If you need help with online teaching or other challenges in academia arising from the COVID-19 crisis, we have prepared this FAQ to get you started.

New answers tagged

-1

You could be next victim of plagiaristic group, same as Grigory Perelman. I don't think you should ask for anything. Carefully compare papers and possibly they could be a plagiaristic "predator authors group", they search for preprints which were not yet officially published and kill their publications by publishing first same material. Grigory Perelman was ...


5

I think you can be straightforward with highlighting your work - I tend to send emails about related works to authors of new preprints on arxiv (most of the time it is not my personal work I suggest to have a look at, but other people's work). It is a bit embarrassing to forget to cite a highly relevant paper, so I usually appreciate this type of ...


0

I don't agree with the other answers. First, one citation is not worth much. The main reason not to ask for citations is that it isn't worth the effort. To get value out of citations as a PhD student, you need hundreds. Later in your career, you need thousands. If you send out targeted emails requesting citations, you would have to send tens of ...


45

Emailing them could be acceptable -- and I would even say it should be encouraged! -- but you have to tread very carefully. If you write an email like Hey Dr. Jones, I saw your newest paper on arXiv and I noticed you didn't cite [Wouter et al, 2020], do you think you can post an update and cite me? Wouter this would come across very poorly, and ...


26

I would think that a direct request like that isn't likely to be well received. It is a kind of trolling (in the older sense of the word: Trolling for complements, Trolling for citations). But if you want to send the paper and point out that "you may find it relevant to your own work", then it has a completely different tone to it. And introducing ...


6

medRxiv: a preprint server for health sciences. https://www.medrxiv.org/


3

Well, statistically speaking, ArXiv requires no reader subscription, so more people have access to it (regardless of what publications they or their institute pays for). Ergo publications on ArXiv have the potential receive views from a wider audience. Whether this translates to citations or not is another argument. It’s relatively common in my field to see ...


2

People actively follow arXiv. They subscribe to the RSS feeds, mailing lists, Twitter bots, etc. that inform them about recent relevant preprints that appear on arXiv. Google Scholar finds new papers on arXiv quickly, and this way the authors will get quick notifications when something that cites their work appears on arXiv. ArXiv papers are also indexed in ...


Top 50 recent answers are included