145

I'm deeply involved in web technologies, including search results. The simplest and fastest way to solve this problem is to add other search results. The more "legitimate" and positive results found, the less likely the others will be seen. There are numerous factors in raising search results, but still: Create another Stack Exchange account with your name ...


133

Relax. No one cares, and no one will judge you on what you said when you were 12. (At least, no one who was ever 12 years old themselves...)


108

There is a very easy solution. Your supervisor can simply write something like To whom it may concern, It is a pleasure to write in recommendation of John Smith (no relation). John is...etc., etc. Sincerely, Professor Tom Smith


102

As a possible solution if you are still worried about it: Get an ORCID account. They basically created an ID, a DOI for researchers. If you link your publications to your ORC-ID, you don't need to worry if your name is very common (e.g. John Smith) or if someone misspelled your name.


101

Excuse me, do you prefer me to call you Dr Smith or Ellen? A polite question will solve all your doubts.


99

As somebody with accents in the name who does not put them on scientific papers, I would recommend going with the way they put their names on the papers. Certain people are very particular about having the right accents, but others (including myself) consider them a nuisance and avoid them. The only way to know in the particular case is to check the paper ...


99

I'm not sure how far ethics comes into this, but omitting accents is, effectively, a misspelling of the name. If you need to cite something by Schön, and you instead write "Schon", I'd regard that as analogous to writing "Schöm" or "Schöh": pretty close, but certainly a typo. If I'm reviewing a paper, I will request correction of missing accents as I would ...


87

I am sorry for your experience. Regarding the naming issue, I think that it is alright and no one will comment about it. You do not have to email that person again. Regarding the publication, You should not be silent. It is an authorship dispute. If he published them in a peer-reviewed journal. Email the editor in chief all the documents, the LOR that ...


80

Yes. You get to decide what name appears on your publications.


74

This is, unfortunately, a case where English grammar can be tricky and exactly how you phrase things is going to matter. It is often seen a presumptuous to name something after yourself: "Newton's Laws" and "Hawking radiation" and "Rayleigh scattering" are retrospective judgements of significance by the community. Claiming a similar name is an assertion in ...


70

When I am chairing a session, I always check a few minutes beforehand to ensure that all of the speakers are there. That's also a good time to check on pronunciation of names. Just say something like: Can you please say your name for me? I'd like to pronounce it right when I introduce you. Then it will be fresh in your mind, there'll be a decent ...


69

I would distinguish between narrative and citation. In narrative text, it is best to refer to a person by their current most preferred scientific name. In citation, on the other hand, it is best to provide the information that will best guide lookup of the document in various search and databases. When the two are not clearly connected, giving a footnote ...


69

Your question has a lengthy introduction, but finally: If at some point I will need to prove the authorship of a certain publication that bears a name slightly, or significantly different from what is in my documents, will that be a problem? No. A slight difference that can be explained by differences in transliteration is not a problem. This is not a ...


68

You have two choices. Either just use your given name, e.g., as in Matthew B. Dwyer, John Hatcliff, Robby, Venkatesh Prasad Ranganath: Exploiting Object Escape and Locking Information in Partial-Order Reductions for Concurrent Object-Oriented Programs. That has two advantages – it's formally and culturally correct – and two disadvantages – you will have to ...


65

European Union privacy rules include certain aspects of the right to be forgotten. I am not an expert on what this means precisely, but it seems to include the right to have search engines remove certain information associated with your name from search results. Here is another page provided by Google with more information and a form for submitting privacy-...


64

I really don't think this is close to such a big issue as you seem to make it. What's really bothering me in your question is the following: So far, I have managed to avoid this issue by choosing my words very strategically to avoid directly addressing my adviser at all. You are investing way too much effort into addressing this non-issue. As I see it, ...


64

Going by "Dr. FirstName" is just confusing. If people aren't familiar with you, they will think it is your last name. If they do know you, it doesn't seem more casual, just odd. It depends on the context and culture, but in the US it is standard to go by either "Dr. LastName" or just "FirstName." Like Solar Mike mentioned, a shortened form like "Dr. Initial"...


56

Yes, a PhD is essentially an apprenticeship in academic research, so they should be treated as a colleague in potential (it seems normal practice for an RA to refer to their supervisor by their first name). Also I think it is a bad idea for researchers to be overly formal and deferential towards their supervisors; if you ware working at the cutting edge of ...


50

Not everybody in the world fits into the western idea of first name, maybe middle name/names, last name. Regardless of what your ID card says, you can publish your papers under whatever name you want. Some people use pseudonyms. Much more common is that many women continue to publish under their maiden name when they marry and change their surname. There's ...


50

Check your style guide. Many surname-year styles, such as APA, have provisions for exactly this problem. But do you know how to proceed when a reference list includes publications by two or more different primary authors with the same surname? When this occurs, include the lead author’s initials in all text citations, even if the year of publication ...


49

Complementary to your own suggestions and the ones in the other answers, you could consider creating an ORCID (or of course any other unique researcher/author ID) and using it in all publications. The benefits here: By adding a unique identifier to your name, the name collisions can be resolved. If your change your name at a certain point (e.g., if you ...


47

As other have commented, the length of your hyphenated surname is not problematic at all: keep it and don't worry. Fun fact. Uh, well, it took me years to discover that Lennard-Jones was actually just one person and not two, and that the Hanbury-Brown-Twiss experiment was devised by two people and not three, Hanbury Brown (no hyphen) and Twiss. For Jaynes-...


47

Arguably, you did the right thing. In my experience, too many names tend to confuse people. I have 2+2 and I saw my name being cited in lots of different ways, without any consistency. One thing that really helps to prove that you are the same person is to set up an ORCID and use it in the publications.


47

A certain amount of separation from your students has value. You have some power over their future, for example. The use of usted implies respect as well. This is useful if any conflicts arise in the future where you need to take a role of authority. But, having a friendly and open relationship with your students is also useful if it gives them the "...


46

You can certainly do so. Something like "I was born here. I did my undergraduate degree here, my masters degree here, and my PhD here. After my PhD ..." etc. It doesn't have to be very long and could also be part of your lecture slides. One of my lecturers from my bachelor's degree did this, and I still remember she and my brother shared an alma mater.


45

You need to pick a name that you'll use in your professional life. Changing that name has a cost. At this early stage, the cost is low. So, if you want to use your married name professionally, then change to it now. Otherwise, use your maiden name for the duration of your career. (This isn't to say you can't switch later, just that the cost increases over ...


42

If you have a middle name, then you could add a hyphen to derive a new name, e.g., Alpha Bravo Charlie could become Alpha Bravo-Charlie. Does this seem like a worthwhile idea? Yes Could there be any issues with having different legal and professional names in a university IT system? Yes, but this will vary university to university. An obvious problem ...


41

By the way, I have heard your last name pronounced a few different ways and I want to make sure I get it right. Can you teach me the correct way to pronounce it?


40

I am in your exact same situation: Spanish name with 2+2. I have lived abroad for 6 years now, most of it in Ireland. There is no way out of misunderstandings, I'm afraid, and your second last name will often be assumed to be your only family name. Here is a recipe that has worked out for me so far: For a non legally-critical situation, e.g. your name on ...


40

This question is definitely more of a online reputation management question so my only advice is buckle up and try to anonymize your past actions. Here are some suggestions: Change your username on those forums and remove profile details Often times this will globally change your name across all your posts Contact the forums and ask them to de-associate ...


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