We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.

New answers tagged

2

I know of four approaches, and to my knowledge, all are commonly used. I'm coming from theoretical chemistry, so not quite theoretical physics, but not so different. Often the data is made public, especially from large collaborations. For example: http://opendata.atlas.cern/ Otherwise, ask the original authors for their data. Often they'll share. ...


4

I will give a separate answer for textbooks and for scholarly papers. The difference is that textbooks normally come with exercises to help solidify the understanding of the material. For a scholarly work in a technical field, however, a proven method is to read the paper three times, but with a different focus each time. The first reading is something ...


1

Related to your first point, but instead of just writing down whatever you read, you could summarize the material and write down the important points. You could also write them in the form of a blog post (not necessarily public), where you explain the key ideas to the reader. Combining multiple sources (point 3) would be even better -- you might end up ...


0

I don't think you have anything to worry about. You seem to be doing the right thing in your major and that will be the important consideration for grad school. But anything you do to increase supplementary skills is a positive thing, not negative. For example, even an online no-credit course can increase your skills and would have a small positive effect. ...


Top 50 recent answers are included