Hot answers tagged

89

I feel like you're overthinking this. What you did seems an improvement to me over taking, say, bowling to fill a last credit, which isn't uncommon in undergrad. The professor gave you your grade and you're off to grad school. There's no reason to revisit it, with yourself or anyone else. Also, it isn't your responsibility, as a student, to audit how a ...


88

Since you ask for a framework for thinking about it, I'll suggest that an action on your part that disadvantages the author, perhaps already a victim, won't bring justice. Probably better to ignore that detail and focus on what the author says, and honestly give the usual feedback. If you want to try to deal with the unfairness of the annexation, there are ...


64

When it comes to "he-said, she-said" situations, as seems to be the case here, most institutions will tend to take the side of professors by default. For obvious reasons—the 18–22 year old college student is much more likely to lie to obtain a favourable mark, than the professor is to act maliciously to sabotage a student. The only scenario where the ...


55

It's rather subtle trying to decide what counts as gender preferential treatment. For example, suppose the hiring committee decides to interview Bob, Carl, and Dave. As a sanity check, someone goes through the applications from women to see whether anyone was overlooked, and they are impressed by Alice's application. There's some debate about whether she ...


52

FERPA permits education records to be shared with school officials who have a "legitimate educational interest" in them. Examples of a "legitimate educational interest" include (via University of Northern Iowa): Performing appropriate tasks that are specified in his/her position description or by a contract agreement. Performing a task related to a ...


47

Many schools, including the one where I got my undergraduate degree, have a system whereby a student can get credit for a course by proving that he knows the material --- usually by taking exams but possibly by other means. There's usually a limit on how may credits one can get this way. Even if your school doesn't have such a system, the availability of ...


47

I can assure you, that there will never be any consequences from this, that's for certain. You asked the professor - she allowed it. It's her problem, not yours. You won't ever lose this degree, because you did something totally legal. In terms of morality: Those grades are - in the end - not made for universities, but rather for companies to have a rating ...


37

In Germany, women are in some instances preferred over men for professor positions, to the point of excluding male applicants at all. There are scholarships and other forms of funding specifically (and exclusively) geared towards women (at all levels). A prominent example is special funding for female professors by BMBF: [Secretary of Education Schavan:]...


37

As for addressing what already happened, this obviously depends a lot on what rules you have, but it may still be worth looking whether you have some of those very broad rules demanding mutual respect, not being a nuisance, not damaging the university, etc. These need not be in the students’ code of conduct, but might as well be in the enrolment contract or ...


34

To give one data point on how this issue is actually framed and enforced by universities (or at least public universities in the US), let me quote from my university's Campus Administrative Manual: An individual may not initiate or participate in institutional decisions involving a direct benefit or penalty to someone with whom that individual has had ...


31

Some universities can get a better deal from a supplier by promising them to buy exclusively, or to buy sufficiently much from them It is easier for the accounting department to deal with the same provider, since they can re-use the same documents. Dealing with a new provider has a certain degree of risk, including the quality of products, the timeliness of ...


30

I think that this is unprofessional, and is leaving the institution open to all sorts of action (up to and including legal proceedings, if it impacts on a student's progression, for example). For example, what if a student is unavoidably absent? If it's only "worth a point or two", then I don't think it's worth antagonising people in this way. The ...


28

I have not come far in my career but I have a family of academics, this question certainly came up a number of times over the years. I guess the main point of having a formal requirement of foreign exchange/post-doc period is two-folds: to avoid the drawbacks of academic inbreeding. Academia is partially built on a strong tutor-pupil, or rather mentor-...


28

First, let me say that you should read the answers to my related question. One answer is quite clear that you should not even bother checking (the author of that answer did admit being uncomfortable with that answer...as I am). This is a significant problem at my university. One way we try to address it is that we have students verbally answer a quick, ...


28

This type of question can only be answered by your advisor and thesis committee. They know what caused your delay, and they can likely advise you as to what should be your only—not your top, your only—priority at this point. Once you graduate, all your other projects can resume, but at this point you have one task, and that is to graduate. Only the ...


28

I think we can all agree that missing more than 25% of the lectures is unacceptable (and the excuse that the instructor has other academic commitments is unconvincing to say the least: if I cancelled class every time I had other looming academic commitments, I would be cancelling class a lot more than 27% of the time). This is one of the more serious ...


28

If it really makes a difference, you could put each exam in a sealed manila envelope. When you announce that the students can begin, then they can tear open the envelope and remove the exam. Lots of standardized tests use this approach.


27

Since you asked for norms at other schools, here is one data point: UC Berkeley has an explicit policy on this subject. At UC Berkeley, instructors own the copyright on their course materials and are allowed to specify the policy on dissemination. In additional, dissemination for a commercial purpose is prohibited without express consent of the instructor. ...


27

You should do whatever you or your institution would ordinarily do for a student who brought a doctor's note after missing an exam. You are not the student's doctor and the cause of the student's illness is completely irrelevant.


26

Independent re-evaluation and re-grading In my institution a situation like that "The real strike comes at the end of the semester" complaint and dispute with some potential risk of unfair grading or not following due process because of some personal animosity would result in the student's submitted work being regraded and any oral exams/presentations/...


25

First define the problem. "It feels wrong" isn't really an actionable reason right? Is the problem that the student published the exam with answers? Is the problem that the student removed the exam with answers when she/he was expected to return it to the instructor? Is the problem that the student published the exam with answers on a 'cheater' website? To ...


25

Is it allowed to have a sexual relationship between a Professor and a graduate student? This depends on the university's rules. Pretty much every plausible set of rules you can think of is used somewhere: everything is allowed (well, generally not explicitly, but by not having rules for this at all), nothing is allowed, it's allowed only if they are in ...


24

I am afraid that your question is based on a wrong premise, which I will try to correct. Most (if not all) universities in the UK give their students and staff an email address in zone .ac.uk. Most universities in the UK provide their email via outlook services. Outlook is a product/service offered by an international company which has physical servers in ...


23

This is often done to prevent funneling money from the university to friends outside the university. If Prof A has a friend who sells IT gear, the prof cannot preferentially funnel orders to that friend's company unless they are on the approved list. Having an approved list means that each and every order for paper, staples, or whatever does not need to be ...


23

It might help to understand where your Dean is coming from. I work for my university's research administration department, and I can understand his position. For context, we are an R1 university in the United States. There are likely a few things going on: Grants often create liabilities for universities. There may be cost-sharing requirements or other ...


22

Since you speak of "a small group who cheat," it sounds like most of the students do understand the policies and importance of honesty. That remaining small group who cheats? Nothing that you do or say is going to convince them not to cheat. Likewise, university policies often make it hard to actually punish cheaters, because they begin with the ...


22

You do not currently hold a 91%. You may have held a 91% percent yesterday, but now you hold a 76%. Am I wrong to feel as though this is an unfair mark? Given that you knew the policy in advance and the teacher seems to have been consistent in taking attendance, you seem to have no logical reason to feel the mark is unfair. You state that attendance is ...


22

This is a special case of a question about boycotts, but I see nothing in it that is unique to the situation of an academic reviewer as opposed to any other person needing to make a decision about whether to participate in a boycott of some group of people (other perhaps than the fact that a decision to participate will come at zero cost to you in this case)....


21

Proposals to "reform" or end tenure are not new—they have been going around for several decades at least (as I remember such stories when I was an undergraduate in the 1990's). This is not yet enacted legislation—it is merely a proposal that, as far as I can tell, probably has not even had any hearings yet. As such, I would suspect that such a bill would be ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible