New answers tagged

2

I have a couple of observations from personal experience. As a grad student, I audited a course in functional analysis. We had a required text for the course. Each day, the professor came into class, opened the book to the appropriate place and started lecturing. In another course, which I actually took, the text was a well-known text on complex projective ...


3

This poem was an enjoyable read. I think it certainly does hold some relevance for computer scientists and academia as a whole. In the translation available here, the poem reads Too bad that, cut out as you are for grand and noble acts, this unfair fate of yours never offers encouragement, always denies you success; that cheap habits get in your way, ...


6

In Germany this is very common in the undergraduate lectures. Usually we were able to go to the library after the first few lectures, look up all the popular books on the subject and find the one that the lecturer was following. You could then sit with it in the lecture and always predict what was said next. Some lecturers told us which books they were ...


3

First, don't assume that the concerns about one person are necessarily the same as concerns about another. It may just be coincidence. Second, the history is what it is. If there is some "evidence" that you did something wrong you will just have to explain it as best you can and live with the consequences. It may well be that the monitoring system ...


-3

This is up to you, I went to a university which had saturday attendence requirements, so one would have to apply for official leave. Probably this is not the case where you are, but I agree if everybody works on Saturdays, it is not good not to come. Personally I would talk to the supervisor tell him you want to see the games and if it is ok to come in on ...


15

Don't. That is, don't ask for time off to attend games--moreover, don't ask for time off on Saturday. Why? Because it's not a work day and your advisor isn't your mom. Would it be reasonable to ask my advisor for Saturdays off, so that I can participate in our school's football tradition? No, because as Dan Romik said, you don't ask for what's rightfully ...


11

While there are a number of issues with this teaching style, there is no plagiarism because there is no expectation of originality in teaching. He could teach better, probably, but it's not like you can report him for plagiarizing his lecture notes.


20

Having worked at Penn State I can assure you that no one in their right mind will be anywhere near downtown on game days. The majority of our graduate students went to at least some of the home games and I don't know of anyone who questioned their commitment. Update Just to clarify for anyone unfamiliar with "big" football schools - on home game ...


62

It’s a tricky situation and you will want to filter any advice given here (including mine offered below) through your own understanding of the details of the situation and the personalities involved. That being said, my tentative guess as to the best strategy for handling it is to do two things: Don’t mention to your advisor your football game attendance ...


27

Often enough in these kinds of interactions, the situation feels much more dire than it really is because you're not in touch with the professor. You are left to your own devices, building scenarios of how much this professor must hate you now and how terrible it is that you left. You're fine. Knot theory is knot for everyone (ha ha!), a fact your professor ...


1

It depends on your university, its professors and the institute policies. There is significant research happening in universities, but in India, it's most prevalent in the top-ranked institutes/universities, which are mostly government institutes. Can you get involved in initial years? Yes and no. It's difficult to answer without knowing if your uni is ...


0

Yes, it is appropriate in the U.S. to buy and attach a gift to a hand-written note thanking the student. I am aware of this happening in the United States, and it was much appreciated by the student. In fact, the gift was a University hoodie and some University-branded coffee mugs, and although the student has long since left the United States, they still ...


-2

tl;dr: Back pay for overtime work. My student just graduated, and he really is an exquisite person, he worked more than he probably should have (extra hours, weekends) without me asking What you're describing is the common situation in US academia where Ph.D. candidates - junior researchers - work more than a full-time position without any overtime pay. In ...


4

One of the problems with gifts is that one does not want have liability of insinuation. Giving my Japanese students a gift, which has a cultural weight of something in return, is very different from giving one to an American student. There is not a clear answer to this question. Having said that, I've settled on giving my students the books that they used ...


1

Yes, a gift should be ok and I think that the gift should be tailor made for the recipient. I think it would be hard for any of us to say what kind of gift to get your student. That being said, does your student like wine? Do they prefer a specific brand, vintage, or type (e.g., Cab, Merlot, Pinot, etc.)? Are they open to trying a wine from your country? ...


0

There can be confusion over academic standards between the US and Europe. If this is the case, you can send to your prospective advisor, samples of the exam papers you have taken. It is not possible to say whether this might have any effect, but think about it. I am quoting advice given to my son by his British advisor before applying, successfully, to MIT.


7

A bottle of wine is an excellent gift. You can pick up a decent wine for 30 dollars and attach a nice hand written note to it. Of course you also tell a short story about the wine when making the gift, I myself e.g. picked up a box of very expensive wine in Italy once. I gifted a bottle on two very special occasions. Regardless of what the more nerdy SE ...


1

As others have also pointed out, I don't see a problem with it unless there is a policy at your university, however, many ideas are very subjective, as for example if he doesn't use pens that much, he might not use this one at all, and actually make him feel guilty, or, if he doesn't like physical books, etc...


17

Honestly I don't have any valid reason, I did not pay attention earlier to my academic studies. But I think I can't mention that. What can be some possible reasons that I can tell him? On the contrary, if you think that was the cause, then that's exactly what you should say. Prospective supervisors are interested in a lot of aspects of candidates, and ...


0

That part of the interview is not a test. You simply ask the questions that you want to know the answers to, not that somebody on this site told you to ask.


30

Many U.S. schools (especially state ones) actually have written policies on gifts. Look for it on your school's intranet, or ask HR if you can't find it. They vary: I know at least one state school where any gifts, even a cup of coffee from a professor to a former student, are forbidden. Some schools have a cap on monetary value, like $100. You're unlikely ...


