104

Straight answer: NO it's not a good idea Citing someone is (and should) be neither a favor nor a gesture of politeness. So there's no point to send a thank you email. Thanking someone for a citation seems a way to beg for something. If you want to collaborate send an email explaining why you want to collaborate, or mention that you have read their paper ...


70

The short answer is: we let publishers profit off of our work because many of us are egocentrics seeking prestige. At least it was the major reason at the creation of the modern academic publishing system. The rest of us can do little to change this, since our careers depend on it. However, I think this could change soon since more and more academics are ...


67

IMHO it depends on why you want to make it available. If your primary reason is that you want to make information available more publicly, you could produce a "revised edition" of the thesis and add a preface stating that this is a substantially revised and edited version of your thesis - just like other books do. If you just correct typos and grammar, ...


61

Making the paper accessible to everyone who can't look behind the paywall might hurt the journal's publishing company a little bit by diverting some demand. However, it won't really hurt the people you have been dealing with. Moreover, the journal has given you explicit permission to publish a pre-print, so you're not going against their stated request. At ...


60

I am a high school student who has worked on multiple (well, 4 to be exact) pure math and CS papers. All of them deal with fairly significant problems, so some of them have been published by now too. Wow. That's awesome! Today, I saw a paper which looked quite similar to a paper that I published back in May. I was shocked to notice that the author ...


47

The prospect of getting "scooped" in extensions to your research project is rarely a big problem, because you always maintain a head-start on others through the period of time it takes for a paper to go from completion and submission to a journal to publication. Even if your paper is extremely well-written in the first instance, there is usually ...


46

It's not necessarily crazy for academia.edu to ask for these things (although, as I say below, I certainly don't think users should agree to these terms). I imagine their lawyers advised them to use an agreement that covers all possible use cases as their business model evolves. For example, if they decided to charge their users membership fees, and only ...


46

Aside from giving excellent talks at important conferences, here are several other ideas. I've seen all of these work (although rarely all for the same paper). Maintain a freely available copy (or at least an arXiv link) on your personal web page. Keep your CV up to date, including links to freely available version of all your papers. Make sure Google ...


46

the editors reject it on the basis of size of the reference list rather than focussing on the quality of the manuscript. I think that's a false distinction. From the view of the journal (and most publication outlets I know), one aspect of a manuscript's quality is that it needs to defend its novelty by appropriately considering related work. The feedback ...


45

This varies substantially, depending on the sort of book, how well the author negotiated (each book involves an individually negotiated contract), the price of the book, etc. Based on one Springer contract I'm familiar with, here's a first approximation. I can't say for sure how representative it is, but it's at least one data point, and I'd guess it's ...


45

I can't even imagine a situation in which criticizing published academic materials on their merits would be wrong or immoral. How would it be different from criticizing someone's selection of an econometric or statistical model to use on their data? This happens constantly in academic literature, and in fact is crucial to the process of research. The ...


45

Sure, all you have to do is not publish your work.


43

It's of questionable legality, but it's not going to lead to prosecution. For me personally using sci-hub has led to new research results in fields outside of my specialization that will (very likely) appear in leading peer reviewed journals. One problem I'm not sure about is whether it's wise to say in the acknowledgements: "I thank Alexandra Elbakyan for ...


41

Why are so many people publishing [on ArXiv]? You have to be careful with terminology when making statements like that. ArXiv is certainly "publishing" in the literal sense of "making public" but would you say that you'd "published a book" if you'd just put it on your website? Probably not. My question is, why were journals used to begin with? Because ...


41

Springer has a privacy policy. It seems to be largely based on the European Union's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). According to XIV, point 2, you can request a removal of your personal data on specific grounds, e.g. because the data are not needed, or because you withdraw your consent. This seems to be the case with you. You can contact their ...


40

This often happens when a document uses the CMYK color space and the black is set as (0,0,0,100). When you go print in a monochrome environment, the document's color information is converted to grayscale first. Because black ink on white paper can't actually create gray, a halftoning process is applied, where the shades of gray are hinted at by using a ...


40

In the future, your university librarians are MADE for this! Don't feel ashamed to ask -- there are librarians more into archiving and cataloging, and some more into education and service. Give as much information as you currently have, and they'll find it for you AND/OR show you how to find it yourself in the future (if it's accessible via a resource ...


38

No, you shouldn't just submit to the arXiv instead of journals. Articles in the arXiv are not considered published in the traditional sense, and they are not peer reviewed. In fields that use the arXiv, papers are typically submitted there and to a journal (but you can do this only if the journal's policies permit it, so you should check if you aren't ...


38

No, because citation is a matter of transparency to scholarship generally... No, one does not "thank" someone for citing one's paper. An academic author is obliged to cite a paper when he/she is either placing reliance on or referring to its ideas, content, or argument. An academic author does not cite a paper simply because he/she wants to promote ...


35

Why donʼt you contact the Leiden Universityʼs library for advice? Iʼm sure that the library has a copy of it, and they might have translations as well. The author seems to be very prolific, the library has many pieces of his work listed on their online catalog.


35

Often, most of the citations in a paper are not work that you directly rely on. Of course you cite a paper if you use their model, their method, or if your model or method or algorithm is a direct extension of theirs. But you also cite papers of people you solved (or attacked) similar problems or used related methods. You discuss what they have done and ...


34

Translations are considered a "derivative work." Preparation of a derivative work is one of the exclusive rights attached to the copyright holder. If the article you wish to publish is not in the public domain or under a license that allows preparation of derivative work, you must get permission from the copyright holder to translate it. (Unless one of the ...


33

A reprint of the paper is available under DOI 10.1007/978-94-009-2079-8_15, the complete title is "Further experiments with liquid helium. C. On the change of electric resistance of pure metals at very low temperatures etc. IV. The resistance of pure mercury at helium temperatures." I was able to find this by excluding the author's given name; this expands ...


32

What do you expect from a good bachelor's thesis? The expectations for a bachelor's thesis vary from country to country and from field to field. However, I think the main points can be summarised as follows: the author shows a good understanding of the given problem the author is aware of the existing literature in the field, can discuss the literature ...


31

Is it unethical to make considerable changes to the text No, it's not unethical, but if you make changes it would be useful to include a note or a preface disclosing that that is an amended version of your original thesis, and if your conclusions have changed considerably after further experience, you can explain why.


30

You have two issues to deal with. If you properly cite and attribute the ideas to the original author, you avoid plagiarism issues. If you don't copy too much, but properly quote, from the paper then you avoid copyright issues. But, ideas are free to use and to adapt. Simplifying what you find in a paper is a good thing to do. One doesn't obtain ...


30

As an example, you may be interested in the morning paper, which does exactly that daily for one paper in systems / software engineering / programming languages / AI. Notably, from the entire setup it is very clear that the author of the blog is not the one who originally did the research. The original paper and authors are very clearly named, right at the ...


28

First of all, ArXiv covers mathematical disciplines (specifically: Physics, Mathematics, Computer Science, Quantitative Biology, Quantitative Finance and Statistics), not all academic fields. So, the question, which seems to pose this as a general inquiry about the need for journals, is overly broad in the context of offer ArXiv as an alternative. Second ...


26

It's difficult to answer this question effectively because it is premised on some incorrect assumptions. Let me begin by correcting them: There is no such thing as an "official" scientific publication. There is no Board Of Serious Scientists who determines which publications are legitimate and which are not. Science is a marketplace of ideas, and many ...


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