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First of all, keep in mind that graduate admissions is really trickier than matching acceptance/rejections with GPA and GRE results. That doesn't mean they're not important. With an all A transcript and a decent general GRE, your profile will almost certainly get looked at, and that's already great. Physics GRE is also important for Physics PhD application, ...


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Yes. Graduate admissions committees at good universities are looking to recruit students who will publish a lot of high quality papers. The best predictor of future publications is past publications. By comparison, coursework is less important. The Physics GRE is a very poor predictor of your ability to write good research papers. You should still ...


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I don't think the couple years off to get research experience will help you. Really they are looking for raw brains. How were your SATs? Or your math grades? Theoretical physics has huge numerical odds against you in terms of jobs just based on numbers. Going into the field when you are below average is an especially bad idea.


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The results of the PGRE - which do not require any graduate level courses - are a reasonable predictor of success. Another important point is the research potential of the applicant, which will typically be harder to demonstrate for someone from a smaller program with fewer research opportunities for undergraduates.


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I do not know much in your field. In computer science (e.g., machine learning), I think no one can ensure the code is 100% correct. To my point of view, I think two most important things in research are (1) idea and (2) presentation. Once you can clearly convey your idea to your audiences, I think that is the good article, which has its own value. As such, ...


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It depends. A good student who is very self motivated can rise above. That means you would need to be doing a lot of work in addition to the work assigned in class. If you can do that, consistently for your entire degree, you can come out knowing as much as you would in a "tough" school. It's a two-fold challenge. First, there is doing it and keeping it ...


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In the US it is possible to switch after undergraduate, but I'll note that the focus of an engineering degree is very different from mathematics. I'd suggest that you switch as early as possible. One reason that first year math isn't as rigorous as it might be, and not as rigorous as it will be later, is that those courses are intended for a general ...


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