Hot answers tagged

84

Print it locally. Hopefully, your conference is in a city of some non-negligible size and not in the middle of nowhere. Find a copy shop in the city and print your poster there. Large conferences may even have their own on-site printing, although a last-minute print job may be expensive or even unavailable. Some people do this in any case, so that they ...


64

I've seen this before and it can work very well. Your only task in the one minute slot is to convince people that they should come and see your poster. Say what you've been doing and why it's interesting. You could use your abstract as a starting point but don't just read it out. Keep the slide really simple with the paper title and authors and a single, ...


57

I'm answering from an HCI-related subfield of CS: What you describe - attendees print and bring their posters themselves - is completely normal. While I do not rule out it exists even in my specific field, I have never encountered a conference that would print posters for you. Any time I have participated in, or just looked at the CfP for a poster session, ...


48

Usually, in these "madness" sessions (that's what they're usually called on the conferences I'm familiar with), the one minute is more of an upper limit rather than a rough guideline. As such, your abstract may already be too long. The main purpose of the one-minute-presentation is to serve as an appetizer for people to come and see your poster. Thus, while ...


46

You should present the best poster you can make It is far easier to make a professionally looking, high quality poster using LaTeX or any other software than by hand-drawing it. However, there are some really good artists out there who can manage to do a hand-drawn poster that looks better than a printed one could. So don't use hand-drawing as a way to ...


46

The logos on your poster should indicate the author's affiliation. Use the logo of the presenting author's university. Never use the organizer, sponsor, or host logo unless you work for them. People attending the conference already know what conference they are at. This information is not needed on a poster.


43

It depends on the venue. In a small room, you can easily wander around and get back to your poster quickly if you spot someone interested. In a huge conference hall, if you abandon your poster you may never know who visited it and when. So, if you have a large venue, ask yourself, what is your priority: to get your work out and have a chance of presenting ...


41

Usually if you are presenting a poster, it's because you submit a poster abstract to a call for posters, and it is accepted, or submit a paper, and you are informed that it is accepted for a poster presentation instead of a talk, or are otherwise informed by the organizers to bring a poster. If you don't fall in any of the categories above, then in my ...


34

Bring some post-its and a pen. Stay at your poster for half an hour. If you have people to talk to, continue talking to those people. If time frees itself up, write on a postit that you will be browsing other posters for half an hour, and you will be back for discussion at X o'clock. Other interested people can still look at your poster, and return at that ...


30

A prize is typically given for both content and presentation of a work, so a typical fair way to handle prize money, whether for poster or paper, is to offer to split it evenly amongst all of the co-authors. Co-authors who feel they have not offered a full share of work might choose to decline their share, but the basic assumption should be an even split. ...


29

The primary issues with using Wikipedia for academic research are that it's a tertiary source, and there's no credibility/quality assurance. So, you should make sure that If the image contains intellectual content that requires citation, you should cite a primary source for that content. The image (including its factual/intellectual content) meets ...


29

I would recommend another option: present the current truth of your work and results. You can get feedback on the methods and approach and somebody may even be able to point out adjustments to your approach that may help the work. Even just talking to people outside of your lab can be an important part of developing as a researcher. Don't try to hide the ...


28

Several reasons. Conflicts of Interest. If you're doing climate change research that's funded by The Society of People Who Think Global Warming is Poppycock, you need to mention this. Organizations with a clear interest in a specific outcome are much more likely to produce research that affirms their desired outcome than they do those that refute it, ...


27

A conference, or workshop where the posters are printed for you is very exceptional. It sounds reasonable to print all posters for the presenters locally but you can print posters much cheaper at university than in any copy shop, because its subsidized some prefer a cheap preprint, others are willing to pay for the nice glossy high quality print. the ...


26

It depends on what you want to do. If you feel like at this point in your research it would be more beneficial to converse than to present, then I'd say that a poster session is the right venue for you. It's true that talks are considered a bit more prestigious than poster sessions, but you really should go with what you think will be more valuable for you, ...