55

I don't see any problem with this. Something from your own country would be appropriate, as would a book that is important in your field. Even a tourist souvenir from your country as something to remember you. But not too expensive or elaborate.


15

Providing that you have done better recently, then the reasons you give here are fine. "I didn't pay attention early in my studies." People look for growth, not just excellence overall. In fact, that growth can be a strength. Just be honest, both about the past and more recent things. And focus on the ways you are prepared to move forward. Honesty ...


3

At most universities, outreach is not part of the formal hiring criteria. Even when it is part of the criteria, it is not one of the important criteria. However, you might be asked during a job interview, "How do you engage with the community?" or "How will you participate in recruiting students?" You should have outreach experience ...


6

Pertinent to academia, I think of outreach as activities that bring academic subject matter and/or expertise to a community audience, often an audience that is under-served. Activities might include lectures or presentations to community audiences presented in laymen’s terms about subjects that are esoteric but interesting; interacting with elementary ...


-1

Your application should present the clearest possible brief picture of who you are and why you are a fit for the job you seek. Some schools will value a professor's interest in connecting to a larger community than their professional specialty, both for new hires and for promotion. I suspect few would think it negative. Your question suggests that outreach ...


1

I would suggest that you be as open and honest with your current supervisor as you can. No surprises, no evasion. Tell him your list of schools. Tell him you want to aim as high as you possibly can. From your current A+ school, possibly to an A++ school. I have known some students in your position. A student who excels under a professor makes the prof look ...


8

Yes, this is both flattering and weird. I would call it unprofessional and tacky. He should have thanked you for the nice answer and asked your permission to post parts of it. Whether you should have public credit for that work may depend on policies at your school and on how you and the instructor think about the impact of such an announcement on other ...


0

"Am I overthinking it, or is it really unacceptable?" I believe you need an actual assessment here than a theoretical one. Theoretically yes i believe it is not alright without your prior consent to this communication method. The actual assessment is a different approach. It is based on the result of this communication method. Does it actually ...


0

Change advisors. Some highly successful professors (highly published/cited) are both terrible bosses and terrible human beings. Remember, while you may be treated like an employee, you aren't--you are an apprentice, and a minion. Expect abuse. TA/RA positions are funded so professors can dump some of their workload onto graduate students, and actually keep ...


2

The title of the question asks one thing, then the body asks a completely different thing. How should I request a professor to restrict communication to email? Send an email, and say, "Thanks for texting me about my answer to #7 on last week's problem set. It was helpful to get more explanation about why I can't infer whichness of foo based on ...


8

There are two major considerations that I'm kind of surprised aren't being mentioned by most of the other answers: You didn't give your consent to be contacted that way. You are uncomfortable with it. Personally, I do think it's inappropriate to use someone's private IM/social media accounts for work/university purposes without consent. Since the messages ...


4

My instructor for an undergraduate math course (a professor) has been interacting with me over an instant-messaging service The word I notice here is "me". If the prof contacts everyone this way then there is less to be worried about. If they contact just you then it's a concern. EDIT If this is directed at you alone, and you have all the ...


33

I'm going to go a bit against the stream here, and say yes, this is unprofessional behaviour, given the circumstances a) that this is a professor teaching an undergraduate course, where there are surely more official channels available, and b) it was the professor and not you who initiated this communication. There are two main reasons for me to say that ...


34

Are you overthinking this? Perhaps. As the range of answers suggests, customs with regard to instant messaging are currently changing. E-Mail is still the main channel for professional communication, unless you are working closely together. But IM is catching up in this setting as well. As customs don't offer clear guidance, what really matters is your ...


36

I don't think there is anything especially unprofessional about communicating via instant messaging. Email is a naturally asynchronous communication platform, and sometimes you need a synchronous method to contact people. In my research group, we use a specific professional instant messaging application - Slack. I did this because I feel it's important to ...


0

If you use IMing only personally, you can discourage this behavior by being more responsive to email and less responsive to IM. You can say something like, "for something urgent, send me an email! Sometimes I snooze my IM alerts during the day to focus on work, but I check my email regularly." Then don't answer IMs during the day as frequently. ...


0

I cannot see your specific concern here since you mentioned there is nothing inappropriate from their side in your chats. I guess You are thinking that the mere fact of using messenger apps violates your boundaries as it is naturally unprofessional. Based on my experience, not all professors think the same way although the ones who tend to message you on the ...


0

Instant messaging is not inherently more unprofessional than other common forms of communication. It could be used in exactly the same way as email. Instant messaging has been getting more popular in workplaces. Specific messages could be unprofessional, but they would also be unprofessional if sent by email. If you prefer to receive email, you can ask to ...


0

In your specific case, I would rank them 1, 3, 2, 4, with 4 not actually being a real option if you can avoid it. My reasoning is that a truly good letter from an individual familiar with your work will always outweigh a mediocre letter from someone who doesn't. Given that, it then becomes more important who exactly is writing the letter. A letter from a ...


2

Yes, you can ask and will probably be successful at it. You want people who know you well enough to give an honest (and positive) assessment of the likelihood of your success in graduate work, and possibly research, depending on the degree. Think though about getting letters from a fairly wide range of people if that is possible. But in your case, suggesting ...


-2

I would consider the possibility that your professor phrased the rules more strict than they intented to. That is the 3 hours are a recommendation and they would not consider it cheating if students where to take much longer. It is also possible that the professor just didn't think about this too much beforehand and if you point out the mess they will just ...


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