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1

Moving between different BSc/MSc programs, at least within Europe, shouldn't be seen as a problem: After all, one key point of the whole Bologna process (ECTS points etc.) was to make it easier to switch between different places in the course of your studies. (Whether this worked is a different question, but at least, that's the philosophy behind.) So in ...


3

The most important is not really where you do your PhD but rather if you can publish some quality research papers during your PhD. I have a few post-doctoral researchers in my team, and I have hired them because they are somewhat close to my research area but mostly because they have shown that they can write and publish good papers during their PhD. This ...


2

Are the criteria for post doctoral study even "stricter" The criteria for getting a postdoctoral position are not important. People who hire postdocs generally have to spend the money by a deadline. If they do not hire someone, they might have to return the money. They hire the best person they can, not every person who is qualified. The ...


2

I know it may sound a bit crazy, but is it not an option for you to pursue a second master's in a foreign university and then apply from there for a phd? There are even some programs, where the master's takes only 1 year (I have heard about it in Germany). You could work as an intern at a lab during that time and could continue your phd at that lab.


2

I think it would be wise to take one step at a time, and the next would be to secure a satisfying position as a PhD student. You seem to be willing to move and are also open for different countries. That is definitely a plus and your general approach makes sense as far as I can tell. I am not sure what you mean by "PhD program". To me that sounds ...


2

We cannot tell you what to do with your life, that's for you to decide. However, note that there are mixed degrees and many programs for either Physics or Computer Science will require you to choose a minor subject, which then would be easy picking for you. I'd recommend to start either with a mixed variant or with one as the major and the other as the minor....


-1

Should I apply for it or another master in the same subject will be a drawback for admission committees It's likely getting another (3rd?) master's degree won't help much and may signal indecisiveness in admissions committees. You've already proven you can get a master's degree in a STEM subject. It may raise concerns that you will "Master Out" ...


3

One option is to contact the first author (or try the other authors). It may be the the paper was never published, or if it was it ended up in a different journal or published in a different year (which can make tracking down harder). The difficulty here is that the paper was from ~1974 so it may be tricky to track down the current contact information for ...


3

I found the following from a Google search: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0550-3213(74)90355-1. If that's not it, then browse through the archive of Nuclear Physics B for 1974, from 61(1) to 83(3), perhaps going a little further (maybe it didn't appear in 1974). Maybe there's a faster way, e.g., an author index for Nuclear Physics B. Using a more directed Google ...


6

My opinion. At your age (at any age) planning years ahead is hard. I'd recommend doing what excites you most and what you're best at. That seems to be chemistry. Doors may open (or close) down the road that you can't foresee.


3

I would recommend against this. Not that it is wrong, but that it is unlikely to get you anything you can't get yourself from a literature search. Most such conferences are recurring, perhaps annual. Find the proceedings of the conference for the previous few years and see what you find. The abstracts of articles may be enough to see what the landscape looks ...


1

I would focus on the research "questions" that you will attempt to answer. What hypotheses you have about the subject in question. Something about how you will begin to attack the questions (methodology), even if not too detailed. If time permits, something about where you think the research would lead you in the future. If you already have ...


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