21

If both institutions have supported your project, you should acknowledge both in your poster. To save space, you have a variety of options: Make the logos smaller by scaling them. If available, use a small, square version of the logo rather than a larger rectangular version. Put the logos in a part of the poster that is underutilized. (For example, left-...


21

I don't think you actually need a reason to decline. Saving the work for submission elsewhere is perfectly reasonable in any case. All you need to reply is "No, thank you". Posters are good for preliminary work and for students wanting some exposure and an opportunity to meet other researchers, of course. But the work is yours and you don't need to ...


19

Having an invited talk and not having been invited is unusual, indeed. Maybe your professor was invited and passed the ball to you; the best thing to do is asking him/her. "Oral" also is unusual for me (but maybe not in other fields). As noted in the other answer, typically the hierarchy is, from most to least prestigious: keynote/plenary: people who were ...


19

There are two levels of issues that you may have to cope with. First, let's look at what to do at the conference: You already suggested some options: just talk about my work This might serve as a last resort fallback, but it probably does not leave too good an impression. Maybe more importantly, talking about your work might be more difficult ...


19

It is what it is, at least as far as the official program is concerned -- tell the missing author about it and apologize. What's more important in practice is that all authors are listed on the actual poster you will be presenting. That's what people really see and will notice, so make sure it is complete.


18

Someone should probably stay by your poster throughout. If there is no one there it won't generate much of any interest. Posters are seldom so self explanatory that people will gain much without a bit of help. Perhaps a colleague or even your professor would be willing to help you out for a portion of the time required. But it should be someone who can ...


17

As so often, this may be field-specific, so I'm giving a CS perspective: Posters are not full papers. Often, it is totally acceptable that a poster presents work in progress, or preliminary results. While a paper adds some vague hints to separate future steps in continuing the research after presenting a finished contribution, on a poster, that can well be ...


17

A paper submitted to a conference can be accepted either as an oral talk, a poster talk, or a short demo/industry track, with variations (small talks, long talks, plenary talks, e-posters, etc.). In some fields, the poster is considered less important, and will not be published as a paper in proceedings. In others, they have the same importance. Conferences ...


16

If your work was supported by your employer, then you should use your company address to acknowledge the affiliation. If it's work done in your spare time that is not sponsored by your employer, use your personal details. Don't bother with the phone number – in academia, it's generally considered bad etiquette to call someone unexpectedly (unless it's an ...


16

I am two days away from a poster presentation. I opted to write mine in Latex because a poster in Latex looks professional. If you are totally confident that your content is so striking that no-one will pay attention to the graphic art, then write your poster however you want. The risk in a hand-made home-crafted poster is that it will stand out for the ...


15

From my experience impact of posters is way, way lower than of a talk. If you can get a single person listening to you for 20 min with a poster, it is much. Plus, usually, people are distracted (noise, people moving around). And before they can ask questions, they need time to learn what you are presenting anyway. So if you have a choice between talk and ...


15

Yes. Everybody who is listed as an author should see and be able to contribute to the poster. You wouldn't want to be listed as an author of a work that you have never seen either, right?


15

It may be better to start from your elevator pitch, rather than the abstract. If you don't have an elevator pitch, prepare that first. The term "elevator pitch" comes from a scenario in which you happen to be in an elevator, or other situation allowing for a very short interaction, with somebody you want to influence. What do you say? The objective is not ...


14

Is it Okay, if I speak my abstract only along with a figure? No, because usually your abstract is (usually) containing very condensed information and uses a sentence structure that is most suited for written language. If you just read your abstract, most people in the audience will have a hard time to follow you and not remember the essentials. You can ...


14

I have actually done this before -- finally managed to get the blasted thing printed out by about three in the morning, shambled home, left the poster tube on top of my bag, and still managed to leave it behind when I left the next^W later that morning. There's a longer version of this story which involves much running around a building with flapping ...


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