218

Aeismail’s answer is spot on: who you choose to dedicate it to is entirely up to you (modulo political expedience). I've read theses dedicated to martyrs and I've read theses dedicated to cats. Do what you feel moved to do. See answers here for some discussion. As for how it would be received by the Jewish community and Jewish mathematicians, I am confident ...


137

tl;dr: Although it is possible to have Brexit without British science suffering, this would require meaningful political support, and there is little to suggest that this will be forthcoming in the near future. A recent report by the Royal Society provides some context. This report is focussed on the British research sector as a whole, rather than on ...


125

I've been working in Academia for the past ten years. The only cases of degree revocation that I am aware of were due to severe cases of academic misconduct such as plagiarism, fraud, or large-scale cheating. The rationale is that gross academic misconduct invalidates the achievement the degree should certify. Revocations on grounds of expression of (...


98

This appears to have been under the instruction of President Trump, as news sites reported data on the EPA website was removed. Speculation usually doesn't belong in a scientific paper. This is especially true when it does not further the scientific purpose of the paper. The rest of the statement - about the document no longer being available at its ...


93

A good question. Why would the school make this investment (which could be closer to $100K/year)? As pointed out, if you are TAing/grading/teaching, you are providing services that the school charges undergraduates for. The funding of a university is not entirely like that of a business. Some of the money is a direct investment in purely academic pursuits, ...


88

Since you ask for a framework for thinking about it, I'll suggest that an action on your part that disadvantages the author, perhaps already a victim, won't bring justice. Probably better to ignore that detail and focus on what the author says, and honestly give the usual feedback. If you want to try to deal with the unfairness of the annexation, there are ...


66

In addition to the practical, and very important answers that others have already given I will make this point about the emotional impact. I'm a UK citizen in academia, but a lot of my colleagues, collaborators and students (both UG and PG) are from the EU. Before the Brexit vote they had almost exactly the same rights as me to live and work in UK academia. ...


65

I can't tell you what is the 'best' solution to your situation, but I can share with you how I would approach it. If you allow, a few words about my background. After a Ph.D., I went to Wall Street. In my second job, a person who was senior to most people in my group was universally despised (the mere fact to be assigned to work with him made a female ...


65

I sit on our university's Senate which is the body that would have to deliberate a degree revocation. Even a straight-forward case of plagiarism in a degree requires a long, drawn-out and surprisingly contentious decision, and it might happen once or twice a decade. This is the last step of a very, very long and drawn-out process. So no, I wouldn't worry, ...


62

I'm probably going to get rated through the floor for this one, but there are two obvious things sticking out to me I consider worth pointing out. First the possible resolutions you list and want to decide between appear equally ridiculous to me. Basically it sounds like you want to have St Peter descend from heaven with the book of good and bad deeds, get ...


61

Who you choose to recognize in your acknowledgments is up to you. If you would like to dedicate it to the memory of someone, that's entirely your choice. If you are worried about the political backlash, you could submit the thesis to the reviewer without the dedication and acknowledgments and then add those at the end.


57

Since you are concerned, it must be a good idea to look into the rules, as @Penguin_Knight suggests. But it would be absolutely shocking if you were not allowed to volunteer for a particular candidate or party: by restricting you from doing that, the university would be infringing upon your own political freedom. I am concerned that I am in a position ...


56

A political or ideological answer, albeit honest, is usually a missed opportunity to make a point about the move being a good academic fit. Your goal as the candidate in this kind of exchange is not just to answer the questions accurately; it's to answer the questions accurately while also trying to convince the committee that you are the right person for ...


53

Universities don't "fund" Ph.D. candidates. They pay them salaries - or what should be recognized as salaries - to do research. In more normal states (such as the Netherlands), nobody is trying to deny this fact, and PhD candidates are formally in a employer-employee legal relation with their university. In other states (such as the US, or rather individual ...


48

The EU organises and funds programmes such as Horizon 2020, the Erasmus programme, and Erasmus Mundus. None of those can be replaced by the UK government in isolation. On a personal note. Why do I feel so strongly? I am a Dutch citizen and presently a postdoc in England. I have personally benefitted tremendously from freedom of movement and from all ...


42

Definitely point this out. The whole point of soliciting a review is to identify issues in the paper. You should not assume the editor knows the map on page 7 is inappropriate, just like you shouldn’t assume they are aware that step 5 of the methodology is unsound. The editor may choose to ignore your comment, but that is up to them. They should not be ...


41

a mathematics thesis might not be the place to "confront" like this. No, I disagree. There are few ways in academia to draw attention to this crime more powerful than the acknowledgements section of your thesis. I hope you choose to do so! Also, to speak to another part of your comment . . . I am a Muslim student in a non-Arab country. Would it be ...


39

Just responding to the isolation part... I am a non-EU postdoc working in UK. Postdocs have short contracts and visas are tied to contracts. I have recently got to 5 years and therefore residency after 4 short term visas. Total visa costs (just for me) over 5500 GBP and no funding provided. Add in my partner's visas to get the full cost. Also, without ...


38

I think the chances of having your degree revoked for criticizing the political choices of a university are more or less zero. Degrees are awarded for academic reasons, not moral ones. The exception to this is honorary degrees. Honorary degrees are given to some for expressly moral judgement even though the recipient hasn't completed any classes or met the ...


33

Once you are threatened with closure, it is probably too late to fix your problems. Increase enrollment of new students with marketing. Increase retention of students with better teaching and extracurricular experiences. Seek donations. Find a new source of revenue. Unionize. A union contract can force cross-subsidies from money-making departments to money-...


32

A lot of people don't seem to realize that acknowledgments are most often inserted into the thesis after the committee has read and signed off on it. On the one hand this is justified because they are not part of the intellectual content of the thesis, and indeed the committee should not be swayed by the acknowledgments in either way. On the other hand, ...


30

Unless you are at an unusually restrictive university (Liberty University, Bob Jones University, etc) there are absolutely no problems with professors engaging in political activities. Indeed professors can and have run for office, been appointed to cabinet positions, etc. To make this very simple: Condoleeza Rice is a professor at my institution. This is ...


29

This is, in fact, the second time that Leicester's maths department has faced these kind of threats. The previous time (in 2016), they backed down following a petition and other objections organised by a variety of mathematicians.


27

Personal politics aside, I feel attempting to remove/removing any data from the internet is disgraceful, and I want to express that in my report Well, that isn't putting personal politics aside, is it? That is literally going out of your way to put personal politics into your report. It doesn't belong there. Don't do it! Instead, use your blog or local pub ...


27

"But since the UK pays the EU more than it receives in benefits, the UK could simply redirect some of that money into science. It could be that the UK does not actually redirect the money, but that would be because the UK as a whole decided that science isn't worth it, in which case it would be democracy in action and one can't really complain." That's the ...


27

There is no predicting personality without close study, but if the person is a true scholar they will welcome an advance, even if it refutes something they did earlier. No, hostility isn't an unreasonable possibility. But whether it is likely depends on the person. Impossible to say how likely. You are in a better position to judge, knowing them. Are they ...


26

There are no upsides for British science from Brexit. This is a corollary of the almost certain fact that there are no upsides for British society from Brexit. Science funding has never been a priority of the current government and I hardly expect that situation to change once we leave with no deal. In truth, we are cutting off access to collaborations (e....


24

ff524 has covered the question from the angle of a PhD student hire, I will discuss it from the angle of (senior) faculty hires, which I think are slightly different in that regard. If you have already, as you say, 10 years faculty at an institution you are presumably tenured there. When you then apply elsewhere, an undercurrent of the entire application ...


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