New answers tagged

3

There's the "legal ownership" element, but given the situation you've described, I'd attach even more importance to the moral/ethical element: Who is most likely to use these books? I suspect if your department is being shut down, no one will care about the legal ownership specifics unless you provoke them to. So you could consider triaging: ...


2

First, figure out which books you want to keep at all. Then ask the responsible person what you should do with the books you don't want to keep. That answer may reveal the answer to your actual question in your particular case. I think the convention is that books bought by the university remain unless given to you, which a dean or VP might do. Those you ...


0

I find it highly upsetting and uncomfortable if a student introduces themselves with their personal problem. This happens all the time around the end of a semester. In a class of about 200 students, I get dozens of emails that open with the details of a personal tragedy and then tell me they need an extension. It's not that I think students are lying (I ...


3

I would say email is better, for three reasons. The first is that email is the preferred, standard way of contacting someone in academia, no matter who you are. Now with covid- everything is through email. The second is that I do not know of many professors keep track of their Linked-In profile. And if they get a message on Linked-In, they will get a ...


1

Update your professor about why progress has not been made and what your next steps are. If you need more time to focus on your mental health, then let your professor know. One other important thing we should make clear: you are doing this work on your own time, as opposed to being paid. Research mentors or professors with unpaid research assistants should ...


0

what should I do now? You should contact your professor and let them know what happened. How should I talk this out to my professor? Would an apology be enough? Should I ask him if I am still allowed to work on that project? You should just tell them what happened, why you were absent, and that you would like to continue working on the project. While ...


-1

As was alluded to in the comments, this really depends. I'm speaking from the perspective of computer science, which on average has a better job market than other disciplines. If you're talking about a research fellowship in very small fields (say, abstract math), you'll probably need to reconsider everything written below. Successful research fellowships ...


-1

There is nothing that you can do. There are more students than there are qualified instructors. A University cannot fire an instructor unless they can find a better replacement. As of the year 2015, roughly 1 in 3 Americans get baccalaureate degrees. Not so many Americans used go to college. Not only do 1 in 3 Americans get bachelor degrees, but the ...


0

In my opinion, lecture is not the proper vehicle for providing direct answers or application of formulae – the kinds of things that you'd find in the textbook, and thus a "regurgitation"; rather, this would best be achieved at some recitation or office hours with TAs (who are often extremely helpful in helping students understand course content!). ...


2

A perspective of an ex-student, then ex-lecturer and now a parent. I usually taught math/physics the way I ended up understanding it. I was not a particularly brilliant student so I had to think a lot when learning, trying to keep everything more or less in a coherent state. This meant simplifications, analogies - and then understanding why the ...


3

I know it sounds confrontional, but did you ever consider the notion that this class might be too advanced for you? Not everybody is able to deal with a grad course, nor should everyone be. The fact that you already struggled to deal with the undergrad courses and could only cope by extensive preparation and a very predictable class, might be a good sign ...


10

The typical professor will possess many bits of insight into their field that cannot be found in any textbook. So you are simply asking for the wrong thing. Asking for a professor who teaches only what’s in the textbook makes sense if your goal is to feel like you’ve mastered the topic of the course. If your goal is to actually master the topic at a level a ...


2

Depending on the technology available in your classroom, a couple of resources that might be available are video recordings of the lecture (so you can go back over the lecture later to make sense of things that weren't immediately clear) or screen capture recordings of things that the lecturer wrote on a stylus and projected on a screen during the lecture (...


14

Your problem isn't that the professor doesn't follow the text. Your real problem (as clarified in your edit) is an unusual aspect of your question that nobody has addressed. It is your need to "prepare for class" on your own. In all the courses I can recall, the professor either assigns a specific reading before class, or not. Then the professor ...


9

I certainly grant in advance that tastes vary... Based on my own student days' attendance in various lectures, and on my own preferences for teaching, I try to think in terms of "added value" that my lectures/classes may provide, beyond any text. Yes, I do also try to provide my own notes that fill in details that might be tedious to discuss "...


22

I'd like to offer my perspective as a second year mathematics graduate student. I have found that the courses I learnt the most from were those in which the instructor did not follow the prescribed textbook(s) very closely. In such courses, the instructor would usually spend a large portion of the lecture hours drawing connections and nudging our intuition ...


5

I'll guess that this is fairly common, actually. Some things you can do: Ask a lot of questions during lecture if possible. In a class of 20 or so, it is possible. In particular, ask at the very end of a lecture what will be the topic of the next lecture. This might give you a heads up to look in the text book. But, and this is actually independent of the ...


39

I am a retired lecturer, so here is my perspective. As an undergrad, you were part of a sausage machine, taking kids from school and running them through a training process where the competent ones could earn a Degree that said they were competent to ply a given "trade". Grad School is different. In many Unis it is a lead in to research, or if it's ...


1

This is unlikely to be a formal term anywhere, but a person who does what professors normally do (research, teaching, ...) but without a formal position/job/salary, might well describe themself as a pseudo professor. Without a formal relationship to a university, they are probably less bound by university regulations, except, perhaps in treatment of students,...


9

If the problem is a lack of repetition of the material, because your lecturers are not repeating the contents of a book verbatim, then you could consider repeating the material by yourself before attending the lecture. Also consider different ways of learning the material; doing exercises, playing around with examples, and playing around with the conditions ...


110

If your undergraduate lectures were perfectly predictable, following the book exactly, and you showed up perfectly prepared to each one, then they were actually completely useless. You could have just stayed home and read the book yourself! At the graduate level, the best practice is to ask the professor for good references, both at the start of the course, ...


1

Understand the motivation for the paper, how it contributes to its particular research community, and note any clever twists or innovations it introduced.


2

If you want to prove that you read a paper, you should read it carefully by analyzing the main results and identify the contribution. You should also understand why a hypothesis is made and whether if it is optimal or not. Sometimes you might find some errors or improve some results. In this way, you can prove that you truly read a research paper.


11

Well, for starters, Musk is just trolling. I think he does that often enough that people should recognize it for what it is. The statement has a bit of truth and if you exaggerate it enough you get to his statement. A more accurate portrayal is that most academic publications have a very small audience. Not all, but most. The audience is other specialists in ...


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