says yes then take it, and if not then don't. If you have any concerns that your advisor might get upset at even being asked the question, then ask another student in ...


0

To add a partial answer, not covered by the other answers: remember that an email thread doesn't perfectly emulate a face-to-face conversation, as other people can be added to the thread later on and may see the whole history. So if you think it would be very improper for you to be informal, even if whoever you are talking to does not seem to mind (unless ...


0

(I'm in the US - I lived in Canada way back when I was first a grad student) I don't inhabit the academy, but I did a graduate degree 5 years ago, and I did graduate work a long time ago (way before the advent of email). I don't think I've ever used "Dear" in an email - ever, and I don't think I ever addressed anything to my research supervisor in ...


4

Yes, it is ok to write again. Say you hope she is still interested and hope you can discuss the project soon. You could even suggest one or two days that it would be convenient for you and ask for alternatives. If you have applied, say so. A week isn't a long time for academics, but it is long enough that a follow up won't be insulting. I wouldn't even ...


77

Given the reluctance of anyone else to communicate with Prof A, it seems less a case of you not knowing the secret handshake to get in touch with him, but more a case of Prof A simply not communicating. It is unlikely that anyone (including the dean) can make him communicate in a reasonable way. What you need to do is to make sure that the path-of-least-...


11

If prof. A is indeed as 'odd' to communicate with as you indicate, the problem will be known by the rest of the faculty, probably including the dean. If you want to move forward, you need to escalate. But if you do it in a respectful manner - keeping the focus on your need to move forward, and not on the oddities by prof. A - you can probably manage to do it ...


2

The professor most likely has a secretary taking care of administration. Visit and talk to them, it is likely that they are aware of these difficulties. If you explain your situation and politely ask for help chances are that they will help you communicating with the Prof. to get what you need.


10

I usually find it's good to start and end formally, but for little in-between messages that are around one line and easy to answer it's fine to be informal. Unless the person is really arrogant, they won't find it disrespectful if you do this (especially if they've done it first), although it depends a bit on your relationship to them. Maybe something like ...


1

Yes, with some exceptions, especially cultural. Writing salutations wastes time, they take up unnecessary screen real estate, and reading them wastes time too. But, some people and cultures expect them, so take a little care.


45

An important thing to note here is that often these dropped headers don't happen because the email is merely short, but usually because the email chain starts to approximate a conversation, i.e. a quick succession of short replies. So the formalities shift from those of writing letters to those of talking in person. So maybe take some cues from there. In ...


7

No, it is not ethical. Yes, it is common. Particularly for countries that have requirements on absolute number of papers to be published by grad students prior to graduation, this is a relatively common practice. Many journals now ask for the authors to explicitly list what was each author's contribution to the article, but of course this is also quite ...


-3

This is known as padding and is not ethical. Will you take a stand? Well, will that affect your supervisor / student relationship? Your degree completion? That is probably why this practice happens and will continue to happen. You have to decide if you will talk to your supervisor, if that fails then the department head, then the head of research or even ...


20

In my experience, it should be fine to drop the salutation given that the other person has done so before you in that same chain. But if in doubt then err on the more formal side. It's always a good idea to emulate the email style of the other person in a one-on-one chain (unless you have some reason for wanting to maintain formality).


1

In addition to the other answers: Being a referee might also help in obtaining a visa. Some countries offer visas for people with special abilities (in the US e.g. the O-1 visa). This includes scientists. Getting a letter of recommendation from a journal editor where one has performed a few reviews might be of great help in proving this specialist status. In ...


2

For Australia, both the supervisor and the university might reject a PhD student. Universities may often reject PhD students for inadequate language ability even if the supervisor wants the student. These decisions are based on a threshold, not based on who else applies. Some supervisors have funding they can use to pay PhD students at their discretion, ...


1

It's also good because it allows you to develop reputation and rapport with the editors, who are usually "high up" in your research community. There's a good chance they have some influence over conferences, funding, etc. And of course if you submit a paper to their journal, they will be more likely to take you seriously if they know you've ...


11

As mentioned in the other answer, reviewing is an important service to the community. However, you will also profit yourself from reviewing: You will learn about a new topic. You will learn about how a review process works. You get to see the other side, which will most likely helpful for your own future paper writing: Since you know how reviewing a paper ...


5

Yes, you can. Service to the community is an important part of an academic CV. Be careful, though, to associate your own name only with reputable journals, otherwise it may hurt instead of help.


1

For the sake of efficiency and fairness, candidate selection is a purely administrative process, based on submitted paperwork only, and handled by academic staff that adhere to strict rules and work ethics. You should not disturb them, nor should you hope for any good effect of doing so. If you want to enhance your chances, then apply in parallel to other ...


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