If you need help with online teaching or other challenges in academia arising from the COVID-19 crisis, we have prepared this FAQ to get you started.

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84

Print it locally. Hopefully, your conference is in a city of some non-negligible size and not in the middle of nowhere. Find a copy shop in the city and print your poster there. Large conferences may even have their own on-site printing, although a last-minute print job may be expensive or even unavailable. Some people do this in any case, so that they ...


64

I've seen this before and it can work very well. Your only task in the one minute slot is to convince people that they should come and see your poster. Say what you've been doing and why it's interesting. You could use your abstract as a starting point but don't just read it out. Keep the slide really simple with the paper title and authors and a single, ...


57

I'm answering from an HCI-related subfield of CS: What you describe - attendees print and bring their posters themselves - is completely normal. While I do not rule out it exists even in my specific field, I have never encountered a conference that would print posters for you. Any time I have participated in, or just looked at the CfP for a poster session, ...


54

I would recommend Inkscape: vector graphics powerful free intuitive cross platform


48

There are a couple solutions to the "transporting a poster tube on a plane" problem: Most flights allow a second piece of hand-luggage, so that bit is fine. And while it is larger in the length dimension than is usually allowed, I've never had this be a problem. In not-very-full flights, it can be stored on top or behind other bags. On fuller flights, I ...


48

Usually, in these "madness" sessions (that's what they're usually called on the conferences I'm familiar with), the one minute is more of an upper limit rather than a rough guideline. As such, your abstract may already be too long. The main purpose of the one-minute-presentation is to serve as an appetizer for people to come and see your poster. Thus, while ...


46

You should present the best poster you can make It is far easier to make a professionally looking, high quality poster using LaTeX or any other software than by hand-drawing it. However, there are some really good artists out there who can manage to do a hand-drawn poster that looks better than a printed one could. So don't use hand-drawing as a way to ...


46

The logos on your poster should indicate the author's affiliation. Use the logo of the presenting author's university. Never use the organizer, sponsor, or host logo unless you work for them. People attending the conference already know what conference they are at. This information is not needed on a poster.


43

It depends on the venue. In a small room, you can easily wander around and get back to your poster quickly if you spot someone interested. In a huge conference hall, if you abandon your poster you may never know who visited it and when. So, if you have a large venue, ask yourself, what is your priority: to get your work out and have a chance of presenting ...


41

Usually if you are presenting a poster, it's because you submit a poster abstract to a call for posters, and it is accepted, or submit a paper, and you are informed that it is accepted for a poster presentation instead of a talk, or are otherwise informed by the organizers to bring a poster. If you don't fall in any of the categories above, then in my ...


39

I haven't written a poster yet, but if you're a Latex savvy, there are plenty of packages that allow you to design posters. See related questions: "How to create posters using LaTeX" "What can you tell me about poster design and typography in LaTeX?" "Conference Announcement Poster"


34

Bring some post-its and a pen. Stay at your poster for half an hour. If you have people to talk to, continue talking to those people. If time frees itself up, write on a postit that you will be browsing other posters for half an hour, and you will be back for discussion at X o'clock. Other interested people can still look at your poster, and return at that ...


30

A prize is typically given for both content and presentation of a work, so a typical fair way to handle prize money, whether for poster or paper, is to offer to split it evenly amongst all of the co-authors. Co-authors who feel they have not offered a full share of work might choose to decline their share, but the basic assumption should be an even split. ...


29

A poster session is a good way to disseminate your work: but it has nothing to do with how you get credit for your work. Some computer science venues have moved to a model where papers are reviewed and accepted, but the vast majority of papers only get a poster presentation at the conference. Another model is where all accepted papers are invited to a ...


29

The primary issues with using Wikipedia for academic research are that it's a tertiary source, and there's no credibility/quality assurance. So, you should make sure that If the image contains intellectual content that requires citation, you should cite a primary source for that content. The image (including its factual/intellectual content) meets ...


29

I would recommend another option: present the current truth of your work and results. You can get feedback on the methods and approach and somebody may even be able to point out adjustments to your approach that may help the work. Even just talking to people outside of your lab can be an important part of developing as a researcher. Don't try to hide the ...


28

Several reasons. Conflicts of Interest. If you're doing climate change research that's funded by The Society of People Who Think Global Warming is Poppycock, you need to mention this. Organizations with a clear interest in a specific outcome are much more likely to produce research that affirms their desired outcome than they do those that refute it, ...


27

A conference, or workshop where the posters are printed for you is very exceptional. It sounds reasonable to print all posters for the presenters locally but you can print posters much cheaper at university than in any copy shop, because its subsidized some prefer a cheap preprint, others are willing to pay for the nice glossy high quality print. the ...


26

It depends on what you want to do. If you feel like at this point in your research it would be more beneficial to converse than to present, then I'd say that a poster session is the right venue for you. It's true that talks are considered a bit more prestigious than poster sessions, but you really should go with what you think will be more valuable for you, ...


24

The title is your bait, the first paragraph is your hook. Make the bait big and tasty, make the first paragraph catchy. A poster is primarily an advert for you. Secondarily, it's an advert for your research. Thirdly, it's an advert for your department. And it will succeed at those things best, if it gives the casual reader an easily accessible introduction ...


24

Powerpoint. There are hundreds of PowerPoint poster templates available online, many of them are good, and it is one of the standard formats people accept — and can be exported to PDF for easy post-conference distribution.


24

In general there are a number of different distinct workflows that lead to a poster. Each workflow has a number of software implementations. Word Processor (Word, Pages, OpenOffice Writer) Presentation Software (e.g., PowerPoint, Keynote, Impress) Vector Graphics (e.g., Illustrator, Inkscape, OpenOffice Draw) Desktop Publishing (e.g. Publisher, In Design) ...


22

It might be better if things change in the direction of making "posters" and "poster sessions" have greater weight, but, at the moment, in "research" mathematics, I fear this is not so. (This does not deny that undergrad "research" is typically showcased in exactly this way.) The questioner's potentially-cynical-sounding quoted "market analysis" is I think ...


21

If both institutions have supported your project, you should acknowledge both in your poster. To save space, you have a variety of options: Make the logos smaller by scaling them. If available, use a small, square version of the logo rather than a larger rectangular version. Put the logos in a part of the poster that is underutilized. (For example, left-...


21

I don't think you actually need a reason to decline. Saving the work for submission elsewhere is perfectly reasonable in any case. All you need to reply is "No, thank you". Posters are good for preliminary work and for students wanting some exposure and an opportunity to meet other researchers, of course. But the work is yours and you don't need to ...


19

There are two levels of issues that you may have to cope with. First, let's look at what to do at the conference: You already suggested some options: just talk about my work This might serve as a last resort fallback, but it probably does not leave too good an impression. Maybe more importantly, talking about your work might be more difficult ...


19

It is what it is, at least as far as the official program is concerned -- tell the missing author about it and apologize. What's more important in practice is that all authors are listed on the actual poster you will be presenting. That's what people really see and will notice, so make sure it is complete.


18

I want to add an additional tool that I always use: Adobe InDesign


18

Someone should probably stay by your poster throughout. If there is no one there it won't generate much of any interest. Posters are seldom so self explanatory that people will gain much without a bit of help. Perhaps a colleague or even your professor would be willing to help you out for a portion of the time required. But it should be someone who can ...


17

My personal experience (atmospheric science / remote sensing) is that poster sessions have little significance. You can present your work, maybe you will have some interesting discussions with scientists or get interesting ideas from others. In my field, posters are not peer-reviewed and virtually always accepted, if not clearly off-topic or rejected for ...


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